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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Watson, G. C. (part 2)
Biographical note: G. C. Watson resided in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee from 1936 to 1967. He played an active role in the social and political affairs of the Nevil’s Creek community of Stewart County, Tennessee. In 1936, he purchased the inventory of the Cherry General Store, which he later owned and operated until 1967. The same year he purchased the store, Watson was elected magistrate for Stewart County’s Eighth District.
Description: G. C. Watson a local historian from the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee discusses the financial aspects of owning a small business, population dynamics and social customs of the lake communities. In addition to commenting on the history of the Stewart family, Watson provided details on the mill at Tharp, bootleggers in Stewart County and information on historical buildings and sites on the Land between the Lakes.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 18 October 1976
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH073
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Watson, G. C. (part 1)
Biographical note: G. C. Watson resided in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee from 1936 to 1967. He played an active role in the social and political affairs of the Nevil’s Creek community of Stewart County, Tennessee. In 1936, he purchased the inventory of the Cherry General Store, which he later owned and operated until 1967. The same year he purchased the store, Watson was elected magistrate for Stewart County’s Eighth District.
Description: G. C. Watson a local historian from the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee discusses the financial aspects of owning a small business, population dynamics and social customs of the lake communities. In addition to commenting on the history of the Stewart family, Watson provided details on the mill at Tharp, bootleggers in Stewart County and information on historical buildings and sites on the Land between the Lakes.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 18 October 1976
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH073
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1936 June 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1936 June 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1939-1948
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 7)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1941 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes four speeches: the first following the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor, one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1941 December 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 4)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 5)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 August
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 July 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 4)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 July 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 5)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 November 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948-1955
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 4)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1949
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 5)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1949-1951
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 6)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1951 December 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 6)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1951-1958
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Kelley, Rosella
Biographical note:
Description: Rosella Kelly recited rhymes, songs and stories taught to her by father and his grandfather, Henry Henson. She recites three rhymes and sings seven songs. Her husband recites two rhymes and a short story.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Mofield, William Ray
Date of interview: 1952 August 1
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH226
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1953
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 6)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1955 August
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of the final speech given by Alben William Barkley and his eulogy given before Congress. The series includes the last speech delivered by Barkley on April 30, 1956 and the memorial service conducted in the United States Senate on May 3, 1956.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1956 April 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of the final speech given by Alben William Barkley and his eulogy given before Congress. The series includes the last speech delivered by Barkley on April 30, 1956 and the memorial service conducted in the United States Senate on May 3, 1956.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1956 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 3, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of the final speech given by Alben William Barkley and his eulogy given before Congress. The series includes the last speech delivered by Barkley on April 30, 1956 and the memorial service conducted in the United States Senate on May 3, 1956.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1956 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Ballad of Alben Barkley
Name of person interviewed: Simpkins, Lee
Biographical note: Published by Miranda Music Publishing Company.
Description: Studio recording titled “Ballad of Alben Barkley” by Arthur Lee Simpkins.
Descriptors: Barkley, Alben William, 1877-1956.
Interviewed by: Carter, Benny, Director.
Date of interview: 1957 April 17
Contributed by: Music and lyrics by H. I. Miranda and Brady Black.
Identification number: MS79-06
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Forrest C. Pogue delivers a speech on the George C. Marshall Project during the Second National Colloquium of Oral History on November 20, 1967 at Harriman, New York. He discusses his selection as General Marshall’s biographer and the early days of the United States Army Oral History Program. He offers anecdotal accounts of collecting interviews from military leaders following the Second World War for his work on the Supreme Command and later for his biography of General Marshall. He concludes with a discussion on the process of surveying oral history interviews and the pros and cons of different methodologies.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Presentation before during the Second National Colloquium.
Date of interview: 1967 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lovett, Henry H. (part 1)
Biographical note:
Description: Henry H. Lovett discusses his life experiences in Marshall County, Kentucky. He recalls an amusing incidents, including hogs under the hotel in Benton, a political speeches at the county courthouse, a singing mouse and the use of brandy as pain killer for dental work. He recounts the history of the Big Sing at Benton and other significant events relevant to the history of Marshall County. He recall guests in Benton Hotel, such as Alben Barkley and other prominent political leaders. He describes the Methodist church in town, changes in transportation and the medical practices. He mentions the legal profession and former county judges, the influence of the Kentucky Dam on Marshall County, local banks, public education, regional sports, and the advancement of automobiles and airplanes.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: McCallum, Shelby
Date of interview: 1970 October 5
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH187
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lovett, Henry H. (part 2)
Biographical note:
Description: Henry H. Lovett discusses his life experiences in Marshall County, Kentucky. He recalls an amusing incidents, including hogs under the hotel in Benton, a political speeches at the county courthouse, a singing mouse and the use of brandy as pain killer for dental work. He recounts the history of the Big Sing at Benton and other significant events relevant to the history of Marshall County. He recall guests in Benton Hotel, such as Alben Barkley and other prominent political leaders. He describes the Methodist church in town, changes in transportation and the medical practices. He mentions the legal profession and former county judges, the influence of the Kentucky Dam on Marshall County, local banks, public education, regional sports, and the advancement of automobiles and airplanes.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: McCallum, Shelby
Date of interview: 1970 October 5
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH187
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Jones, Roger
Biographical note: Roger Jones was a lifelong resident of Calloway County, Kentucky. He resided on his father’s farm during the time of the Night Riders.
Description: Roger Jones discusses how his family was able to sell tobacco in Calloway County, Kentucky during the time of the Night Riders. He recalls how the price of tobacco remained fairly steady in the county after the Night Riders were organized. Jones explains that everyone could work and vote in Calloway County regardless of race. He remarked that Marshall County was quite different regarding race and that African Americans were protected in Calloway County but not in Marshall County. Jones also mentioned the leader of the Night Riders was known to have killed people in the region.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 April
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH084
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Jones, Grace
Biographical note: Grace Jones was born and raised in Pottertown, Kentucky. She was a housewife and teacher in Marshall County, Kentucky.
Description: Grace Jones discusses the activities of the Night Riders in Marshall County, Kentucky. She recalls the names of the leaders in the Night Riders and the names of those that were frequently targeted by the organization. She mentions a group called “Law and Order” which was formed to counter the violence of the Night Riders. Jones also tells how the Night Riders promoted the organization and acquired members.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 April
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH083
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Smith, Gracie
Biographical note: Gracie Smith was a child when the Night Riders raided the Birmingham community of Marshall County, Kentucky in 1908.
Description: Gracie Smith was a child during the time the Knight Riders raided the Birmingham community of Marshall County, Kentucky. Her recollections are based upon personal experiences and hearsay from relatives. Smith describes the Night Riders attempts to force African Americans to leave Birmingham. She recalls guns being fired and raiders roaming the streets. Smith stated that she was never personally harassed by the Night Riders. She does mention a man named John Scrubs, whom she believed was killed by members of the Night Riders.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 April
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH088
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Perry, Arthur
Biographical note: Arthur Perry resided in Almo, Kentucky during the time of the Night Riders.
Description: Arthur Perry discusses his experiences with the Night Riders in Calloway County, Kentucky. He states that he belonged to the “Association” so he was never targeted by the Night Riders. He mentions a few men he knew that were members of the Night Riders. He also recalled that the Night Riders never harassed African Americans in Calloway County.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 April
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH087
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Smith, Marshall
Biographical note: Marshall Smith resided near Birmingham, Kentucky during the time of the Night Riders. Following the raid on the community his family moved to Lyon County, Kentucky.
Description: Marshall “Doc” Smith is an African American who lived about two miles from Birmingham, Kentucky during the time of the Night Riders raid on the community in 1908. Smith describes the raid on Birmingham and what led to the violence. He also mentions the issues of tobacco pricing and the names some of Night Rider leaders in Marshall County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 April 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH089
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Davis, Rube
Biographical note: Rube Davis was a resident of Calloway County, Kentucky.
Description: Rube Davis discusses the activities of the Night Riders in Marshall and Calloway counties in Kentucky during the first decade of the 20th Century. He recalls an incident when he was shot at by a Night Rider. Davis also discusses methods used by Night Riders to prevent the sale of tobacco to the American Tobacco Company.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 April 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH080
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cummings, Ralph
Biographical note: Ralph Cummings was a lifelong resident of Caldwell County, Kentucky.
Description: Ralph Cummings discusses the activities of Night Riders in Caldwell County, Kentucky during the first decade of the 20th Century. He declares that the Night Riders focused on white men who were not taking care of their families. He once recalled a man not having enough wood cut for his family, so the Night Riders made him cut wood at night. The Night Riders also made sure that farmers took care of their horses and mules by making sure the animals were placed in barns, brushed and properly fed. Cummings also mentions that he knew of a man that was shot when he threatened to turn over names of members.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Fletcher, William
Date of interview: 1973 December 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH078
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Buchanan, Bennie
Biographical note: Bennie Buchanan was a lifelong resident of Caldwell County.
Description: Bennie Buchanan discusses the membership of the Night Riders at Princeton, Kentucky and their activities in the region. She describes the Night Riders tearing up tobacco fields and physically injuring farmers. She recalled a young man named Holloway who was drowned by the Night Riders at a place called Becky’s Hole and when the tobacco warehouse at Princeton was burned to the ground. Buchanan also mentions the Night Riders attempt to burn her family’s home. The interview concludes with her discussing two men that were shot at the court house for a crime they did not commit.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Fletcher, William
Date of interview: 1973 December 28 & 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH077
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 2)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 1)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 3, part 3)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Woodall, Kenon
Biographical note: Kenon Woodall was a resident of Almo, Kentucky during the era of the Night Riders.
Description: Kenon Woodall discusses the tobacco situation and reasons for the formation of the Night Riders. He describes activities of the Night Riders in Almo and Calloway County, Kentucky. He also describes the methods used to prevent the sale of tobacco to the American Tobacco Company such as barn burning, scraping of plant beds, tar and feathering of recalcitrant farmers.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 November
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH090
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Gream, Willie
Biographical note: Willie Gream was born in Calloway County, Kentucky in 1892. He moved away from Kentucky for about forty years to work for the railroad. He returned to Calloway County to become a part-time farmer and brick layer.
Description: Willie Gream recalls meeting members of the Night Riders in Calloway County, Kentucky. Not one of them spoke to him but he did notice many of them were riding grey mules. He further discusses the activities of the Night Riders, such as scrapping tobacco plants. He remembers that the Night Riders wanted to raise the price of tobacco and that they tarred and feathered those who opposed their ideologies. Gream also discussed the fact that he was never bothered by the Night Riders since he was a member of the “Association” and worked at an “Association” tobacco farm. He briefly mentioned that the Night Riders did not harass African Americans in Calloway County but offered no reasons why.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 November 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH081
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Magness, Connie
Biographical note: Connie Magness was a lifelong resident of Calloway County, Kentucky. He was a child living on his father’s farm during the era of the Night Riders.
Description: Connie Magness initially explains that he never was informed nor witnessed any racism in Marshall or Calloway County, Kentucky during the time of the Night Riders. He also discusses how the Night Riders would scrape the tobacco plant beds. He also mentions the “Law and Order” society formed against the Night Riders.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH085
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Buchanan, Ross
Biographical note: Ross Buchanan was born about 1896 and attended public schools in Union County, Kentucky. He attended Morganfield High School and played on the varsity football team. In 1918, he enlisted in the United States Army and was discharge after the conclusion of the First World War in 1919.
Description: Ross Buchanan discusses growing up in Union County, Kentucky during the early half of the 20th century. He describes his close friendship with Earle C. Clements and the impact he had on Clements’ career in politics.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH163
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Munford, F. Tyler (part 2)
Biographical note: F. Tyler Munford came with his father to Morganfield, Kentucky to establish the Union County Advocate newspaper in 1924. He served in the Kentucky State House of Representatives from 1929 to 1939.
Description: F. Tyler Munford discusses his career in Kentucky politics and his professional relationship with Earle C. Clements. His interview offers an overview on the major political issues and events in Kentucky from the mid-1920s through the mid-1950s. He describes various legislative acts and decisions made by Clements while he was in the Kentucky State Legislature and serving as governor. Munford also provided information on party politics in Morganfield and Union County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH166
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Munford, F. Tyler (part 1)
Biographical note: F. Tyler Munford came with his father to Morganfield, Kentucky to establish the Union County Advocate newspaper in 1924. He served in the Kentucky State House of Representatives from 1929 to 1939.
Description: F. Tyler Munford discusses his career in Kentucky politics and his professional relationship with Earle C. Clements. His interview offers an overview on the major political issues and events in Kentucky from the mid-1920s through the mid-1950s. He describes various legislative acts and decisions made by Clements while he was in the Kentucky State Legislature and serving as governor. Munford also provided information on party politics in Morganfield and Union County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH166
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cartwright, Carrol
Biographical note: Carrol Cartwright was born around 1900 in Morganfield, Kentucky. He attended high school in Morganfield but did not graduate. He joined the Odd Fellows Club in 1923. In 1932, he began his career at the Morganfield Post Office at Morganfield. He retired as the Assistant Post-Master in 1968.
Description: Carrol Cartwright discusses his lifelong friendship with Earle C. Clements. He recalls Clements’ involvement and position in the Odd Fellows Club and interest in sports. He concludes with his recollections of Morganfield, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH164
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: McElroy, O.R.
Biographical note: O. R. McElroy was born about 1906. He attended Morganfield High School in the mid-1920s where he played football under Earl C. Clements.
Description: O. R. McElroy discusses playing football during the 1920s at Morganfield High School, Morganfield, Kentucky, under the coach Earl C. Clements. Clements later became a prominent politician serving as governor of Kentucky and as a United States Senator.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH177
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lindo, William H.
Biographical note: William H. Lindo was born about 1892 in Morganfield, Kentucky. He joined the Masonic Lodge in 1917. He was drafted for military service during the First World War but was declared exempt after failing the Army physical.
Description: William H. Lindo discusses his friendship with Earle C. Clements when they resided in Morganfield, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He details Clements’ football coaching career at Morganfield High School and his early political career in Union County. He provides a description of Morganfield and Union County during the Great Depression.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH165
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 5)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 7)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 4)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 3)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 6)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Jennings, Kirby
Biographical note: Kirby Jennings was the owner and editor of the Murray Democrat newspaper of Murray Kentucky from 1950s to 1975.
Description: Kirby Jennings discusses articles located in the Murray Democrat related to the Night Riders of Calloway County, Kentucky. He mentions a letter that states Felix G. Ewing was the founder of the Night Riders. Jennings describes how the Night Riders never initiated any violence in Calloway County and that they were principally a non-violent organization. He discusses the governor sending military troops to Murray, Kentucky to maintain order. He concludes by telling a story of Jake Ellis, the only man to be charged with being a Night Rider in Calloway County.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Jones, Susan
Date of interview: 1973 September 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH082
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 8)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 3)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 6)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 4)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 9)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 5)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 7)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career after his term as Governor. He lists the gubernatorial candidates he assisted and mentored and his impression of them. Nunn examines his failed United States Senate race in 1972 and his shortcomings that led to his loss. The session concludes with his describing his life after holding a major political office and the future of the Republican Party both in Kentucky and nationally.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 April 15
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career after his term as Governor. He lists the gubernatorial candidates he assisted and mentored and his impression of them. Nunn examines his failed United States Senate race in 1972 and his shortcomings that led to his loss. The session concludes with his describing his life after holding a major political office and the future of the Republican Party both in Kentucky and nationally.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 April 15
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Curd, Stafford
Biographical note: Sanford Curd was born in Dexter, Kentucky, on April 26, 1900. As a young boy, he worked on his father’s farm processing tobacco near Dexter. Curd’s father was on the jury that tried members of the Night Riders at Murray, Kentucky. Curd traveled all over the United States with a road construction crew but returned to Dexter years later. He also owned a barber shop in Murray.
Description: Sanford Curd discusses events told to him by his father, Lander Curd, about the Night Riders and the criminal trials associated with the group at Murray, Kentucky. Lander Curd was a strong association man who only sold only within the association and was never directly affected by the Night Riders.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Ryan, John
Date of interview: 1974 April 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH079
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hortin, Loren Joseph
Biographical note: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin was born at Albion, Illinois in 1904. He attended McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois and graduated in 1927. After graduation, he taught at various high schools in Illinois and worked as a reporter for the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1928, he was hired as a faculty member at Murray State Normal School as an instructor of journalism. From 1930 to 1947, he was a staff writer for the Associated Press, Louisville Courier-Journal and Paducah Sun-Democrat. He acquired a Master of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1943. In 1947, he became director of the School of Journalism at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Hortin returned to Murray State in 1967 and acted as head of the journalism program until his retirement in 1974. Between 1928 and 1938, he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, which sought to construct a dam on the lower Tennessee River. He also was the manager of the City Chamber of Commerce at Murray from 1934 to 1938. He was elected into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1981 and received honorary doctorates from McKendree College and Murray State University. He died on November 27, 1992.
Description: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin details his experiences during the Second World War. He explains day to day life in Murray, Kentucky and the Jackson Purchase. He also reflects upon the sentiments of the population prior to and during the war. He mentions rationing and the illegal trading of ration stamps, as well as the economic consequences of the war. He discusses the economic concerns of the lend-lease program and regional plants that produced ammunition and clothing for the war effort.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hoyt, Michael
Date of interview: 1974 December 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH145
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Roberts, Frank
Biographical note: Frank Roberts was born May 10, 1908 in Calloway County, Kentucky. He was one of the first graduates of the Murray Training School (presently Murray State University) in 1927. Prior to the Second World War, he worked for the Ford Motor Company in Detroit, Michigan. After the war he constructed homes in Murray from 1944 until 1952, when he began working for the Pennsalt Chemical Company (currently Arkema Inc.) in Calvert City, Kentucky. He retired in 1970.
Description: Frank Roberts recounts his experiences during the Second World War. He discusses effects of the Second World War in Calloway County, Kentucky. He then explains the changes which occurred at the Ford Motor Company at Detroit, Michigan during the war. He also describes rationing, prominent individuals and political organizations during the era. He concludes by describing racial attitudes and relations in Calloway County during and after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hoyt, Michael A.
Date of interview: 1974 December 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH151
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cunningham, Guy
Biographical note: Guy Cunningham was born in 1928 in Calloway County, Kentucky. His family farmed strawberries, hemp and other crops during the Second World War. He had older two brothers and two brother-in-laws who fought during the war.
Description: Guy Cunningham offers details into his experiences in Calloway County, Kentucky, during the Second World War. The interview focuses on his family’s economic and social status as farmers during the war. He recalls governmental programs effecting Calloway County, including scrap drives, rationing, the 4-H Club and censorship. He concludes by descussing the involvement of local churches during war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hoyt, Michael A.
Date of interview: 1974 December 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH139
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Night Riders - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Paschall, Zollie
Biographical note: Zollie Paschall was a lifelong resident of Calloway County, Kentucky. She was 16 years old and lived with her sister outside of Murray, Kentucky when the Night Riders organized protests over the price of tobacco.
Description: Zollie Paschall reflects upon her encounters with the Night Riders in Calloway County, Kentucky. She begins the interview by discussing her background and family history. She states that the Night Riders had no major affect upon her family but they did create problems for the family of her husband Otry Paschall. She describes how Orty’s uncle, Don Paschall, had his tobacco crop burned the day it was to go to market.
Descriptors: Night Riders (Group) -- History.
Interviewed by: Humphreys, George
Date of interview: 1974 February 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH086
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 6)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 1)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 3)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 5)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 2)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 4)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Leary, Joseph J. (part 1)
Biographical note: Joseph J. Leary was an attorney who aided Earle C. Clements in his 1947 gubernatorial campaign. He was also a delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Kentucky in 1956.
Description: Joseph J. Leary discusses Earle C. Clements’ gubernatorial campaign in 1947 and provides some minor details into Clements’ tenure as Governor of Kentucky. He details his first meeting with Clements and the role he played in Clements’ gubernatorial campaign. He describes major political issues faced by Clements, including a Veterinary School to Kentucky, strip mining for coal, special interests groups and the Kentucky State Judiciary Building scandal. The interview concludes with Leary discussing why Clements chose Lawrence Weatherby to run as his Lieutenant Governor.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH175
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Leary, Joseph J. (part 2)
Biographical note: Joseph J. Leary was an attorney who aided Earle C. Clements in his 1947 gubernatorial campaign. He was also a delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Kentucky in 1956.
Description: Joseph J. Leary discusses Earle C. Clements’ gubernatorial campaign in 1947 and provides some minor details into Clements’ tenure as Governor of Kentucky. He details his first meeting with Clements and the role he played in Clements’ gubernatorial campaign. He describes major political issues faced by Clements, including a Veterinary School to Kentucky, strip mining for coal, special interests groups and the Kentucky State Judiciary Building scandal. The interview concludes with Leary discussing why Clements chose Lawrence Weatherby to run as his Lieutenant Governor.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH175
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Knuckles, Denver C. (part 1)
Biographical note: Denver C. Knuckles was born at Knuckles, Bell County, Kentucky in 1908. He graduated high school in Hazard, Kentucky in 1929. While attending high school he worked for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and following graduation worked for the Kentucky Utilities Company. Prior to the start of the Second World War he worked in Mayfield, Kentucky selling Life Insurance. In 1942 he joined the United States Marine Corp and fought at the Battle of Iwo Jima. After the war he returned to Bell County, Kentucky. In 1956 he was elected to the State Senate and in 1962 he was elected as a State Representative. He returned to the State Senate in 1972. He later served as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Teacher’s Retirement System of Kentucky. He died on May 1, 1988.
Description: State Senator Denver C. Knuckles provides details into his family history and Kentucky politics. He recounts his family history as far back as the American Civil War and the community of Knuckles in Bell County. He offers a brief account of his experiences prior to and during the Second World War. The remainder of the interview focuses on his election to the State legislature and the major issues of importance from the 1950s to the early 1970s. His discussion includes major political figures including governors Happy Chandler and Louie B. Nunn.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH170
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Knuckles, Denver C. (part 2)
Biographical note: Denver C. Knuckles was born at Knuckles, Bell County, Kentucky in 1908. He graduated high school in Hazard, Kentucky in 1929. While attending high school he worked for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and following graduation worked for the Kentucky Utilities Company. Prior to the start of the Second World War he worked in Mayfield, Kentucky selling Life Insurance. In 1942 he joined the United States Marine Corp and fought at the Battle of Iwo Jima. After the war he returned to Bell County, Kentucky. In 1956 he was elected to the State Senate and in 1962 he was elected as a State Representative. He returned to the State Senate in 1972. He later served as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Teacher’s Retirement System of Kentucky. He died on May 1, 1988.
Description: State Senator Denver C. Knuckles provides details into his family history and Kentucky politics. He recounts his family history as far back as the American Civil War and the community of Knuckles in Bell County. He offers a brief account of his experiences prior to and during the Second World War. The remainder of the interview focuses on his election to the State legislature and the major issues of importance from the 1950s to the early 1970s. His discussion includes major political figures including governors Happy Chandler and Louie B. Nunn.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH170
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle Chester Clements discusses his life and career up through the 1970s. He details the genealogical history of the Clements family and their achievements in colonial America. He provides an overview of his political career and Kentucky’s statewide efforts to bring electric power to all its citizens. He concludes the interview by describing the years that followed his departure from the United States Senate.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle Chester Clements discusses his life and career up through the 1970s. He details the genealogical history of the Clements family and their achievements in colonial America. He provides an overview of his political career and Kentucky’s statewide efforts to bring electric power to all its citizens. He concludes the interview by describing the years that followed his departure from the United States Senate.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: McCuiston, Pat M. (part 2)
Biographical note: Pat M. McCuiston was born in Calloway County, Kentucky to a tenant farmer. In 1939, his family moved to Christian County. After graduating college he taught at Pembroke, Kentucky and later worked for Thomas Industries at Hopkinsville before finally entering into the business of banking. He was elected to the Kentucky State Senate from the Third District in 1968 and served until 1991.
Description: Pat M. McCuiston discusses Kentucky politics of the early 1970s. He begins with a short biography of his life and career prior to entering the Kentucky State Senate in 1968. He describes the economic makeup of his district and county redistricting in 1970. He reflects upon the major issues facing the 1974 Legislative Session, including the “No-Fault Insurance Bill” and “Multi-Bank Holding Companies”. He further describes the debate surrounding establishment of a Veterinary School at either Murray State University or the University of Kentucky. The interview concludes with McCuiston’s opinions on Governor Wendell H. Ford, western Kentucky coal and Democrat verses Republican ideologies in the State of Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH171
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: McCuiston, Pat M. (part 1)
Biographical note: Pat M. McCuiston was born in Calloway County, Kentucky to a tenant farmer. In 1939, his family moved to Christian County. After graduating college he taught at Pembroke, Kentucky and later worked for Thomas Industries at Hopkinsville before finally entering into the business of banking. He was elected to the Kentucky State Senate from the Third District in 1968 and served until 1991.
Description: Pat M. McCuiston discusses Kentucky politics of the early 1970s. He begins with a short biography of his life and career prior to entering the Kentucky State Senate in 1968. He describes the economic makeup of his district and county redistricting in 1970. He reflects upon the major issues facing the 1974 Legislative Session, including the “No-Fault Insurance Bill” and “Multi-Bank Holding Companies”. He further describes the debate surrounding establishment of a Veterinary School at either Murray State University or the University of Kentucky. The interview concludes with McCuiston’s opinions on Governor Wendell H. Ford, western Kentucky coal and Democrat verses Republican ideologies in the State of Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH171
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cornett, John Chris (part 1)
Biographical note: John Chris Cornett was born in Florence, Indiana on August 6, 1910. He graduated from Knott County High School and attended Morehead State Teachers College (now Morehead State University), the University of Kentucky and the Cumberland Law School. He taught at public schools for twelve years before entering politics. From 1938 to 1940 he served as State Representative for Knott and Magoffin Counties. In 1941, he was elected County Judge for Knott County. Cornett was appointed Circuit Court Judge in 1950, a position which he held for over twenty years. He also served as State senator of the 29th District from 1972 to 1976. Cornett later served a second term as Circuit Court Judge from 1976 to 1984. He died on June 3, 1993 in Lexington, Kentucky.
Description: John Chris Cornett discusses the politics in the State of Kentucky from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. During the first half of the interview he examines the coal industry in Kentucky and reasons for running for political office which focused on the elections of judges. The second half covers his opinions on major legislation during his tenure as State senator, including the Cook Bill, Worker’s Compensation legislation and the Black Lung Bill. The interview concludes with a discussion on Governor Wendell H. Ford.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH162
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cornett, John Chris (part 2)
Biographical note: John Chris Cornett was born in Florence, Indiana on August 6, 1910. He graduated from Knott County High School and attended Morehead State Teachers College (now Morehead State University), the University of Kentucky and the Cumberland Law School. He taught at public schools for twelve years before entering politics. From 1938 to 1940 he served as State Representative for Knott and Magoffin Counties. In 1941, he was elected County Judge for Knott County. Cornett was appointed Circuit Court Judge in 1950, a position which he held for over twenty years. He also served as State senator of the 29th District from 1972 to 1976. Cornett later served a second term as Circuit Court Judge from 1976 to 1984. He died on June 3, 1993 in Lexington, Kentucky.
Description: John Chris Cornett discusses the politics in the State of Kentucky from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. During the first half of the interview he examines the coal industry in Kentucky and reasons for running for political office which focused on the elections of judges. The second half covers his opinions on major legislation during his tenure as State senator, including the Cook Bill, Worker’s Compensation legislation and the Black Lung Bill. The interview concludes with a discussion on Governor Wendell H. Ford.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH162
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 1, Part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of the State of Kentucky, discusses his political career up to 1974. He begins with his military service during the Second World War and formal education at the University of Kentucky. He recounts his service in the Kentucky State Legislature and the major issues he faced as a representative. He discusses his gubernatorial campaign and expresses his opinions on significant political figures in the state, such as Bert T. Combs, Wilson Wyatt, Happy Chandler and Earle C. Clements. He closes with the controversial topics he faced as governor and campaign strategies he used during his career.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 1, Part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of the State of Kentucky, discusses his political career up to 1974. He begins with his military service during the Second World War and formal education at the University of Kentucky. He recounts his service in the Kentucky State Legislature and the major issues he faced as a representative. He discusses his gubernatorial campaign and expresses his opinions on significant political figures in the state, such as Bert T. Combs, Wilson Wyatt, Happy Chandler and Earle C. Clements. He closes with the controversial topics he faced as governor and campaign strategies he used during his career.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 1, Part 3)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of the State of Kentucky, discusses his political career up to 1974. He begins with his military service during the Second World War and formal education at the University of Kentucky. He recounts his service in the Kentucky State Legislature and the major issues he faced as a representative. He discusses his gubernatorial campaign and expresses his opinions on significant political figures in the state, such as Bert T. Combs, Wilson Wyatt, Happy Chandler and Earle C. Clements. He closes with the controversial topics he faced as governor and campaign strategies he used during his career.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 4)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 6)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 5)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 7)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 2, part 3)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Session includes recordings of numerous presentations made during the events of “Pogue Day”, a bicentennial event in Lyon County, Kentucky which honored Forrest C. Pogue on May 24th and May 25th, 1974. The recordings captured the two day event in its entirely, including the opening ceremonies and banquet at Lyon County High School, the brunch at Kuttawa Methodist Church and the portrait presentation at Lyon County Public Library. Topics discussed during the event range from biographical sketches of Pogue’s life, anecdotal stories from friends, family and dignitaries and personal recollections from Pogue on his childhood days in Lyon County and professional career as an historian. He also describes attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College, his experiences during the Second World War and his research on General George C. Marshall.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Recorded by the Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Institute at Murray State Universtiy by Dr. James W. Hammack, Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 May 24–25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his life and career prior to entering into Kentucky politics. He mentions his graduation from Morganfield High School in 1915, attending the University of Kentucky and enlistment in the National Guard during the First World War. He describes his experiences at Fort Benjamin Harrison near Lawrence, Indiana and being commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. He also recalls his military service at Camp Taylor near Louisville, Kentucky and the Lewis Institute (presently the Illinois Institute of Technology) in Chicago, Illinois.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 October 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 11)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 08)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 03)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 09)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 06)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 05)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 12)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 07)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 01)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 04)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 10)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 02)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the political landscape of Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s as well as the ideological differences that divided the State’s Democratic Party when he served as Governor. He recounts the specific qualities he sought when selecting individuals for governmental positions, his abolishment of the Kentucky Highway Patrol and the creation of the Kentucky State Police. He concludes with legislation enacted including road construction projects and the Taft-Hartley Act.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the political landscape of Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s as well as the ideological differences that divided the State’s Democratic Party when he served as Governor. He recounts the specific qualities he sought when selecting individuals for governmental positions, his abolishment of the Kentucky Highway Patrol and the creation of the Kentucky State Police. He concludes with legislation enacted including road construction projects and the Taft-Hartley Act.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Newton, Euen
Biographical note: Euen Newton was a resident of the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky for over 80 years. Her family lived in the area for over 100 years.
Description: Euen Newton discusses living on a farm in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky during the early half of the 20th Century. She describes the different houses she resided at and the farm animals her family owned. Newton offers recollections on local communities, farming and stories told to her about the Civil War, the Night Riders, and the Klu Klux Klan. She mentions the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Corps of Engineers and the influence of other government agencies on the region. She also tells of an incident where a black youth was killed by a mob.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1975 September 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH065
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Leneave, Vance (part 2)
Biographical note: Vance Leneave was born in Golden Pond, Kentucky in 1920. His family had moved to the Land Between the Lakes region when his father was only 10 years old, from a settlement at McShawn’s Bridge. Leneave attended public schools at Cumberland and Golden Pond. He graduated high school at 15, joined the United States Navy and witnessed action during World War II, including the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Description: Vance Leneave discusses family history and his childhood experiences in his father’s general store at Bleidt, Kentucky. He speaks of his experiences in the United States Navy, the fire of 1936 and the community’s early telephone system. He also describes working at the post office, including operations against thievery, types of mailing, delivery routes and road conditions.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 April 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH058
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Leneave, Vance (part 1)
Biographical note: Vance Leneave was born in Golden Pond, Kentucky in 1920. His family had moved to the Land Between the Lakes region when his father was only 10 years old, from a settlement at McShawn’s Bridge. Leneave attended public schools at Cumberland and Golden Pond. He graduated high school at 15, joined the United States Navy and witnessed action during World War II, including the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Description: Vance Leneave discusses family history and his childhood experiences in his father’s general store at Bleidt, Kentucky. He speaks of his experiences in the United States Navy, the fire of 1936 and the community’s early telephone system. He also describes working at the post office, including operations against thievery, types of mailing, delivery routes and road conditions.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 April 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH058
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Marshall, Thelma Heath
Biographical note:
Description: Thelma Marshall recites a history of the Heath family and the Bald Knob School.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Sirls, Barbara
Date of interview: 1976 April 3
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH241
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Moseley, Mark H.
Biographical note: Mark H. Moseley was born in Hancock County, Kentucky in 1921. He graduated from Indiana University in 1944 and later attended medical school at the University of California. During the Second World War he was involved in the Manhattan Project. He relocated to Eddyville, Kentucky in 1949, where he maintained a medical practice for over forty years.
Description: Mark H. Moseley was an avid scholar of history. He interviewed many people in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky during the 1950s and 1960s. He describes early medical practices, the pioneer doctors and the pathology unique to the region. He also discusses of the iron industry, the Hillman’s and the Night Riders.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 August 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH063
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hooks, Wallace
Biographical note: Wallace Hooks was born near the Cumberland River in Trigg County, Kentucky in 1922. His grandfather worked at the furnace at Hemitite, Tennessee and his father was a sharecropper. Hook relocated to Alton, Illinois in 1940 to work on the railroad. He later returned to Kentucky where he worked as a carpenter at the United States Army base at Fort Campbell. He also served in the military for a short period of time.
Description: Wallace Hooks discusses the moonshine business in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. He describes his association with Joe Bogard, the “King of Moonshiners” and the traffic of illegal whiskey in the region. He also recalls large scale farming operations in the 1930s and 1940s. Hooks remembers log buildings, the early iron furnaces and how Fungo, Kentucky was named. He also mentions the Civil War and the occupation of the Land Between the Lakes by early Native Americans.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 August 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH051
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Burd, John H.
Biographical note: John Burd was born in Graves County, Kentucky in 1905. He and his brother, Eddie Burd, were associated with distilling whisky during the prohibition era. During his youth he had learned the method to produce and sell moonshine. After his brother was shot and killed near Dublin, Kentucky in 1926, he made regular trips to the Land Between the Lakes to obtain drinking whiskey.
Description: John Burd discusses his activities as a moonshine runner during the prohibition era in Graves and Trigg Counties, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 August 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH040
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bogard, Genella
Biographical note: Genella Bogard was born in Trigg County, Kentucky in 1902. She was raised near the Center Furnace, Kentucky where her father worked as a night watchman at the iron foundry. As a child she attended the Hematite and Cumberland Schools. She later taught in the Land Between the Lakes region at Pryor Hollow, Golden Pond and Ferguson Springs during the 1940s. In 1923 she married Joe Bogard, known to locals as the “King of Moonshiners”. After his death in 1933, she remarried again briefly in 1941. She later worked in the old age assistance office at the Ken Lake Hotel until her retirement and subsequent displacement to Cadiz in 1966. She died in 1983 and was buried at the Bogard Family Cemetery.
Description: Genella Bogard describes her experiences living in Center Furnace, Kentucky. She recalls employment opportunities and the iron industry from her childhood. She discusses the school system in the Land Between the Lakes region and compares it to those in other areas of Kentucky. She recalls of the coexistence of black and white communities at Center Furnace and the role of African-American culture in the community. She describes the Bogard House, in which she lived for 43 years, and mentions her husband’s infamous career as the “Whiskey King”. She addresses a legend associated to Al Capone and relates some information about Joe Bogard’s finances.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 August 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH039
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hortin, L. J. (Loren Joseph) (part 2)
Biographical note: Loren Joseph Horton was born at Albion, Illinois in 1904. He attended McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois and graduated in 1927. After graduation he taught at various high schools in Illinois and worked as a reporter for the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1928, he was hired as a faculty member at Murray State Normal School as an instructor of journalism. From 1930 to 1947, he was a staff writer for the Associated Press, Louisville Courier-Journal and Paducah Sun-Democrat. He acquired a Master of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1943. In 1947, he became director of the School of Journalism at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Horton returned to Murray State in 1967 and acted as head of the journalism program until his retirement in 1974. Between 1928 and 1938, he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, which sought to construct a dam on the lower Tennessee River. He also was the manager of the City Chamber of Commerce at Murray from 1934 to 1938. He was elected into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1981 and received honorary doctorates from McKendree College and Murray State University. He died on November 27, 1992.
Description: L. J. Hortin served as an executive officer of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association from 1928 to 1938. He recites a history of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, why it was formed and what it accomplished. He remarked that the Association was not officially connected with the Tennessee Valley Authority and that the Lower Tennessee Valley Association preceded the Tennessee Valley Authority. He believes that the hardest job of the LTVA was pressuring the TVA into building a dam in Kentucky. He reviewed the tactics the organization used to construct a dam and recalls the happiest day in his life was when he received word from Senator Alben Barkley that the amendment for a dam at Gilbertsville, Kentucky had been passed. The LTVA had a membership of about 800 and had its last official meeting at the dedication of Barkley Bam, although regular meetings ceased in 1947.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 February 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH052
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hortin, L. J. (Loren Joseph) (part 1)
Biographical note: Loren Joseph Horton was born at Albion, Illinois in 1904. He attended McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois and graduated in 1927. After graduation he taught at various high schools in Illinois and worked as a reporter for the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1928, he was hired as a faculty member at Murray State Normal School as an instructor of journalism. From 1930 to 1947, he was a staff writer for the Associated Press, Louisville Courier-Journal and Paducah Sun-Democrat. He acquired a Master of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1943. In 1947, he became director of the School of Journalism at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Horton returned to Murray State in 1967 and acted as head of the journalism program until his retirement in 1974. Between 1928 and 1938, he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, which sought to construct a dam on the lower Tennessee River. He also was the manager of the City Chamber of Commerce at Murray from 1934 to 1938. He was elected into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1981 and received honorary doctorates from McKendree College and Murray State University. He died on November 27, 1992.
Description: L. J. Hortin served as an executive officer of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association from 1928 to 1938. He recites a history of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, why it was formed and what it accomplished. He remarked that the Association was not officially connected with the Tennessee Valley Authority and that the Lower Tennessee Valley Association preceded the Tennessee Valley Authority. He believes that the hardest job of the LTVA was pressuring the TVA into building a dam in Kentucky. He reviewed the tactics the organization used to construct a dam and recalls the happiest day in his life was when he received word from Senator Alben Barkley that the amendment for a dam at Gilbertsville, Kentucky had been passed. The LTVA had a membership of about 800 and had its last official meeting at the dedication of Barkley Bam, although regular meetings ceased in 1947.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 February 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH052
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hortin, Loren Joseph (part 2)
Biographical note: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin was born at Albion, Illinois in 1904. He graduated from McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois in 1927. After graduation, he taught at various high schools in Illinois and worked as a reporter for the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1928, he was hired as a faculty member at Murray State Normal School as an instructor of journalism. From 1930 to 1947, he was a staff writer for the Associated Press, Louisville Courier-Journal and Paducah Sun-Democrat. He acquired a Master of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1943. In 1947, he became director of the School of Journalism at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Hortin returned to Murray State in 1967 and acted as head of the journalism program until his retirement in 1974. Between 1928 and 1938, he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, which sought to construct a dam on the lower Tennessee River. He also served as the manager of the City Chamber of Commerce at Murray from 1934 to 1938. He was elected into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1981 and received honorary doctorates from McKendree College and Murray State University. He died on November 27, 1992.
Description: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin discusses the political aspects of the decision to build the Kentucky Dam. He explains how prior to the creation of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association (LTVA), which sought to build a dam in Aurora, Kentucky, and how that evolved into the region’s Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). He describes the leadership of the LTVA and the actions of significant individuals, particularly Luther Draffen, who encouraged the construction of a dam on the Tennessee River. He also mentioned the opposition to the dam and the debate between a purely navigational dam verses a hydroelectric dam.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 February 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH204
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hortin, Loren Joseph (part 1)
Biographical note: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin was born at Albion, Illinois in 1904. He graduated from McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois in 1927. After graduation, he taught at various high schools in Illinois and worked as a reporter for the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1928, he was hired as a faculty member at Murray State Normal School as an instructor of journalism. From 1930 to 1947, he was a staff writer for the Associated Press, Louisville Courier-Journal and Paducah Sun-Democrat. He acquired a Master of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1943. In 1947, he became director of the School of Journalism at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Hortin returned to Murray State in 1967 and acted as head of the journalism program until his retirement in 1974. Between 1928 and 1938, he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, which sought to construct a dam on the lower Tennessee River. He also served as the manager of the City Chamber of Commerce at Murray from 1934 to 1938. He was elected into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1981 and received honorary doctorates from McKendree College and Murray State University. He died on November 27, 1992.
Description: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin discusses the political aspects of the decision to build the Kentucky Dam. He explains how prior to the creation of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association (LTVA), which sought to build a dam in Aurora, Kentucky, and how that evolved into the region’s Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). He describes the leadership of the LTVA and the actions of significant individuals, particularly Luther Draffen, who encouraged the construction of a dam on the Tennessee River. He also mentioned the opposition to the dam and the debate between a purely navigational dam verses a hydroelectric dam.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 February 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH204
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Askew, Thomas Lee
Biographical note: The Askew family arrived in Stewart County, Tennessee in 1828 from North Carolina. Thomas Lee Askew was a resident of Land Between the Lakes near Model, Tennessee.
Description: Thomas Lee Askew discusses the history of Stewart County, Tennessee. He describes northern troops occupying Dover, Tennessee during the Civil War, details on the activities of the Night Riders in southern Tennessee and the arrival of the Tennessee Valley Authority into Land Between the Lakes region. he also mentions farming methods and equipment used in the region and religious sects and churches in Tennessee.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 January 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH034
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ahart, Seldon
Biographical note: Seldon Ahart was born near Golden Pond, Kentucky in 1905. His parents owned and operated two small farms in Western Kentucky. Shortly before his death in the 1920s, Seldon’s father purchased a general store in the Land Between the Lakes area. For the next two decades Seldon continued to be associated with both farming and the mercantile business. At the end of the Second World War, Ahart worked as a toll collector on the Cumberland River Bridge.Seldon Ahart was born near Golden Pond, Kentucky in 1905. The family farm was situated along the Cumberland River just below Elbow Bend and near Long Creek.
Description: Seldon Ahart recalls farm operations prior to and following mechanized farming techniques. His recollections include experiences in the mercantile business and the role the general store had in a rural community. Ahart also provides many interesting observations on daily life and social conditions in the Land Between the Lakes region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH031
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Wilson, Lucil
Biographical note: Lucil Wilson was born on a farm near Eddyville, Kentucky in 1928. She was raised in the Bethlehem community and attended the Wake School and later Eddyville High School. Upon graduation she began teaching at the Wake School and then at Golden Pond, Kentucky.
Description: Lucil Wilson discusses the educational system in the Land Between the Lakes region in Kentucky at both the elementary and secondary levels. She describes attending a one room school as a child and compares that experience with other educational institutions throughout her teaching career. She recalls the schools at Cadiz, Kentucky and the qualification requirements needed for a teachers’ certificate in the early 1940s. She reflects upon her school work and activities, along with her goals and responsibilities as an educator. Wilson concludes by describing her husband’s general store, purchasing store items on credit, bartering and local hucksters.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH076
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ryan, Beulah (part 2)
Biographical note: Beulah Ryan was born in 1893 on a farm near the Cumberland River. Her family relocated to the Land Between the Lakes region in 1904. She resided at Golden Pond until her marriage in 1912. She was a member of the Golden Pond Baptist Church, which her father helped found in 1905. Ryan was an active member of the church where she was a Sunday school teacher and played the piano during services.
Description: Beulah Ryan discusses her experiences in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky from the turn of the century to the latter part of the 20th Century. She describes in detail various aspects of life on a rural Kentucky farm, area churches and religious events. Ryan also recalls stories told to her regarding the Civil War, the Night Riders, the making of illegal whiskey and food production and preservation in the Land Between the Lakes area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 2 & 1976 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH067
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ryan, Beulah (part 4)
Biographical note: Beulah Ryan was born in 1893 on a farm near the Cumberland River. Her family relocated to the Land Between the Lakes region in 1904. She resided at Golden Pond until her marriage in 1912. She was a member of the Golden Pond Baptist Church, which her father helped found in 1905. Ryan was an active member of the church where she was a Sunday school teacher and played the piano during services.
Description: Beulah Ryan discusses her experiences in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky from the turn of the century to the latter part of the 20th Century. She describes in detail various aspects of life on a rural Kentucky farm, area churches and religious events. Ryan also recalls stories told to her regarding the Civil War, the Night Riders, the making of illegal whiskey and food production and preservation in the Land Between the Lakes area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 2 & 1976 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH067
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ryan, Beulah (part 1)
Biographical note: Beulah Ryan was born in 1893 on a farm near the Cumberland River. Her family relocated to the Land Between the Lakes region in 1904. She resided at Golden Pond until her marriage in 1912. She was a member of the Golden Pond Baptist Church, which her father helped found in 1905. Ryan was an active member of the church where she was a Sunday school teacher and played the piano during services.
Description: Beulah Ryan discusses her experiences in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky from the turn of the century to the latter part of the 20th Century. She describes in detail various aspects of life on a rural Kentucky farm, area churches and religious events. Ryan also recalls stories told to her regarding the Civil War, the Night Riders, the making of illegal whiskey and food production and preservation in the Land Between the Lakes area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 2 & 1976 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH067
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ryan, Beulah (part 3)
Biographical note: Beulah Ryan was born in 1893 on a farm near the Cumberland River. Her family relocated to the Land Between the Lakes region in 1904. She resided at Golden Pond until her marriage in 1912. She was a member of the Golden Pond Baptist Church, which her father helped found in 1905. Ryan was an active member of the church where she was a Sunday school teacher and played the piano during services.
Description: Beulah Ryan discusses her experiences in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky from the turn of the century to the latter part of the 20th Century. She describes in detail various aspects of life on a rural Kentucky farm, area churches and religious events. Ryan also recalls stories told to her regarding the Civil War, the Night Riders, the making of illegal whiskey and food production and preservation in the Land Between the Lakes area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 2 & 1976 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH067
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Payne, Rowena
Biographical note: Rowena Payne was a resident of the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky for over thirty years. She was born in Cadiz, Kentucky in 1898. She relocated with her family to the Land Between the Lakes area in 1902. Her father farmed the “Barber Place”. She was educated at the Hematite School and after graduation became a teacher. She taught at Ferguson Spring and Trigg Furnace. Payne eventually quit teaching to start a business at Sardis, Kentucky.
Description: Rowena Payne discusses foreign immigrants who settled the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky during the early part of the 20th Century. She describes the history of several communities and how they became named and the Night Rider raids on Rockcastle and Birmingham. Payne also recalls stories her parents and grandparents told regarding the Civil War, the educational system in the region and the evolution of her business at Sardis.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH066
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bleidt, Mary Emma
Biographical note: Mary Emma Bleidt was born in 1909 at Golden Pond, Kentucky. Her childhood years were spent at Golden Pond where she attended the local public schools. After graduating high school she attended Bethel College in Hopkinsville, Kentucky and later Murray State University. She taught school in the Land Between the Lakes region during the 1920s and 1930s. She was appointed postmaster of Golden Pond in 1937 and held that position until 1942. Bleidt’s grandfather, William Wilson, owned and operated Wilson’s General Store at Golden Pond, which remained in business until 1946.
Description: Mary Emma Bleidt discusses managing the post office at Golden Pond, Kentucky and teaching at public schools in the Land Between the Lakes region from the 1920s to the 1940s. She also reflects upon her childhood years working at her grandfather’s general store in Golden Pond.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH038
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bleidt, Mary Emma
Biographical note: Mary Emma Bleidt was born in 1909 at Golden Pond, Kentucky. Her childhood years were spent at Golden Pond where she attended the local public schools. After graduating high school she attended Bethel College in Hopkinsville, Kentucky and later Murray State University. She taught school in the Land Between the Lakes region during the 1920s and 1930s. She was appointed postmaster of Golden Pond in 1937 and held that position until 1942. Bleidt’s grandfather, William Wilson, owned and operated Wilson’s General Store at Golden Pond, which remained in business until 1946.
Description: Mary Emma Bleidt discusses managing the post office at Golden Pond, Kentucky and teaching at public schools in the Land Between the Lakes region from the 1920s to the 1940s. She also reflects upon her childhood years working at her grandfather’s general store in Golden Pond.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH038
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bleidt, George (part 1)
Biographical note: George Bleidt was born in Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky in 1911. He resided near what was Bleidt, Kentucky prior to the purchase of the Land Between the Lakes. Bleidt attended school at Cumberland, Kentucky and later attended high school in Cadiz, Kentucky. He later worked for the United States Geological Survey in Western Kentucky.
Description: George Bleidt was the postmaster and funeral director for the city of Golden Pond, Kentucky. He discusses how the Tennessee Valley Authority was founded and how it affected the life of the people along the Cumberland and Tennessee Valleys. He describes the positive and negative effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority and how the people of the region received the idea of a wildlife refuge in what is now known as the Land Between the Lakes.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry & Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 9 & 1979 June 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH037
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bleidt, George (part 3)
Biographical note: George Bleidt was born in Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky in 1911. He resided near what was Bleidt, Kentucky prior to the purchase of the Land Between the Lakes. Bleidt attended school at Cumberland, Kentucky and later attended high school in Cadiz, Kentucky. He later worked for the United States Geological Survey in Western Kentucky.
Description: George Bleidt was the postmaster and funeral director for the city of Golden Pond, Kentucky. He discusses how the Tennessee Valley Authority was founded and how it affected the life of the people along the Cumberland and Tennessee Valleys. He describes the positive and negative effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority and how the people of the region received the idea of a wildlife refuge in what is now known as the Land Between the Lakes.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry & Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 9 & 1979 June 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH037
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bleidt, George (part 2)
Biographical note: George Bleidt was born in Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky in 1911. He resided near what was Bleidt, Kentucky prior to the purchase of the Land Between the Lakes. Bleidt attended school at Cumberland, Kentucky and later attended high school in Cadiz, Kentucky. He later worked for the United States Geological Survey in Western Kentucky.
Description: George Bleidt was the postmaster and funeral director for the city of Golden Pond, Kentucky. He discusses how the Tennessee Valley Authority was founded and how it affected the life of the people along the Cumberland and Tennessee Valleys. He describes the positive and negative effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority and how the people of the region received the idea of a wildlife refuge in what is now known as the Land Between the Lakes.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry & Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 July 9 & 1979 June 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH037
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Harrell, Sadie (part 1)
Biographical note: Sadie Harrell was a resident of the Land Between the Lakes region from her birth in Stewart County, Tennessee in 1898 until her and husband’s displacement in 1965. She went to school in Rushing Creek in Stewart County and to high school at Model. She taught at Rushing Creek and Ginger Creek in Stewart County.
Description: Sadie Harrell discusses her knowledge of one room schools in both Stewart County, Tennessee and Trigg County, Kentucky. She relates her experiences in the school system from the time of her attendance until the end of her teaching career. She also describes her experiences in the boating and motel business that she and her husband operated.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 June 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH049
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Harrell, Sadie (part 2)
Biographical note: Sadie Harrell was a resident of the Land Between the Lakes region from her birth in Stewart County, Tennessee in 1898 until her and husband’s displacement in 1965. She went to school in Rushing Creek in Stewart County and to high school at Model. She taught at Rushing Creek and Ginger Creek in Stewart County.
Description: Sadie Harrell discusses her knowledge of one room schools in both Stewart County, Tennessee and Trigg County, Kentucky. She relates her experiences in the school system from the time of her attendance until the end of her teaching career. She also describes her experiences in the boating and motel business that she and her husband operated.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 June 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH049
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hamilton, Thomas (part 2)
Biographical note: Thomas Hamilton was born in Marshall County, Kentucky in 1896. He lived in the Land Between the Lakes region on his family farm on the banks of the Tennessee River. He dropped out of school in the fourth grade and spent most of his youth hunting and working on his father’s farm. As a young man Hamilton worked as a migrant worker and was employed in other states in the American southeast. He returned to Kentucky and bought a farm at Birmingham where he continued to farm until his retirement.
Description: Thomas Hamilton discusses farming and farm life from 1910 to 1970. He recalls his early experiences as a farmer and discloses methods and equipment used during the first half of the 20th Century. He explains marketing techniques and the agitation that arose over low prices. Hamilton describes social events, transportation and domestic life in the region. He also offers a detailed account of his trips to the cotton and rice fields of Alabama and Mississippi to find work. He is also mentions the Night Riders and the Moonshine industry in the Land Between the Lakes region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH048
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hamilton, Thomas (part 1)
Biographical note: Thomas Hamilton was born in Marshall County, Kentucky in 1896. He lived in the Land Between the Lakes region on his family farm on the banks of the Tennessee River. He dropped out of school in the fourth grade and spent most of his youth hunting and working on his father’s farm. As a young man Hamilton worked as a migrant worker and was employed in other states in the American southeast. He returned to Kentucky and bought a farm at Birmingham where he continued to farm until his retirement.
Description: Thomas Hamilton discusses farming and farm life from 1910 to 1970. He recalls his early experiences as a farmer and discloses methods and equipment used during the first half of the 20th Century. He explains marketing techniques and the agitation that arose over low prices. Hamilton describes social events, transportation and domestic life in the region. He also offers a detailed account of his trips to the cotton and rice fields of Alabama and Mississippi to find work. He is also mentions the Night Riders and the Moonshine industry in the Land Between the Lakes region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH048
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Miller, Floy
Biographical note: Floy Miller was born in 1895 near Golden Pond, Kentucky. Miller grew up on her father’s farm and attended public schools at Golden Pond and Fenton. She later studied at Bowling Green State Teachers College. After receiving her teaching certificate in 1915, she taught at the Pleasant Valley School in Livingston County. In 1921, Miller decided to quit teaching and relocated outside of the Land Between the Lakes region. She briefly reflects on the Night Rider raids of 1907 and 1908.
Description: Floy Miller, who was a resident of the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky for over twenty-six years, discusses her experiences during the early part of the 20th Century. She describes former residents of Golden Pond and their occupations, the problems associated with transportation and communication in the region and significant incidents that affected her life. She also mentions the river boats, local churches and the general stores.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 1976 June 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH059
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Wallace, Geneva (part 1)
Biographical note: Geneva Wallace grew up on a small farm in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. She attended a one room school at Woodson Chapel and graduated Cadiz High School in 1926. After graduation, she attended Murray State College and two years later received a certificate to teach high school. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1932.
Description: Geneva Wallace discusses her teaching career, the schools where she was employed and the various subjects she taught. She describes how the Tennessee Valley Authority formed the Land Between the Lakes region and how it affected the lives of the people that resided there for generations. She also details the effects of relocation on her and her husband.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH072
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Wallace, Geneva (part 2)
Biographical note: Geneva Wallace grew up on a small farm in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. She attended a one room school at Woodson Chapel and graduated Cadiz High School in 1926. After graduation, she attended Murray State College and two years later received a certificate to teach high school. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1932.
Description: Geneva Wallace discusses her teaching career, the schools where she was employed and the various subjects she taught. She describes how the Tennessee Valley Authority formed the Land Between the Lakes region and how it affected the lives of the people that resided there for generations. She also details the effects of relocation on her and her husband.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1976 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH072
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Whitford, Christine (part 1)
Biographical note: Christine Griffin Whitford was born in September of 1913 at Model, Tennessee. In 1933, she received an appointment at the Hutchen School and began a teaching career that would span nearly thirty years and include more than half dozen schools.
Description: Christine Whitford discusses her teaching experience ranging from a one room school house to the elementary school at Dover, Tennessee. In this interview, she recalls administrative and employment practices, classroom methods and school activities. Her recollections include her father’s position as a rural rout carrier for the United States Postal Service, the nature of a small community and social lifestyle’s in the 1910s and 1920s. In addition to providing information about the educational facilities on the Land Between the Lakes, she also reflects upon the complexities of a women’s role in the middle part of the 20th Century.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH074
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Whitford, Christine (part 2)
Biographical note: Christine Griffin Whitford was born in September of 1913 at Model, Tennessee. In 1933, she received an appointment at the Hutchen School and began a teaching career that would span nearly thirty years and include more than half dozen schools.
Description: Christine Whitford discusses her teaching experience ranging from a one room school house to the elementary school at Dover, Tennessee. In this interview, she recalls administrative and employment practices, classroom methods and school activities. Her recollections include her father’s position as a rural rout carrier for the United States Postal Service, the nature of a small community and social lifestyle’s in the 1910s and 1920s. In addition to providing information about the educational facilities on the Land Between the Lakes, she also reflects upon the complexities of a women’s role in the middle part of the 20th Century.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH074
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part 4)
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part 1)
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part )
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part 3)
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 2)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 3)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 4)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Joyce, Thelbert (part 2)
Biographical note: Thelbert Joyce was born in Trigg County, Kentucky at Golden Pond on July 30, 1918. He resided in Trigg County, Kentucky his most of his life. He was a member of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church.
Description: Thelbert Joyce discusses the following topics; the origin of the community names of Jenny Ridge and Fungo; the history of Ferguson Springs Baptist Church; early funeral services and hearses; description of coffins; tilling corn; cleaning and dressing corps; outdoor baptizing; revivals; preaching styles; hard-shell debates; excommunication; old magistrate laws; ministers working outside the church; ordaining ministers; closed communion; wine and blackberry juice for communion; the alter of prayer; and the effect of sugar Whiskey on the church and community.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1976 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH054
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lancaster, Helen (part 1)
Biographical note: Helen Lancaster was born January 12, 1913 in the Snyder community of Stewart County, Tennessee. She graduated Dover High School and attended Murray State Teachers College for two years. She taught at the Blue Spring School and later served as principal at the Tharpe School in the Land Between the Lakes area of Stewart County, Tennessee. Her father, Emanuel Spiceland, was both a general store owner and a teacher.
Description: Helen Lancaster discusses teaching and social conditions in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee from the 1920s to the 1950s. She recalls the competition for teaching assignments, living arrangements for rural teachers, the student enrollments of rural schools and the salaries of teachers. She also describes her subsequent teaching appointments, responsibilities as principal at the Tharpe School and comments on the decline of enrollment in rural schools. She also discussed warnings given by certain community members to her grandfather to stop boarding African-Americans at his home and litigations against Tennessee Valley Authority prior to the creation of the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH056
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Joyce, Otis
Biographical note: Otis Joyce was born in Golden Pond, Kentucky. He was raised in the Land Between the Lakes area of Kentucky and lived there until his property was purchased by the Tennessee Valley Authority. He resided at Hemitite until the Tennessee Valley Authority purchased his property. Joyce and his wife were active members of the Hemitite Methodist Church in Center Furnace, Kentucky.
Description: Otis Joyce discusses the following topics: the method of membership in the Methodist church; the Methodist mode of sprinkling or pouring; baptism by emersion; church members being embalmed after 1930; opening the church doors; six week revivals; visiting ministers; homecoming; ministers being sent by the conference; comparisons between Methodist and Baptist preaching styles; the church offering; communion; the alter of prayer; Sunday afternoon dinners and fellowship; business meetings; care of the combined parsonage; and the quarterly conference of the four churches in the region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1976 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH053
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lancaster, Helen (part 2)
Biographical note: Helen Lancaster was born January 12, 1913 in the Snyder community of Stewart County, Tennessee. She graduated Dover High School and attended Murray State Teachers College for two years. She taught at the Blue Spring School and later served as principal at the Tharpe School in the Land Between the Lakes area of Stewart County, Tennessee. Her father, Emanuel Spiceland, was both a general store owner and a teacher.
Description: Helen Lancaster discusses teaching and social conditions in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee from the 1920s to the 1950s. She recalls the competition for teaching assignments, living arrangements for rural teachers, the student enrollments of rural schools and the salaries of teachers. She also describes her subsequent teaching appointments, responsibilities as principal at the Tharpe School and comments on the decline of enrollment in rural schools. She also discussed warnings given by certain community members to her grandfather to stop boarding African-Americans at his home and litigations against Tennessee Valley Authority prior to the creation of the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH056
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Joyce, Thelbert (part 1)
Biographical note: Thelbert Joyce was born in Trigg County, Kentucky at Golden Pond on July 30, 1918. He resided in Trigg County, Kentucky his most of his life. He was a member of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church.
Description: Thelbert Joyce discusses the following topics; the origin of the community names of Jenny Ridge and Fungo; the history of Ferguson Springs Baptist Church; early funeral services and hearses; description of coffins; tilling corn; cleaning and dressing corps; outdoor baptizing; revivals; preaching styles; hard-shell debates; excommunication; old magistrate laws; ministers working outside the church; ordaining ministers; closed communion; wine and blackberry juice for communion; the alter of prayer; and the effect of sugar Whiskey on the church and community.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1976 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH054
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Timberlake, Clarence L. (part 1)
Biographical note: Clarence L. Timberlake was an African American activist who sought to improve and expand educational opportunities for black Kentuckians during the early and mid 20th Century. He was born in Fleming County, Kentucky in 1885. He graduated from Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Simmons University in 1930. Timberlake established a four year high school in Madisonville and teacher training schools at Pembroke and Greenville, Kentucky. He also organized Kentucky Negro Farmers Conferences from 1914 to 1948 and was president of West Kentucky Vocational School at Paducah from 1948 to 1957. He authored numerous pamphlets and articles on African American education, Kentucky politics and civil rights. He later was successful in sponsoring the first two black students from Kentucky to attend West Point Military Academy. He died in 1979.
Description: Clarence L. Timberlake discusses his life and interactions with Earle C. Clements. He discusses civil rights, public service and the Flood of 1937. He describes race relations in Kentucky from the 1920s to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. He offers an eyewitness account of the 27th Annual Convention of the National Negro Educational Conference in Kansas City, where he was elected vice president. Timberlake explains his role in the development of West Kentucky Vocational School and the Negro Farmers Association. The recording concludes with his opinions on the Roots mini-series and book.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 22 and 1977 April 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH167
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Timberlake, Clarence L. (part 2)
Biographical note: Clarence L. Timberlake was an African American activist who sought to improve and expand educational opportunities for black Kentuckians during the early and mid 20th Century. He was born in Fleming County, Kentucky in 1885. He graduated from Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Simmons University in 1930. Timberlake established a four year high school in Madisonville and teacher training schools at Pembroke and Greenville, Kentucky. He also organized Kentucky Negro Farmers Conferences from 1914 to 1948 and was president of West Kentucky Vocational School at Paducah from 1948 to 1957. He authored numerous pamphlets and articles on African American education, Kentucky politics and civil rights. He later was successful in sponsoring the first two black students from Kentucky to attend West Point Military Academy. He died in 1979.
Description: Clarence L. Timberlake discusses his life and interactions with Earle C. Clements. He discusses civil rights, public service and the Flood of 1937. He describes race relations in Kentucky from the 1920s to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. He offers an eyewitness account of the 27th Annual Convention of the National Negro Educational Conference in Kansas City, where he was elected vice president. Timberlake explains his role in the development of West Kentucky Vocational School and the Negro Farmers Association. The recording concludes with his opinions on the Roots mini-series and book.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 22 and 1977 April 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH167
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Spiceland, Clyde
Biographical note: Clyde Spiceland was born in 1905, in the Snyder community of Stewart County, Tennessee. He was one of ten children, nine of whom entered the teaching profession. He graduated Dover High School in 1924. Soon afterwards, he received his first teaching appointment at the Bell Wood School. His teaching career covered 41 years, 38 of which were devoted to the Stewart County Educational institutions. His last position in the Land Between the Lakes region was at the Model School at Model, Tennessee, where he both taught and served as principal.
Description: Clyde Spiceland discusses his teaching career in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee from the 1920s to the 1960s. He describes the teaching positions he held, the location of those appointments, his responsibilities and his assessment of the one room schoolhouse in rural communities. Spiceland comments upon graduation ceremonies, standardized testing and the availability of books for students. Due to the extent and length of his evolvement with Stewart County schools, he is able to recall certificate requirements, salary increases, employment practices and the gradual movement toward consolidation of schools. On the personal side, Spiceland adds some illuminating details to the history of his family as well as personal memories on various incidents.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 November 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH070
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Martin, Homer
Biographical note: Homer Martin was born on April 4, 1898 at Standing Rock in Stewart County, Tennessee. He relocated to Fort Henry in 1928, where he later co-owned and operated the Fort Henry General Store. Due to the Great Depression and their liberal extension of credit to customers, the store was unable to rebound financially and went bankrupt in 1943. When the Fort Henry community was relocated to higher ground following the creation of the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area, the Martin’s reopened the general store which remained in operation until 1966.
Description: Homer Martin discusses the role of a general store in rural Tennessee during the first half of the 20th Century. He provides information on the inventory of a general store, dealing with the various sellers and suppliers and observing buying patterns of the regions populace. He also describes the importance of a general store to community affairs and social functions in a small southern town.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 October 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH060
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Martin, Sallie (part 2)
Biographical note: Sallie Martin was born in Stewart County, Tennessee in 1901. She resided at the Standing Rock community and began teaching at Stewart County High School in 1919 at the age of eighteen. She later relocated to Murray, Kentucky and enrolled at Murray State Teachers College. After receiving her degree she returned to Tennessee and taught at Fort Henry and Dover until her retirement in 1966.
Description: Sallie Martin discusses her experiences as a social sciences teacher and teacher-principal at Dover Elementary School. She recalls administrative and employment practices, classroom methods and school activities. Her recollections of individual experiences with children are interwoven with descriptions of physical school facilities and teaching aids.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 October 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH061
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Martin, Sallie (part 1)
Biographical note: Sallie Martin was born in Stewart County, Tennessee in 1901. She resided at the Standing Rock community and began teaching at Stewart County High School in 1919 at the age of eighteen. She later relocated to Murray, Kentucky and enrolled at Murray State Teachers College. After receiving her degree she returned to Tennessee and taught at Fort Henry and Dover until her retirement in 1966.
Description: Sallie Martin discusses her experiences as a social sciences teacher and teacher-principal at Dover Elementary School. She recalls administrative and employment practices, classroom methods and school activities. Her recollections of individual experiences with children are interwoven with descriptions of physical school facilities and teaching aids.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 October 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH061
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nance, Nancy (part 1)
Biographical note: Nancy Nance was born at Standing Rock in Stewart County, Tennessee on October 19, 1899. She attended the Mulberry Hill School near Kentucky Lake. She married and relocated near Fort Henry, Tennessee in 1922 where her husband owned and operated a farmed.
Description: Nancy Nance discusses the various customs, activities and attitudes that marked the family life of a young woman in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee. Her recollections include comments on courting practices, quilting, church events and various home remedies. She delineates what chores were expected of women, as well as which events and entertainment programs were specifically for women. She also discusses gardening practices, weaving, candle making and other crafts learned from earlier generations of her family.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 September 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH064
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nance, Nancy (part 2)
Biographical note: Nancy Nance was born at Standing Rock in Stewart County, Tennessee on October 19, 1899. She attended the Mulberry Hill School near Kentucky Lake. She married and relocated near Fort Henry, Tennessee in 1922 where her husband owned and operated a farmed.
Description: Nancy Nance discusses the various customs, activities and attitudes that marked the family life of a young woman in the Land Between the Lakes region of Tennessee. Her recollections include comments on courting practices, quilting, church events and various home remedies. She delineates what chores were expected of women, as well as which events and entertainment programs were specifically for women. She also discusses gardening practices, weaving, candle making and other crafts learned from earlier generations of her family.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 September 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH064
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Askew, Winnie
Biographical note: Winnie Herndon Askew was born in September of 1919 in Trigg County, Kentucky. She was a daughter of a share cropper. She lived in various locations on the Land Between the Lakes, including Model, Tennessee and the area adjoining Bethlehem Church, Tennessee. She and her husband, Thomas Askew, farmed the area of land where the present buffalo range is located at the national park.
Description: Winnie Askew explores the routines and attitudes that marked the daily life of a homemaker during the 1940s on the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. She recalls chores such as doing laundry, washing dishes, ironing and processing vegetables and fruit for storage. She also details gardening practices and the insects and pests with which confronted gardeners. Of particular interest are her recollections of how pillows were made, how materials were dyed and several other home crafts. She also discusses home remedies and provides incites into some of the social structures associated with women living and working on the Land Between the Lakes.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hopkins, Margaret
Date of interview: 1976 September 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH035
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Allen, Bobby
Biographical note: Bobby Allen was the principal of East Calloway County Elementary School near Murray, Kentucky. He resided in the Land Between the Lakes region in the 1940s and 1950s.Bobby Allen was born in Cadiz, Kentucky on August 8, 1941. He lived in Land Between the Lakes region until adulthood.
Description: Bobby Allen discusses the following events; “Colored Day” at Cadiz; the first black person met; his place of birth; river baptisms; revival services; a typical Sunday service; transportation to church; corn and tobacco crops; Sunday school and Bible school; church attendance; ministers’ other occupations; the “Holy Rollers”; his fathers “pinhooking” for a living; foreign ministries; dog bread for communion; the amen corner; the alter of prayer; church business meetings; a description of a brush arbor; and the preaching of Reverend Wads Cunningham.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 April 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH032
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nelson, Lynn E. and Edith
Biographical note:
Description: Lynn E. Nelson and his wife Edith discuss their life experiences in Marshall County, Kentucky. He recalls his years as a farmer, describing the crops he raised, the first tractor he operated, the number of acres he tended with mules, the travel time from Benton to Paducah by wagon and briefly mentions agriculture based organizations. They reflect upon the old town of Benton and describe businesses, the creation of paved streets and sidewalks, public utilities and medical care available in the town. They comment on Tater Day as an event to encourage the trade of goods in the community.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Edwards, Alma R
Date of interview: 1977 April 5
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH109
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cunningham, Wade (part 1)
Biographical note: Wade Cunningham was a Baptist preacher from Trigg County, Kentucky. He was born in Trigg County in 1905. He preached a number of years at the Cumberland Baptist Church at Cumberland, Kentucky prior the community’s acclamation by the Tennessee Valley Authority. He later preached at Baptist churches in Maple Grove and Blue Spring.
Description: Wade Cunningham discusses the activities of the Baptist Church in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. His recollections include: the churches and places where he preached; the length of sermons; the types of church functions; Sunday school; church music; homecomings; half-time churches; tent revivals; selection of pastors; his hospital and home ministry; business meetings and controversial issues such as wine versus grape juice in the communion service, whether to use a baptistery or a creek, closed communion and church exclusions for distilling whiskey, drinking alcohol and dancing.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 February 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH045
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cunningham, Wade (part 2)
Biographical note: Wade Cunningham was a Baptist preacher from Trigg County, Kentucky. He was born in Trigg County in 1905. He preached a number of years at the Cumberland Baptist Church at Cumberland, Kentucky prior the community’s acclamation by the Tennessee Valley Authority. He later preached at Baptist churches in Maple Grove and Blue Spring.
Description: Wade Cunningham discusses the activities of the Baptist Church in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. His recollections include: the churches and places where he preached; the length of sermons; the types of church functions; Sunday school; church music; homecomings; half-time churches; tent revivals; selection of pastors; his hospital and home ministry; business meetings and controversial issues such as wine versus grape juice in the communion service, whether to use a baptistery or a creek, closed communion and church exclusions for distilling whiskey, drinking alcohol and dancing.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 February 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH045
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Colston, Lillian
Biographical note: Lillian Colston was born in 1913 and resided a majority of her life in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. She was a lifelong member of Ferguson Springs Baptist Church.
Description: Lillian Colston discusses the following: lighting in the church; homemade pews; funeral services; digging graves; the funeral hearse; places and modes of baptism; graded Sunday schools; conducting revivals; where evangelists stayed in the community; a typical Sunday service; annual revivals; monthly church services; homecomings; pastors’ salaries; Sunday afternoon activities; exclusion of members for drinking; business meetings and how the change of church location helped attendance. She also recalls and discusses all three locations of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH042
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Allen, Randolph
Biographical note: Randolph Allen was born in Christian County, Kentucky in 1919. He worked as a farmer until he attended Moody Bible Institute located in Chicago, Illinois. He was a long term pastor of the Golden Pond Baptist Church at Golden Pond, Kentucky. He served as pastor when the Tennessee Valley Authority began purchasing land in the region. The T.V.A. would eventually acquired the church property.
Description: Randolph Allen discusses the following items: local baseball; vacation bible school; dinners on the church grounds; church music and finances; selecting ministers; “shouting” in the church; primitive Baptist influence; the church offering; dinner at the home of parishioners; the effects of moonshine and the reluctance of locals to accept outsiders.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 March 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH033
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Colston, Howard (part 2)
Biographical note: Howard Colston was born in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. He resided, except for a brief period of time when he worked elsewhere, in the area until the Tennessee Valley Authority purchased his property. He was a lifelong member of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church.
Description: Howard Colston discusses his recollections as a member of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church at Benton, Kentucky. He recalls his baptism, tent revivals, business meetings, styles of preaching and other church activities. He also offers a visual description of the church, the church ministers and interesting members of the congregation.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH041
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Colston, Howard (part1)
Biographical note: Howard Colston was born in the Land Between the Lakes region of Kentucky. He resided, except for a brief period of time when he worked elsewhere, in the area until the Tennessee Valley Authority purchased his property. He was a lifelong member of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church.
Description: Howard Colston discusses his recollections as a member of the Ferguson Springs Baptist Church at Benton, Kentucky. He recalls his baptism, tent revivals, business meetings, styles of preaching and other church activities. He also offers a visual description of the church, the church ministers and interesting members of the congregation.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Fisk, Sammy
Date of interview: 1977 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH041
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Parker, Beulah, Mrs.
Biographical note:
Description: Beulah Parker discusses her life experiences in the Oak Valley community of Marshall County, Kentucky. She recalls making soap, early radios and social life in the community. She describes transportation by horse and buggy, Model T automobiles and sleighs during the winter months. She mentions the school, tobacco and cotton farming, the old courthouse and a story on who may have set fire to the building.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Lewis, Joey
Date of interview: 1977 November 11
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH188
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Woodruff, Gilbert
Biographical note:
Description: Gilbert Woodruff discusses his life in western Kentucky during the early half of the 20th century. He recalls working in the construction industry and describes regional foods. He discusses the making of moonshine whiskey, how the stills were made, how operators were alerted to the presence of revenue agents and the transportation and sale of moonshine. He recalls hunting turkey and fur bearing animals, how turkey was cooked, mentions companies that purchased furs and describes the making of turkey wing fans. Other topics discussed include his childhood, public schools, activities and customs in rural Kentucky.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Sirls, Barbara
Date of interview: 1977 October 19
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: York, Ethel Loretta Hill
Biographical note:
Description: Loretta York discusses her life experiences in Marshall County, Kentucky. She offers a brief history of the Collie family. She recalls local businesses in the community of Birmingham. She recounts the life of her grandmother, Cora Nanney. Other topics discussed in the interview include farming practices during the turn of the 20th century in rural Marshall County and early events in Birmingham.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, John
Date of interview: 1978 June 27
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH209
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lucas, Homer Cage (part 1)
Biographical note:
Description: Homer Lucas discusses his life experiences in Marshall County, Kentucky. He recounts his service in the United States Army Air Corps during World War I Army in France. He recalls Night Rider incidents in Benton and Birmingham and early businesses in Benton. He describes the 1915 burning of the County court House and serving as a United States Marshall during the 1922 railroad strike, which included an incident at Central City. He mentions other incidents that occurred while he served as deputy sheriff. He remembers a single African-American businessman, named Boy Ford, in Benton. He briefly mentions the first automobile in Benton, entertainment in the town, hand pulled and horse drawn fire wagons. He describes a train nicknamed "Whiskey Dick" that people used to bring whiskey to the Benton area during Prohibition.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, John
Date of interview: 1978 June 28
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH230
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Marshall County - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Rayburn, John
Biographical note:
Description: John Rayburn discusses his life experiences in Benton, Kentucky. He recalls the veterinarians that practiced in the city along with other businessmen in Benton. He remembers Galen Hobson Gough a Marshall County native and considered one of the world's strongest men. He mentions Tater Day in Benton, including the livestock sales, food stands, visiting medicine men and amusement shows. He describes the business of selling horse hides. He also recounts how African-Americans were driven out of Birmingham and the later success of African-American businessman in Benton. He comments on his early life and work as a blacksmith.
Descriptors: Marshall County (Ky.) -- History.
Interviewed by: McClorie, Robert
Date of interview: 1978 March 3
Contributed by: Marshall County Oral History Project.
Identification number: MCOH198
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ratcliff, Lizzie
Biographical note: Lizzie Ratcliff was born in Marshall County in 1895. Her parents were Lucy Randolph and Ed Story. Her father cut railroad ties and constructed houses. He also farmed corn, peas and hay and bred mules and cows. She attended the Said Road School until the 8th grade. She attended Lee’s Chapel as a child and later Burks Chapel in Paducah. She was a homemaker and provided house cleaning services.
Description: Lizzie Ratcliff discusses her life as African American in southwestern Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. She describes attending rural public schools in Marshall County, Kentucky and residing in a predominantly white community. She recalls playing baseball and attending neighborhood parties and dances. She mentions race relations within the community and that between black and white families frequently socialized with one another. She provides a description of her neighborhood, family friends and nearby communities. She reflects on the importance of the church, the profession of midwifery and her experiences in Paducah later in her life.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Marable, Addie
Date of interview: 1979
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH133
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bunch, Shirley (part 2)
Biographical note: Shirley Bunch was born on June 22, 1940. Her parents were Leola and Matthew McCally. She attended Rosary Chapel Catholic School from elementary to high school. She was the first and only student to graduate that high school in 1958. After high school, she attended Paducah Junior College. Her husband, William Bunch, became the first African American police deputy in McCracken County in December of 1969. In 1973, she attended the Paducah Tilghman Trade School and afterwards worked at Lourdes Hospital. She then took a leave of absence in 1976 to return to Paducah Community College to finish her degree. Following graduation she worked at Brookport Elementary School in Illinois. In 1978, Bunch worked as the first black female deputy at the McCracken County Police Department. She was a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the first female president of the Paducah Association for Motivation Progress, Education and Rehabilitation (PAMPER) and a board member on of the Paducah Community Center.
Description: Shirley Bunch describes attending segregated schools from elementary to high school in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s. She recalls that African Americans began attending Paducah Junior College in 1955. She discusses her career, travels and marriage. She recounts places of employment, offices held and professional and community achievements she acquired during her lifetime. She mentions the medical practices administered at Paducah’s Lourdes Hospital during the early 1970s. She also describes mentoring black children struggling with segregation issues.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH137b
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bunch, Shirley (part 1)
Biographical note: Shirley Bunch was born on June 22, 1940. Her parents were Leola and Matthew McCally. She attended Rosary Chapel Catholic School from elementary to high school. She was the first and only student to graduate that high school in 1958. After high school, she attended Paducah Junior College. Her husband, William Bunch, became the first African American police deputy in McCracken County in December of 1969. In 1973, she attended the Paducah Tilghman Trade School and afterwards worked at Lourdes Hospital. She then took a leave of absence in 1976 to return to Paducah Community College to finish her degree. Following graduation she worked at Brookport Elementary School in Illinois. In 1978, Bunch worked as the first black female deputy at the McCracken County Police Department. She was a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the first female president of the Paducah Association for Motivation Progress, Education and Rehabilitation (PAMPER) and a board member on of the Paducah Community Center.
Description: Shirley Bunch describes attending segregated schools from elementary to high school in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s. She recalls that African Americans began attending Paducah Junior College in 1955. She discusses her career, travels and marriage. She recounts places of employment, offices held and professional and community achievements she acquired during her lifetime. She mentions the medical practices administered at Paducah’s Lourdes Hospital during the early 1970s. She also describes mentoring black children struggling with segregation issues.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH137b
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Larson, Robert
Biographical note: Robert Larson was born to parents Seaman and Mary Larson in 1921 in Paducah, Kentucky. He attended segregated public schools in Paducah, including Garfield School and Lincoln High School. He graduated from high school in 1939 and attended summer sessions of West Kentucky Vocational School. He served in the United States military during World War II. At the time of the interview, he was employed in sales in Indianapolis, Indiana. Larson died in Indianapolis on April 10, 2002.
Description: Robert Larson began the interview by describing his early life in Paducah, Kentucky. He recounts his teachers, coaches, and classmates at the Garfield School and Lincoln High School in Paducah. He explains the changes in Paducah since his childhood in the 1920s and 1930s in terms of education and housing for African Americans. He discusses his reasons for approving affirmative action. He tells of the evacuation and relocation of Paducah residents during the Flood of 1937 and how the experience was an adventure for the youth. He mentions attending West Kentucky Vocational School during summer sessions. He feels that discrimination and prejudice toward African Americans will be improved due to continued racial integration in education. He cites his experience in the United States military during World War II as teaching him how to be flexible and adapt to being in environments with people from different cultures. He ends by describing the value of the education which he received in his youth in Paducah and the teachers who helped to shape him.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 August 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH255
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Massie, William H.
Biographical note: William Harweda Massie was born on January 21, 1929 in Paducah, Kentucky. His parents were Robert and Mattie Massie, a taxi operator and school teacher, respectively. He completed elementary, junior high, and high school at the all-black Lincoln School, in Paducah. He graduated from Lincoln School in 1946 and began that fall at Winston-Salem Teachers College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. After two years in North Carolina, he transferred to Kentucky State College in Frankfort, Kentucky to study sociology and economics. He graduated from Kentucky State College but was not able to find a job in social work in the Jackson Purchase area. He obtained a social studies and band teaching position in 1950 at a segregated high school in Caruthersville, Missouri. In 1951, he was drafted into the United States Army. Massie served in the Army for a total of two years and was stationed in Germany for eighteen months as an administrator and teacher. He returned in 1953 and began graduate work at the University of Illinois at Urbana. After obtaining his Master degree, he taught history for a year at a junior college in Buford, Mississippi. His next spent five years at Rosenwald High School in Fairmont, North Carolina. He left Fairmont to return to his hometown of Paducah in 1960, when the schools in Fairmont were in the process of desegregating. When he wasn’t able to find work in Paducah, he moved to Chicago, Illinois and later Gary, Indiana for employment.
Description: William Massie began the interview with biographical and occupational information related to his parents and siblings. He recounts his teachers and memories at Lincoln School in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1930s and 1940s. He explains his reasons for attending Winston-Salem Teachers College, including his connections to coach Clarence Gains, the lack of other schools to attend and the music scholarship he received during his first year at the school. He recalled why he transferred to Kentucky State College and his decision to pursue social work and teaching. He describes his first teaching experience in Caruthersville, Missouri before being drafted into the United States Army. He was stationed in Germany as a teacher and school administrator. He provides insight into the devastation felt by the German people following World War II. Massie also recounts incidences of racial prejudice against him in Germany. Following his return to the United States, he taught history at the University of Illinois at Urbana. He recalled that his most rewarding years as a teacher were at Rosenwald High School in Fairmont, North Carolina. In terms of economic and social advancement in the Paducah by 1960, Massie believed that the conditions for African Americans were improved but that opportunities in professional fields were severely limited. He recounted his family’s experience as refugees during the Paducah Flood of 1937. He provides further biographical information on his parents, including their birthplaces, education, occupations and church activities. He concluded the interview with background and occupational information on his wife, Linda Jessie Moore Massie.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 August 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH259
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Amos, Eloise Broady
Biographical note: Born in 1929 to James and Mary Broady, Eloise Marie Broady Amos grew up in Paducah and attended all black schools. After she graduated from high school in 1946, Amos worked at a Paducah general store and later a hospital. She was the first African American to attend Paducah Junior College, which originally banned the acceptance of African Americans. She obtained employment as a clerk at various institutions in Paducah before moving to Louisville with her new husband. She worked at the University of Louisville and attended night classes in Secretarial Science. From 1968 to 1970, she taught high school business classes before obtaining two sequential positions with the Louisville Board of Education. She returned to teaching high school due to the need for African American teachers as a result of the desegregation of Louisville public schools and required busing in 1975. She obtained two more graduate degrees from Western Kentucky University, a Master of Arts in Secondary Guidance and Counseling in 1976 and another in Administration Supervision in 1979. She continued teaching business at the high school level in Jefferson County until her retirement in 1989.
Description: Eloise B. Amos discusses what education was like for African Americans in the public schools of McCracken County, Kentucky during the 1930s and 1940s and her struggle against the racist status quo to gain admittance to Paducah Junior College (presently West Kentucky Community and Technical College. She described her family’s experiences during the flood of 1937. She also details the chaos and riots against desegregation following the court imposed 1975 Louisville busing program.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 August 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH231
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bohannon, Frederick
Biographical note: Frederick Bohannon was born on April 29, 1913 in Paducah, Kentucky to George Bohannon and Marie Lovett. His family moved frequently. His first move was at age five to East St. Louis, Illinois, which led to his family being caught in the vicious race riots of 1917. Before he turned six, his family returned to Paducah where he entered Lincoln Elementary, the only public school which African Americans were allowed to attend. He later relocated to Fort Wayne, Indiana and then Cleveland, Ohio. He attended integrated schools in both cities. His family again returned to Paducah, where Bohannon finished junior high and high school and later attended West Kentucky Industrial College. In 1935, he married and moved to South Bend, Indiana. In 1960, he entered the real estate business in South Bend and in 1979 was the only African American in the city who owned a real estate company. He died in Peoria, Illinois on May 15, 1998 at the age of 85.
Description: Frederick Bohannon describes the conditions of segregated public schools in Paducah in the early half of the 20th century. He compares the Paducah schools to integrated schools in Fort Wayne, Indiana and Cleveland, Ohio. He recalled his family’s experiences during the 1917 race riots in East St. Louis, Illinois and the evacuation of citizens during the Paducah Flood of 1937.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary F.
Date of interview: 1979 August 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH234
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Gaines, Clarence (part 1)
Biographical note: Clarence Edward “Big House” Gaines, Sr. was born on May 21, 1923 in Paducah, Kentucky to Lester and Olivia Gaines. He attended the segregated Lincoln School in Paducah. He was active in high school sports and lettered in football. He graduated high school in 1941 and attended Morgan College in Baltimore, Maryland on an athletic scholarship for basketball, football, and track. After graduating from Morgan College in 1945, he obtained a position as a math teacher and assistant coach at Winston-Salem Teachers College in Salem, North Carolina. In 1950, he married Clara Lucille Berry, a high school Latin teacher. He coached and served as the athletic director at the college for 47 years, and during that time was awarded the CIAA (Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association) Basketball Tournament Outstanding Coach Award eight times, CIAA Basketball Coach of the Year six times, and NCAA Division II College Coach of the Year in 1967. In that year, he coached the basketball team to a national championship to become the first historically Black college team to won a Division II title. His honors also included being inducted into the NAIA Helms Hall of Fame in 1968, CIAA Hall of Fame in 1975, North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 1978, and Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1982. He served as a basketball consultant for the United State Air Force, which led him to travel to Germany, England, and Mexico to teach workshops on coaching basketball. At the time of his retirement in 1993, Mr. Gaines held the record for the second most wins of a NCAA basketball coach, with a record of 828 wins to 446 losses. Gaines died on April 18, 2005 after suffering a stroke.
Description: Clarence Gaines recalled attending Lincoln Elementary School in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1930s. He describes incidents of African American children being assaulted by white children on the way to school. He mentioned his mother’s job at Paducah Cooperage Company where women performed manual labor. He spoke of his parents’ support of his athletic pursuits and the coaches at Lincoln High School that influenced him, including Buddy Ferrell, and Tommy Withrow. He described the small Lincoln High School band led by Director L. G. Milligan. He remembered how he learned of Morgan College in Baltimore, Maryland where he received an athletic scholarship. He described how he was recruited to become a coach and math teacher at Winston-Salem Teachers College in Salem, North Carolina. He discussed the athletic program at Winston-Salem, including the men’s basketball team’s accomplishments, his own awards and honors and the professional athletes Cleo Hill and Earl Monroe that came from the college. He mentioned his experiences holding coaching clinics in England, Germany, and Mexico and taking students to tournaments around the world. Gaines believed that Paducah, had not been as fast to change and develop in terms of social conditions for African Americans compared to other places he lived in or visited, including Salem. He cites disciplinary problems in African American youth which were caused by the integration of schools. He acknowledges his wife, parents, family, early coworkers and bosses and other individuals that influenced his life as keys to his success. His suggests the method for improving the standing of African Americans in society by encouraging a rededication and reestablishment of family in the black community.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 August 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH250
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Gaines, Clarence (part 2)
Biographical note: Clarence Edward “Big House” Gaines, Sr. was born on May 21, 1923 in Paducah, Kentucky to Lester and Olivia Gaines. He attended the segregated Lincoln School in Paducah. He was active in high school sports and lettered in football. He graduated high school in 1941 and attended Morgan College in Baltimore, Maryland on an athletic scholarship for basketball, football, and track. After graduating from Morgan College in 1945, he obtained a position as a math teacher and assistant coach at Winston-Salem Teachers College in Salem, North Carolina. In 1950, he married Clara Lucille Berry, a high school Latin teacher. He coached and served as the athletic director at the college for 47 years, and during that time was awarded the CIAA (Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association) Basketball Tournament Outstanding Coach Award eight times, CIAA Basketball Coach of the Year six times, and NCAA Division II College Coach of the Year in 1967. In that year, he coached the basketball team to a national championship to become the first historically Black college team to won a Division II title. His honors also included being inducted into the NAIA Helms Hall of Fame in 1968, CIAA Hall of Fame in 1975, North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 1978, and Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1982. He served as a basketball consultant for the United State Air Force, which led him to travel to Germany, England, and Mexico to teach workshops on coaching basketball. At the time of his retirement in 1993, Mr. Gaines held the record for the second most wins of a NCAA basketball coach, with a record of 828 wins to 446 losses. Gaines died on April 18, 2005 after suffering a stroke.
Description: Clarence Gaines recalled attending Lincoln Elementary School in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1930s. He describes incidents of African American children being assaulted by white children on the way to school. He mentioned his mother’s job at Paducah Cooperage Company where women performed manual labor. He spoke of his parents’ support of his athletic pursuits and the coaches at Lincoln High School that influenced him, including Buddy Ferrell, and Tommy Withrow. He described the small Lincoln High School band led by Director L. G. Milligan. He remembered how he learned of Morgan College in Baltimore, Maryland where he received an athletic scholarship. He described how he was recruited to become a coach and math teacher at Winston-Salem Teachers College in Salem, North Carolina. He discussed the athletic program at Winston-Salem, including the men’s basketball team’s accomplishments, his own awards and honors and the professional athletes Cleo Hill and Earl Monroe that came from the college. He mentioned his experiences holding coaching clinics in England, Germany, and Mexico and taking students to tournaments around the world. Gaines believed that Paducah, had not been as fast to change and develop in terms of social conditions for African Americans compared to other places he lived in or visited, including Salem. He cites disciplinary problems in African American youth which were caused by the integration of schools. He acknowledges his wife, parents, family, early coworkers and bosses and other individuals that influenced his life as keys to his success. His suggests the method for improving the standing of African Americans in society by encouraging a rededication and reestablishment of family in the black community.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 August 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH250
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Polk, Charles E.
Biographical note: Charles E. Polk was born in Paducah, Kentucky on May 19, 1927 to Charles and Mable Matchem Polk. He attended elementary school at the Garfield School on the north side of Paducah. From 1941 to 1944 he attended Paducah’s Lincoln High School. By 1949, he had moved to Illinois and took a civil service job. He attended college in Decatur, Illinois and lived there until 1961. During the 1950s, he was appointed to the housing authority of Decatur and later the National Urban Renewal Commission. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge since the 1940s and served as an Illinois State Grand Lodge Officer. After 1961, he worked in the management of various communication agencies. In 1965, he organized a consulting firm and five years later created a construction company that his only son managed at the time of the interview. He also helped to organize a bank, named Jersey Shore Bank, in New Jersey. In 1974, he received the Duke of Paducah Award. At the time of the interview, he operated a real estate management firm in addition to his management position in the United States Army Satellite Communication Agency.
Description: Charles Polk named his elementary teachers at the all-black Garfield School in Paducah, Kentucky. He acknowledged his principal, Mrs. Ross, as instilling a respect for women in the young boys and having a positive impact on his life. He also named his teachers at Lincoln High School in Paducah during the early 1940s and discussed their efforts to help him and others to achieve in all aspects of life. He named the Lincoln graduating class of 1944 and their locations and occupations at the time of the interview. He chronicled his jobs and college education in Decatur, Illinois after he left Paducah in the late 1940s. He described his involvement with the Masonic Lodge in Kentucky and Illinois. He mentioned his role in the creation of numerous businesses. He recounted the honors of receiving the Duke of Paducah Award in 1974. Polk reflected that living conditions in Paducah had improved since his youth. He concluded the interview with biographical information about his wife, only son, sisters, and parents.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary Sled
Date of interview: 1979 August 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH267
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Katie W.
Biographical note: Katie W. Freeman was born in Paducah, Kentucky in 1905. She attended segregated schools in Paducah, including Garfield Elementary School, Lincoln School, and the high school at West Kentucky Industrial College. In addition to West Kentucky Industrial College, she attended Fisk University, Provost Teachers College and a summer session at Northwestern University. She established a kindergarten at the Lincoln Court in Paducah and worked at West Kentucky Industrial College for nine years as the Recreational Supervising Counselor. She died on April 4, 1982 in Chicago, Illinois.
Description: Katie Freeman describes aspects of her experiences at the high school of the West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1920s. She recalls residing in the girls’ dormitory, the names of her instructor, the role of the school in her life and the financial difficulties she experienced while attending school. She discusses the changes in the social standing and opportunities for African Americans in Paducah during the 1970s as compared to when she was in high school in the 1920s. She mentions the establishment of a kindergarten in Paducah with the support of Mayor Robert Cherry. Freeman talks about her position at West Kentucky Industrial College as the Recreational Supervising Counselor, including her responsibilities of assisting students who were unaccustomed to hygiene products. She provides biographical information on her children and grandchildren. Lastly, she mentions a lynching incident in Paducah when she was eleven years old.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 August 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH248
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Rutter, Henrietta
Biographical note: Henrietta Rutter an African American educator and school administrator born on January 17, 1907 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She attended primary school in Pittsburgh. She completed her undergraduate education at Howard University, an all-black institution in Washington, D.C., and the University of Pittsburgh. She taught at a women’s college in Greensboro, North Carolina for three summers. She obtained her Master degree from the University of Pittsburgh. From 1934 to 1938, she served as the head critic teacher at West Kentucky Industrial College, a segregated normal school in Paducah, Kentucky. From 1938 to 1958, she taught in the Rowlandtown School in Paducah. When the school was consolidated with Northside School in 1958, she transferred to Northside and taught there for two years. In 1960, she became principal and sixth grade teacher of the new Southside School in Paducah. After she retired from teaching, she served on the Paducah Board of Education. At the time of the interview, she was involved with the Council of Organizations in Paducah. She died on November 22, 1995 at the age of 85 years old.
Description: Henrietta Rutter began the interview with biographical information on her parents. She explained the racial tensions in the Deep South which led her father to move from Georgia. Moving North afforded her more educational opportunities, including non-restricted access to public libraries and integrated primary, secondary and higher education. She highlighted her shock at the discrepancies between the economic and physical conditions of segregated Howard University and the University of Pittsburgh. She discussed the influence that her professors at the University of Pittsburgh had on her career as an educator. She recounted her experiences teaching in the Deep South for three years and then returning to the University of Pittsburgh for a graduate degree. She discussed a racial charged incident while shopping in Louisville, Kentucky that made her feel uncomfortable to remain in that area. While acknowledging that some African Americans were able to be very financially successful and respected in the South, Rutter noted that the majority of African Americans were not. She continued the interview by chronicling her teaching positions in Paducah, including four years at the segregated normal school of West Kentucky Industrial College, twenty years at the Rowlandtown School, two years at the consolidated Northside School and brief term as the principal and sixth grade teacher of Southside School. She named the teachers that she worked with at these institutions. She also provided her opinion on the importance of having subject specific teachers. She asserted that segregation in Paducah was doomed from the beginning since the division of Paducah’s limited funding between two separate school systems hurt all students. She concluded the interview by telling of her role on the Council of Organizations in Paducah and the council’s efforts to improve employment and protect human rights in the city.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary Sled
Date of interview: 1979 July 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH269
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Marable, Addie
Biographical note: Mrs. Addie Marable was born in McCracken County, Kentucky on February 28, 1904. She began her education at an all-black elementary school at the age of six years old. After graduating from eighth grade, she passed the teacher examination at the McCracken County Courthouse and received a teaching certificate. She attended West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah and graduated in 1928. She taught fifth grade at the all-black Garfield Elementary School in Paducah. When Paducah Schools were consolidated, she taught at the newly built Northside School. She died at the age of 83 on April 1, 1987 in Paducah.
Description: Addie Marable began by describing her elementary school education in the Jackson Purchase of Kentucky. She discussed the racial charged conflicts that occurred between white and black students on the way to school and the school facilities. Due to not having adequate textbooks, she mentioned how the students used catalogs, newspapers, and magazines to practice reading. She discussed the role of parents in education and discipline and recounted the teacher certification examination for McCracken County. She described West Kentucky Industrial College while she was a student there, how she was able to work her way through school. She described her first teaching job, which was at the segregated Garfield School in Paducah. She talks about social functions at the Garfield School, including Thanksgiving dinners, musicals, plays, and Christmas events. She recounted the building of the new school at Northside and the consolidation of some of the all-black elementary schools. She discussed the introduction of city lunch programs at Paducah Schools. She asserted that West Kentucky Industrial College helped to improve the quality of life for many African Americans in Paducah by expanding education. She concluded by telling how consolidation of McCracken County Schools caused some communities to decline in population as families moved closer to the consolidated schools.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 July 11
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH258
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Kindrick, Bradie S.
Biographical note: Bradie S. Kindrick was born in Almo, Calloway County, Kentucky about 1906. Her mother died when she was six years old. She attended Pleasant Hill School in Almo, Kentucky, beginning first grade at the age of six. She graduated from eighth grade at Pleasant Hill and attended Douglas High School in Murray, Kentucky for two years. In 1923, she began at West Kentucky Industrial College and graduated from high school in 1925. After obtaining her teachers certificate through a six week summer session at West Kentucky State College, she began teaching in Graves County. She also taught for one year in Ballard County. She graduated from the normal school of West Kentucky Industrial College in 1930. When African Americans were allowed to attend Murray State College, she enrolled. She graduated in 1958, making her the first of two African American women to graduate from Murray State with a Bachelor of Science degree. In all, she taught for thirty-seven years before retiring, with four of those years in an integrated school in Graves County.
Description: Bradie S. Kindrick began the interview by describing Pleasant Hill Elementary School, in Almo, Kentucky. She mentions attending Douglas High School in Murray, Kentucky for two years and West Kentucky Industrial College from 1923 to 1925. She chronicles her thirty-four years of teaching experiences in Graves County and Ballard County. She recounted her further education at West Kentucky State College, and Murray State College and being one of the first African Americans to graduate from Murray State with a Bachelor of Science degree. She discussed the process of school consolidation and integration in Graves County and provided her views on racial integration in schools. She observed that job opportunities for African Americans have expanded in Graves County and that racial relations have improved. She details the education and occupations of her grandchildren and her daughter.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 July 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH254
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cotton, Wilma
Biographical note: Wilma Fletcher Cotton lived from 1915 to 1999 in Paducah, Kentucky. Her parents were Richard Fletcher and Drusilla Clayton Fletcher. She attended two elementary schools in Paducah, the Arcadia Elementary School for six years and Rolling Town Elementary for two years. In 1929, she began high school for training at the all-black West Kentucky Industrial College. After graduating from high school and working for a time, she married Richard M. Cotton. Her husband was employed at the new West Kentucky Vocational Training School and eventually became the school’s Dean.
Description: Wilma Cotton provides an extensive physical description of Arcadia Elementary School and the high school at West Kentucky Industrial College at Paducah, Kentucky. She also recalls teachers from both schools that were influential in shaping her career as an educator. She outlines President D. H. Anderson’s role in the establishment of West Kentucky Industrial College. She divulges the financial situation of the Paducah neighborhood of Arcadia that she grew up in and how she was able to afford her education. She also describes common chores for young girls and modes of employment for female teenagers as house attendants.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, William
Date of interview: 1979 July 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH241
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Browne, B. W. (Birdius William)
Biographical note: Birdius William Brown was born on January 18, 1906 in Warsaw, Kentucky. He attended a one room school in Warsaw during his childhood years. He completed the eighth grade in Decatur, Illinois before returning to Warsaw. He attended high school in Frankfort, Kentucky followed by two years of normal school at Kentucky State College. His first teaching job was at a one-room school in Mt. Auburn, Kentucky. He relocated to Florida where he taught and later became president of the Melbourne High and Vocational School. He moved to Paducah and taught at Lincoln High School. He eventually became principal of the school. After the Lincoln High consolidated with Tilghman High School in 1965, he served as the Assistant Director of Curriculum and Guidance. Browne retired and operated a farm. He died at Paducah on November 1, 1986.
Description: B. W. (Birdius William) Browne highlights the benefits of a one-room school education from the perspective of a student and teacher. He describes his early childhood in Warsaw, Kentucky, teaching in segregated schools and his accomplishments as an educator and school administrator from the 1930s to the 1970s. He delves into the changing attitudes towards education and the contemporary lack of parental support of teachers leading to discipline problems in modern schools. He also discusses the influence and growth of the West Kentucky Vocational School at Paducah.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 July 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH236
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Chinn, Addie
Biographical note: Addie Mae Chinn was born at Paducah, Kentucky on April 2, 1909. She spent her childhood and early adulthood in Paducah. She attended public segregated schools and graduated from Lincoln High School in 1928. After graduation she attended West Kentucky Industrial College and afterwards relocated to Louisville with her husband, Henry Chinn, where they resided most of their lives. She became a noted African American missionary for the Baptist Church. She died on November 27, 2003.
Description: Addie Mae Chinn discusses segregation and being a student at Lincoln High School in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1920s. She mentions the teachers who most influenced her and her chosen career as a teacher and missionary. She recalls her experiences at West Kentucky Industrial College in the early 1930s. She offers insights on the Civil Rights movement decades after she had completed her education and provides her opinions on the positive impact of desegregation in school systems and the expansion of opportunities for younger generations of African Americans.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 July 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH239
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Sapp, Ruby
Biographical note: Ruby Sapp was born on January 16, 1908. Her parents were Lula and Herbert Carmen. Her father ran a grocery store in Mayfield for over twenty five years. Her mother died when she was one year old. She joined St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church at thirteen years old. She attended Lincoln Elementary School and at age twelve she began high school. Sapp graduated high school in 1924 and that fall attended Tennessee State College in Nashville, where she graduated with a degree in education in 1928. She returned to Mayfield and taught at the Dunbar School for two years before moving to South Carolina. In 1939, she again returned to Mayfield and taught in the public schools for thirty-eight years. She taught home economics, English and science. She retired from teaching in 1970.
Description: Ruby Sapp of Mayfield, Kentucky discusses black schools and segregation during the first half of the 20th century. In 1917, she recalled witnessing a mob of people lynching a man not from her school. After this event, she expressed that fear of the black community. She mentioned traveling to Hot Springs, Arkansas, where she remembered first learning of Jim Crow. Sapp stated that the only job available for black men was in the tobacco barns of local farmers. During the Great Depression, she recalled the family making many sacrifices to support her father. She also described that when public schools began to integrate that rocks were thrown into the school’s windows.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 July 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH122
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Jackson, Hugh
Biographical note: Hugh Jackson was born in Mayfield, Kentucky on March 3, 1919 to Fannie and Haley Jackson. He attended elementary and high school at the Dunbar School, an independent black school. He graduated high school in 1933 and began taking classes in the fall of 1934 at West Kentucky Industrial College. He completed his studies there in 1936 and in 1937 attended Rust College in Holy Springs, Mississippi. Jackson graduated from Rust in 1939 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. In the fall of 1942, he began teaching at Milton Elementary School in Fulton, Kentucky. He remained at Milton for seven years before returning to Mayfield. In 1959, Jackson became the first black candidate to run for City Council in Mayfield.
Description: Hugh Jackson recalls his childhood and early adulthood in Mayfield, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. He describes the African American community of Mayfield and his education in segregated schools. Jackson mentions his first job at a local grocery store and attending St. James African Methodist Church. He vividly recalls his high school days at the Dunbar School. He concluded with a discussion on his career as a teacher and politician
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 July 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH113
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Patterson, Lula May Bell
Biographical note: Lula May Bell Patterson was born in May 1923 in Paducah, Kentucky. She was the only child of Professor H. Bell and Mattie Burrow. Her father died soon after her birth. She graduated from Lincoln High School in 1941 in Paducah and from Kentucky State College in 1948. She began her teaching career in a one-room school that housed the first through eighth grades in Wickliffe, Ballard County, Kentucky. She taught in Kentucky for two years before obtaining a teaching job in Hayti, Missouri. She taught in Hayti for at least twenty-eight years and was the first African American to teach in the integrated school system. She married twice, divorcing her first husband and later marrying her second husband, Robert Patterson, in 1976. She died on November 8, 1982 in Hayti and is buried in Paducah.
Description: Lula Patterson reflects upon her parents, Professor H. Bell and Mattie Burrow, with a focus on her father’s career as an educator. She provided a story of a school bully who made her complete his homework. She discussed discipline practices in schools while she was a youth. She described her chores at home. She recounted an incident at Lincoln High School in Paducah, Kentucky when she attempted to kick her classmate, Clarence Gains. She recalled the physical and financial conditions in her community in Paducah. She mentioned the people who influenced her most in life, including her mother, grandparents and many teachers. She described her years working and attending classes at Kentucky State College in Frankfort, Kentucky during the 1940s. She told of her first teaching job in a one-room school in Ballard County, Kentucky. She remembered the difficulties of many of her students had with learning proper English. Patterson described her 28 years of teaching in Missouri, including her difficulties in being respected as an African American teacher in an integrated school system. She joked about how the girls in high school were concerned that the boys were all away during World War II. She revealed a long term health problem in her throat as a result of her experiences durin and the after the Paducah Flood of 1937. She concluded the interview with biographical information on her son and the organizations that she was active in, including the Order of the Eastern Star and Burkes Chapel AME.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Payton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 July 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH263
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Peoples, Elle Matthews
Biographical note: Elle Matthews Peoples was born on August 13, 1924 in Paducah, Kentucky. She is one of eight children of Leslie Matthews, Sr. and Lettie G. Matthews. She completed first through eighth grade at Union Station School in McCracken County, Kentucky and high school at the Lincoln School in Paducah. She attended Oakwood Junior College in Huntsville, Alabama. She obtained a position as a teacher’s aide at the Headstart program in Paducah. She decided to attend Murray State College to become certified as a teacher.
Description: Elle M. Peoples began the interview with the occupations and locations of her seven siblings and her father. She discussed her grandfather, a slave from West Virginia, who was educated by his master’s son. She described the facilities of her elementary school, Union Station School, in McCracken County, Kentucky and the names of her teachers. She named her teachers and classmates at the segregated Lincoln High School in Paducah. She mentioned attending Oakwood Junior College in Huntsville, Alabama and Murray State College in Murray, Kentucky. She described her father’s eighty-nine acre farm in McCracken County and how her family was able to subsist almost exclusively on the food products from the farm. Peoples also talks about how private telephones did not become common until the 1950s. The family home did not have running water but a cistern that collected rainwater. She discussed the integration of the McCracken County schools from the perspective of a parent and perceived integration as a positive change. She also noted the racial integration of communities and neighborhoods and the decline of agriculture in the Jackson Purchase since the 1960s and 1970s. She recalled various home remedies that her mother used for illnesses and injuries. She concluded the interview with the occupations of her five children and the names of the organizations she was involved in.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary Sled
Date of interview: 1979 July 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH264
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: DeLime, John L. (part 2)
Biographical note: Wade Cunningham was a Baptist preacher from Trigg County, Kentucky. He was born in Trigg County in 1905. He preached a number oJohn L. DeLime was employed by the National Park Service in Kentucky, Florida, Virginia, Louisiana and Tennessee from 1946 until his retirement.
Description: John L. DeLime discusses his job at the Land Between the Lakes Wildlife Refuge. He recalls the Refuge starting in 1937 and offers a brief history. DeLime began employment in 1946. His duties included trapping deer and turkey and relocating them to other parts of Kentucky to rebuild wildlife populations. He mentions other wildlife in the park such as bobcat, beaver, mink and fox. He also explains their activities and habits. DeLime departed the region in 1950.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1979 June 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH043
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: The Land Between the Lakes - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: DeLime, John L. (part 1)
Biographical note: Wade Cunningham was a Baptist preacher from Trigg County, Kentucky. He was born in Trigg County in 1905. He preached a number of years at the Cumberland Baptist Church at Cumberland, Kentucky pJohn L. DeLime was employed by the National Park Service in Kentucky, Florida, Virginia, Louisiana and Tennessee from 1946 until his retirement.
Description: John L. DeLime discusses his job at the Land Between the Lakes Wildlife Refuge. He recalls the Refuge starting in 1937 and offers a brief history. DeLime began employment in 1946. His duties included trapping deer and turkey and relocating them to other parts of Kentucky to rebuild wildlife populations. He mentions other wildlife in the park such as bobcat, beaver, mink and fox. He also explains their activities and habits. DeLime departed the region in 1950.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Herndon, Jerry
Date of interview: 1979 June 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH043
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cruse, James
Biographical note: James Cruse was born on May 30, 1911 in Marion, Kentucky to John and Mary Cruse. He attended elementary school in Marion, Kentucky and worked odd jobs after graduating from eighth grade. Since there was not an African American high school in Marion, he moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky to attend school. He transferred to the West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah, Kentucky during the tenth grade. He later worked in Indianapolis as a machinist and attended a technical school part time to advance his career. He worked at General Motors for seventeen years, starting as a maintenance man and was promoted to machinist during World War II.
Description: James Cruse discusses his early life in Marion, Crittenden County, Kentucky as an elementary school student. He describes attending high school in Bowling Green, Kentucky and at West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah, Kentucky. President D. H. Anderson is mentioned as having a lasting influence on his students, including Mr. Cruse. He speaks of the benefits of attending trade schools. He divulges the employment situation for African Americans in the Jackson Purchase Area and how work opportunities expanded for African Americans during the Second World War. He recalled the return of Klu Klux Klan to the Jackson Purchase in response to the desegregation of public education.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 June 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH244
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Dean, Elmer Joule
Biographical note: Elmer Joule Dean was born on July 21, 1913 in Du Quoin, Perry County, Illinois. He was the only child of Perry and Lena Dean. He attended the all black Lincoln Elementary School in Du Quoin and graduated from the integrated Township High School. He started at West Kentucky Industrial College in February of 1934 on a basketball scholarship. He received a two year provisional certificate upon graduation and he applied for a job in the school system of his hometown of Du Quoin. When he was refused a job, Dean helped to organize a movement to prevent the reelection of the racist superintendent the next school year and was successful. In 1937, he obtained a job as a fifth grade teacher at the Lincoln School in Du Quoin and later became Principal of the school. He worked at the Lincoln School unitl 1943. He served in the United States Army for three years during World War II but was never deployed overseas. Annoyed with the prejudice towards African Americans in the military, he left the army and established a dry cleaning business in Bowling Green, Kentucky. He attended Columbia University in New York for a Masters and Doctoral degree and taught at Georgia Industrial College in Savannah for thirty years and retiring as the Chairman of the Department of Social Sciences.
Description: Elmer Dean discusses segregation in education in Southern Illinois from the perspective of a student and as a teacher. He also discusses his education at West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah, Kentucky during the Great Depression. He further describes President D. H. Anderson’s role in maintaining West Kentucky Industrial College in the face of local opposition. He details experiences with racial discrimination in the work force and discriminatory hiring processes used prior to the 1950s. He mentions instances of discrimination while at a Coca Cola factory, the school system of Du Quoin, Illinois, the United States Army during World War II and when he applied for positions as a university professor. He concludes by offering advice to African Americans on how they can rise above discrimination and prejudice and become successful.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, William
Date of interview: 1979 June 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH246
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Frierson, John Richard
Biographical note: John Richard Frierson was born on September 27, 1909 in Bowling Green, Kentucky. His parents were William and Katie Frierson. He attended a segregated elementary and high school in Bowling Green. He attended Tennessee State College in Nashville for three years. Before he graduated from college, he enlisted in the transportation corps of the United States Army during World War II on April 12, 1944 at Ft. Thomas in Newport, Kentucky. After serving for three years in the military, he moved to Louisville where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the Municipal College of the University of Louisville. He began his Master’s coursework at the University of Indiana and transferred to Murray State Teachers College in Murray, Kentucky where he completed his Master degree. He moved to Paducah to teach science at the segregated Lincoln High School in 1948. He was transferred to Garfield Elementary School as a teacher and principal in 1951. He was the first African American to work in the Board of Education Office in Paducah. Mr. Frierson died on February 8, 1994 at the age of 84.
Description: John R. Frierson begins the interview with biographical information on his parents, William and Katie Frierson. He briefly mentions his elementary school, high school and the beginning of college before serving three years in the transportation corps of the United States Army during World War II. He named the teachers at Garfield Elementary School in Paducah, Kentucky, where he served as the principal during the early 1950s. He recalled the racial friction caused by integration of the public elementary schools in Paducah. He also discussed other changes in education that he experienced as a teacher and administrator in Western Kentucky, including low salaries for African American teachers, the adoption of lunch programs and the adding of special education classrooms, art education, music education and physical education. He states that his favorite teaching experiences were in the one-room schoolhouse where he first began his teaching career. He cited the lack of discipline problems and the ability of children to learn from the other grades’ lessons as his reasons for enjoying the school.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 June 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH249
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Carmon, Evie
Biographical note: Evie Bush Carman was born in 1900 in Panther Creek, Graves County, Kentucky to Richard and Ida Bush. She attended Paducah’s West Kentucky Vocational School, in 1917, but took a break from her education due to the First World War. She taught in Benton, Kentucky for six months before returning to West Kentucky Vocational School. After finishing at West Kentucky, she returned to Graves County to teach. She married Andrew J. Carman on May 2, 1923 and moved to Cleveland, Ohio. They later returned to Kentucky and lived in Louisville, where she received a Bachelor’s degree. After her parents fell ill, she returned to Graves County. At the time of the interview, she worked with the Purchase Area Development District. Her husband, Andrew, passed away in 1983 and Evie died on April 13, 2004.
Description: Evie Bush Carman discusses teaching and living in Benton, Kentucky as an African American in a predominately white community in 1918. She describes her educational background and attending West Kentucky Vocational School in Paducah, Kentucky. She recalls teaching at various segregated schools in Graves County, Kentucky during the early 1920s after graduation. She also briefly mentions significant events in West Kentucky during World War I.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH238
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: England, Artice
Biographical note: Artice England was born in Graves County, Kentucky on October 22, 1904. Her parents James and Anita Mason were farmers. She attended elementary school in a one room schoolhouse in Graves County and entered Lincoln High School in Paducah, Kentucky in 1918. In 1922, she graduated and passed the Kentucky teacher’s examination to receive her teaching certificate. In April 1923, she married George England and moved to Mayfield, Kentucky. She taught at four different one room elementary schools in Graves County. She attended the Normal School of West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah and later Murray State College in Murray, Kentucky. She taught fourth grade at the segregated Dunbar Elementary School in Mayfield, Kentucky for thirty-seven years, with one brief stint as a third grade teacher. She also taught for one year at an integrated school in Mayfield before retiring in 1968. England died in St. Louis, Missouri at the age of 88 on June 4, 1993.
Description: Artice England describes the conditions of a one room schoolhouse in Graves County, Kentucky as an elementary school student. She recalls attending the all-black Lincoln High School in Paducah, Kentucky from 1918 to 1922. She discusses the role faculty members played on shaping the education of female students at West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah. She details her experiences as a teacher in African American schools in Graves County, including four one room schoolhouses and teaching thirty-seven years at Dunbar Elementary School. She expresses the benefits of racial integration in schools as providing higher quality resources and facilities for black students. She mentions Mayfield teachers in assisting refugees from Paducah during the Flood of 1937.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, William
Date of interview: 1979 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH247
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Jackson, Verna Wade
Biographical note: Verna Wade Jackson was born on June 18, 1914 in Mayfield, Graves County, Kentucky. She was an only child and her parents died before she was five years old. She and a cousin were raised by her widowed maternal grandmother. She attended the all-African American Dunbar School in Mayfield, which contained grades first through the twelfth. She started taking piano lessons at ten years old, which her grandmother paid for by doing the washing for the piano teacher. After one year of lessons, she played for the morning service of her church, St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church in Mayfield. She graduated from Dunbar High School in 1933 and attended West Kentucky Industrial College from 1933 to 1935. She obtained a position as pianist for the College for two years to cover her education expenses. After West Kentucky, she taught for thirty-seven years in Milton Elementary School, Fulton County, Kentucky. In 1943, she married Principal Hugh C. Jackson. Jackson passed away on December 9, 2009 at the age of 95.
Description: Verna Wade Jackson began the interview with her parent’s background and how she was raised by her grandmother in Mayfield, Kentucky. She goes on to discuss her memories of Dunbar School in Mayfield, including the physical conditions of the building, some of her favorite teachers and her interest in music at the school. She recounts some of the professors at West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah, Kentucky and how she was able to afford the expenses by serving as the college’s pianist. She describes some of the buildings present during the 1930s when she attend West Kentucky Industrial College, including the administration building, auditorium, two dormitories, gymnasium, and a house in which the students practice teaching. She relates her first teaching job out of college at Milton Elementary School in Fulton County, Kentucky, where she stayed for thirty-seven years until she retired. She acknowledges the inequalities in the education of African Americans in Mayfield and Fulton County while she was a teacher, citing the differences in curriculum and books as one example. She recounts how residents of the city of Mayfield and Fulton County offered shelter to refugees from Paducah during the Flood of 1937, both in terms of owners opening their private homes and using schools to house the refugees. Lastly, she discusses her original life aspiration to become a concert pianist and the realization in college that it was not a field that she could enter easily, especially as an African American.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH253
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Williamson, Norvel J.
Biographical note: Norvel J. Williamson’s parents were Cullie and Louie Williamson. He attended segregated public schools, including Lincoln High School where he graduated in June of 1937. He attended and graduated college at Kentucky State University. After graduation, he worked in dining services for the Illinois Central Railroad for thirty two years. He was an active member of the labor union and joined soon after it organized.
Description: Norvel J. Williamson talks about his early life in Paducah, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He recalls the Great Depression, the flood of 1937 and his early years in school. He mentions that many were financially wiped out after the flood of 1937. During the flood, Williamson carried sandbags to the levy at Hickman. During the Great Depression, his father worked for Illinois Central Railroad and later for the Work Progress Administration. He reflects on working for the railroad and the growth of labor unions. He describes Noble Park and Stewart Nelson Park and white black relationships in the city prior to the civil rights movement. He mentioned that blacks had access to the public libraries and were able to attend white churches.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 November 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH126
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Copeland, Cletus
Biographical note: Cletus Copeland was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on July 29, 1903. His parents moved to Marshall County, Kentucky just prior to his first birthday. His father was a farmer that grew tobacco and corn and raised livestock. He attended the Darnell School and was a member of the Uson Baptist Church. He worked in road construction for Marshall County, managed a general store at Benton and sold feed and mulch.
Description: Cletus Copeland discusses his life in Western Kentucky during the early half of the 20th century. He describes attending school and church, working on the family farm and attending social and community activities during his childhood. He recalls attending church, the effects of the Great Depression and the increase of food and land prices during the Second World War. Copeland states that most African Americans in the area that could not find employment moved to places like Detroit, Michigan with hopes to find work. He also mentions the various jobs that he held, including farming, running a general store and road construction.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 November 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH101
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ray, Corine E.
Biographical note: Corine Ray was lifelong resident of Murray, Kentucky. Her father was George Richardson. She married James Ray on August 26, 1927. She was a member of the Washington Street Church, where she sang in the choir, served as secretary for twenty-five years and founded the “Sunshine Band”.
Description: Corine Ray describes life in Murray, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. She discusses family life, church involvement and her marriage. She describes how her family survived during the Great Depression and how her husband searched to find work. She recalled that he made 50 cents one day and returned with a steak, potatoes, buttermilk, flour and one onion. She also recalled receiving milk tickets for her first child. Ray remembered that coal was scarce and people would wait by the train tracks for fallen coal from passing freight trains.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH121
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Whittemore, Ananias
Biographical note: Ananias Whittemore was born near Boaz, Graves County, Kentucky to Doug and Tina Whittemore. His father was a minister at Shelton Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church and a farmer. He attended elementary school at Shelton Chapel until the eighth grade when he began working in the clay pit. At the time of the interview he had preached at two different churches for close to fifty years.
Description: Ananias Whittemore discusses his childhood while growing up in a African American household in rural Graves County, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He describes the segregated school he attended as a child, daily activities and working in the clay pit alongside his father. He explains the process of growing sugar cane and made making molasses. He began skimming and making molasses with his father at the age of five. He remembers selling molasses for twenty-five cents per gallon. After school, he began working in the clay pits at age fourteen where he worked ten hours a day making 18 cents an hour. He also worked at the local sawmill for a brief time. Whittemore also discusses the two churches that he served as a preacher for and his work in the ministry.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Marable, Addie C.
Date of interview: 1979 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH125
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Maxwell, Opal
Biographical note: Opal Maxwell was a lifelong resident of Paducah, Kentucky. Her father operated a farm and grew tobacco. She married at age nineteen without her parents consent. Her husband was a sharecropper that farmed and raised cows.
Description: Opal Maxwell discusses her childhood in Paducah, Kentucky. She describes the process of growing tobacco, working the fields and daily chores. She explains the process of smoking sausage, making applesauce and other country dishes. She also recalls attending church and school in the same building, that being the England School.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH117
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ligon, Gladyes S.
Biographical note: Gladyes S. Ligon was born in Graves County, Kentucky in 1901. His parents, King and Jesse Ligon, owned a farm that grew corn, tobacco and raised cows, horses, hogs and chickens. He attended Shelton Elementary School near Bardwell until the sixth grade. He helped to build three churches in Graves County and one in Hickman County. In 1918, he traveled to Gary, Indiana and worked at a tin mill. He returned to Graves County where he and his brother, Griffon, bought a sixty-five acre farm. He married Yewella Jenkins in 1926 and they had seven children. His wife was a teacher at Neal’s Chapel Church.
Description: Gladyes S. Ligon discusses his childhood on a farm in rural Graves County, Kentucky. He recalls attending school and that classes were scheduled around the planting and harvest months. He describes life during the Great Depression and how it affected his family and community. After his father’s death, Ligon returned home and to work on the farm. Ligon mentions attending church as a child and that there was no fire department in Mayfield, Kentucky during in his youth.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH115
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hopkins, Bill
Biographical note: Bill Hopkins was born in Oakland, Mississippi. His family relocated from Mississippi to Arkansas when he was 11 years old. In 1923, his family moved to Memphis, Tennessee. In 1941, Hopkins moved to Paducah and worked as a chef at the Irvin Cobb Hotel. The following year, he joined the United States Army and traveled to multiple islands in the Pacific during the Second World War. After the war, he joined the Washington Street Baptist Church where he served on the finance committee and later was a deacon.
Description: Bill Hopkins discusses his experiences as an African American in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee and Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He describes his travels as a child from Mississippi, to Arkansas, to Tennessee and lastly to Paducah. He recalls his parents and their occupations, where he attended school and that he never witnessed any racial tensions during his early life. He mentions the training he received as a chef, his recollections of the prohibition era, the Great Depression and his military service in the Second World War.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Marable, Addie C.
Date of interview: 1979 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH128
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his political career in the Kentucky State Legislature in the early 1960s. The interview begins with a biographical description of Barton’s life up to his time in the state legislature. He recounts his decision to enter politics and campaigning for office. He recalls the gubernatorial terms of Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs, and Edward T. Breathitt and offers opinions upon their service to the state. He mentions constitutional amendments argued in the legislature and gives his opinions on future amendments to state constitution.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Gaines, Olivia B.
Biographical note: Olivia Gaines was born August 19, 1905 in Paducah, Kentucky. Her father, Lawrence T. Bolen, worked at the railroad shop until he died when she was nine years old. She began working at a young age due to her father’s death. She attended Lincoln Elementary School and graduated high school in 1922. She owned a catering business for twenty eight years. Her brother, Manuel, managed an ice cream business. His store was the first and only business in downtown Paducah that was owned by an African American in the 1910s and 1920s. She also states that her brother was the owner of the first taxi business in Paducah, a prominent restaurateur and owned a business that sold mirrors.
Description: Olivia Gaines describes her life as an African American woman in Paducah, Kentucky. She discusses her childhood in a very religious household and how her mother was responsible for construction of the first restrooms at Burks’ Chapel in Paducah. She describes her neighborhood as a mixture of black and white families and that there were never any racial problems. She mentions the business and civic activities of her brother Manuel Bolen. She describes his involvement with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Joe Hale murder case. She also mentions that her brother and the N.A.A.C.P. worked on removing segregation signs at local business and public buildings.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Marable, Addie
Date of interview: 1979 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH106
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses how the various New Deal Projects of the 1930s impacted Graves County, Kentucky. He describes voter turnout for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 and the introduction of the Civilian Works Administration (CWA), which was later replaced by the Public Works Administration (PWA). He details the construction of the Mayfield High School Annex, the Dublin School and the Graves County Courthouse Annex as government sponsored New Deal projects. He concludes the interview with a discussion on the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and their efforts to record burial locations of veterans, the writer’s projects, improvement of public roads and community recreational activities in Graves County.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1979 November 15, 1993 March 29, 1993 April 9 and 1993 April 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses how the various New Deal Projects of the 1930s impacted Graves County, Kentucky. He describes voter turnout for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 and the introduction of the Civilian Works Administration (CWA), which was later replaced by the Public Works Administration (PWA). He details the construction of the Mayfield High School Annex, the Dublin School and the Graves County Courthouse Annex as government sponsored New Deal projects. He concludes the interview with a discussion on the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and their efforts to record burial locations of veterans, the writer’s projects, improvement of public roads and community recreational activities in Graves County.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1979 November 15, 1993 March 29, 1993 April 9 and 1993 April 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barnes, Stanford
Biographical note: Barnes was born on May 19, 1924 in Virginia. He received his elementary through secondary education in Virginia before moving to Kentucky in 1962. He served in the United States Army during World War II and Korean War. As a high school teacher in Paducah, Kentucky, he was very active in the school’s chapter of the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA). He died on July 18, 1998 and is buried in Paducah.
Description: Barnes discusses the influential high school club, Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA), which he was active in as a teacher in Kentucky. He faced discrimination as an African American advisor for the club that eventually led him to resign from the position. He was concerned that his students would have limited opportunities due to the VICA supervisors’ prejudice against him.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Jordan, Thelma
Date of interview: 1979 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH233
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Porter, Marion Arundeil
Biographical note: Marion Porter was born on February 10, 1916. His father, James E. Porter, was a concrete contractor in Paducah. His mother ran a salon from the family home. He attended the Lincoln School from elementary to high school. He quit school after the eleventh grade to work with his father. From 1935 to 1939, he hauled coal for the West Kentucky Coal Company. Porter was drafted into the United States Navy in 1943. He traveled from Paducah to Maryland for basic training and then to California. His job was to assist in clearing underwater mines planted by the Japanese. He returned from the service in 1946.
Description: Marion Porter discusses his life experiences as an African American growing up in Paducah, Kentucky. He describes the reason why his family moved to Paducah and that during the flood of 1938 his family remained in their house and took in thirty-three homeless neighbors. During the prohibition era, he remembered bootleggers selling whiskey by the pint or by the glass. The bootleggers would hide their liquor in the fireplace or in the walls. He mentioned that his father assisted in putting down the first concrete sidewalk in Paducah and that he was the first black contractor in the city. He tells of his involvement in church, including being a member of the choir, a trustee and starting the brotherhood organization. He recalled mixing concrete by hand, and making $2.40 a week for installing basements for houses. He concludes the interview by describing his military service in the United States Navy during the Second World War.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 November 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH120
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Beasley, Charlie
Biographical note: Charlie Beasley was born in Ballard County, Kentucky on August 7, 1906. His mother and father were both farmers. Charlie had five brothers and two sisters. Charlie attended Bethel/Barlow church for his education. During his adolescence, Charlie cut tobacco. In 1922, Charlie moved to St. Louis to work for a contractor that constructed railroad switches. He then relocated to Mayfield to work for the company of Bradley and Wilson that assisted in the construction of Highway 60. In 1952, he moved to Paducah where he helped construct local shops downtown. Charlie moved to Murray, Kentucky in 1955. He retired in 1971.
Description: Charlie Beasley was a native of Ballard County, Kentucky. He discusses his early childhood years and the employment opportunities he had during his life. He describes African American communities in Paducah, Mayfield and Murray, Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1950s. He mentions the 8th of August celebration or “Colored Folk’s Day” at Paducah and also describes his encounters with racism by employers and community members.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Jordan, Thelma
Date of interview: 1979 November 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH095
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Curd, Alice J.
Biographical note: Alice J. Curd was born in Paducah, Kentucky. She resided in the African American community on Washington Street. She was member of the Washington Street Church and attended Garfield Elementary School and Lincoln High School. During the flood of 1937, she was evacuated and lived with relatives in Mayfield, Kentucky. She married in 1938 and moved to Almo, Kentucky. She and her husband moved to Murray, Kentucky in 1940. While in Murray she attended St. John Baptist Church, where she sang in the choir and was on the entertainment committee. When her husband passed in 1959, Curd moved back to Paducah.
Description: Alice Jordan Curd discusses attending segregated schools and African American churches in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She mentions the Reverend J. W. Hawkins of the Washington Street congregation, recalls the flood of 1937 and the effects of the Great Depression.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 November 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH102
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Sledd, Mary Glenn
Biographical note: Mary Glenn Sledd was a lifelong resident of Paducah, Kentucky. Her childhood was spent in an African American neighborhood in the city. She attended Lincoln Elementary, and graduated from Lincoln High School in 1933. Afterwards she attended Western Kentucky Industrial College. She worked for the Registrar’s Office at Paducah Community College from 1964 to 1976. She later became Chairperson of the Business Department at the college. She also served as clerk of the Washington Street Baptist Church and secretary of the Sunday school. She was a friend of Osceola Dawson whom Sledd considered the “backbone” of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in Paducah.
Description: Mary Glenn Sledd discusses her experiences living in Paducah, Kentucky in an African American community during the 1920s and 1930s. She describes public schools and the educators that taught during segregation. She gives a history of the Washington Street Baptist Church and mentions significant community members. She discusses her feelings about Paducah as a community and the advancements the city has made in racial equality. She also reflects on how Osceola Dawson was a great inspiration to her and her career.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 November 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH131
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Peyton, William Carl
Biographical note: William Carl Peyton was born in Murray, Kentucky on December 10, 1910. His parents were Luther William; an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad Company and Loyala Pearl Ford, a retired school teacher. Peyton attended Dunbar Elementary School in Murray until the third grade. His family moved to Paducah where he attended Lincoln High School. After high school, he attended Western Kentucky Industrial College and later Kentucky State University. At Kentucky State, he was head cheerleader and was in the drama and dance clubs. He also participated in the school chorus and was a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. After school, he moved back to Paducah where he was substitute teacher for the black city schools. He received his first teaching position at West Paducah High School in 1934, and continued to live in Paducah until 1953. He then moved to Pontiac, Michigan and worked in the Recreational Department. In 1958, he moved to Chicago, Illinois to teacher. He retired and returned to Paducah in 1976.
Description: William Carl Peyton discusses his childhood and early adulthood as an African American living in Paducah, Kentucky. He recalls attending the Washington Street Baptist Church and Brooks Chapel. He describes his teaching career and involvement in the city public school system. He describes segregation in Paducah during the 1930s and 1940s and that blacks were directed to sit in the balcony of the movie theatre and had to enter via the loading dock at most restaurants. He also recalls the local bus terminal having different waiting rooms for both whites and blacks. He spoke of the Great Depression and how it affected his plans for higher education. He mentions his involvement with the Black Oral History Program, which began June 1st 1979 and his later involvement in the N.A.A.C.P. He reflects upon the Emancipation Project Celebration also know as the 8th of August Celebration, in which he organized committees in the black community to develop programs and events for nation’s bicentennial.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 November 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH119
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bates, Mary F.
Biographical note: Mary Bates was born at Paducah, Kentucky on August 16, 1920. Her mother was a domestic worker. Her father worked for railroad shops until he became a church minister. She was a member of the Washington Street Baptist Church for over 50 years. She taught Sunday school, managed sponsored programs and served as the church historian. She received her undergraduate at Lincoln University and acquired a Masters degree at the University of Cincinnati. She taught at public schools in the City of Paducah for 42 years. Bates served as the president of the Women’s Missionary Union, was the Vice President of Church Women United and was a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.
Description: Mary Bates discusses her experiences as a teacher in Paducah, Kentucky from the 1940s to the 1980s. She details her family history, early childhood, and involvement in the community and church organizations. She also reminisces about the Great Depression and the civil rights movement in Paducah during the 1960s.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Marable, A. C.
Date of interview: 1979 November 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH094
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Curd, James B.
Biographical note: James B. Curd was a native of Calloway County, Kentucky. His father farmed corn, tobacco, hay, and raised livestock on an eighty acre farm. He began his education at age five at the Howard School but soon transferred to the Hickory Grove School. He graduated from Lynn Grove High School. He regularly attended Martin’s Chapel, a Methodist Church near Murray, Kentucky. He married in 1908. Curd farmed until 1928 when a crop failure forced him to sell his farm. He worked for Jones Dairy Farm during the late 1920s, which later became part of Murray State University. He moved to the city of Murray in 1930. His great-grandfather was an early pioneer and land speculator in the Jackson Purchase area.
Description: James B. Curd describes his life in Calloway County, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th Century. He discusses his childhood and attending rural one room schools, the impact of the First World War to the region and the community’s growth in the 1920s. He also reflects upon the economic troubles of the 1930s, President Roosevelt’s “New Deal” to provide relief for the region and the community’s struggles during Second World War.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 November 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH103
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Logan, Flora
Biographical note: Flora Odessa Freeman Logan was born on June 20, 1910 in Paducah, Kentucky to Mumford Thomas and Ruth Ann N. Freeman. In November 1918, Mrs. Logan’s family moved to DeRittier, Louisiana to operate a hotel for the African American men who worked in a lumber business. Her father became ill with malaria, which led the family to move back to Paducah in 1919. Her father died later than same year when Mrs. Logan was nine years old. She and her mother moved to St. Louis in 1924. Mrs. Logan died in St. Louis on December 6, 1998.
Description: Flora Logan details the life of her father, Mumford Thomas Freeman (1853-1919) of Cottage Grove, Tennessee. She describes her father’s parents and the occupations of his siblings. She continued to describe her father’s occupation as a farmer and carpenter in Sharon, Tennessee and his marriage to her mother, Ruth Ann, in 1888. She describes his instrumental role in having established grade school for African American children in the town of Sharon, amidst white opposition. While originally a well-respected man of the community, Mrs. Logan described how a rift between the white population and Mr. Freeman was forged when it was made aware that the teacher of the African American school, Ms. Clark, was teaching Mr. Freeman’s. She recounts how her father was essentially forced to sell his property to a white family and her family’s relocation to Mound City, Illinois. She chronicles the events that led her family to move to Paducah, Kentucky. She discusses the occupations of her older brothers who had moved, including one brother who served overseas with the United States Army in France during World War I. She describes her family’s five-month period in Louisiana, where they faced intense racial prejudice in the Deep South. Her father contracted malaria and the family to move back to Paducah where he died in 1919. She details the financial difficulties her mother had in trying to pay for his funeral and the family’s eventual move to St. Louis, Missouri. She ends the interview by describing her father’s personality as she remembers him and based on stories from others.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Logan, Flora (self interview)
Date of interview: 1979 October 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH256
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cox, Noble
Biographical note: Noble Cox was born December 4, 1896 in Kirksey, Kentucky. He grew up on the family farm southwest of Kirksey. He moved to Wingo, Kentucky where he attended high school. He later moved to Detroit, Michigan for a brief time to seek employment.
Description: Noble Cox enlisted in the United States Navy at age 21. He was sent to Newport, Rhode Island for his basic training where he remained throughout the First World War. Cox studied to be a naval nurse and worked in the main hospital during the flu epidemic of 1918 and 1919. He was in the United States Navy from April 6, 1918 to November 20, 1919.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 October 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH005
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Carmon, Andrew
Biographical note: Andrew Carmon was born on March 20, 1895 and was lifelong resident of Mayfield, Kentucky. He was drafted while living in Louisville, Kentucky and went to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He traveled by ship from Newport News, Virginia to Breast, France where he was a member of the 801st Infantry Regiment until he was reassigned to the 369th Infantry Regiment of the 93rd division which was one of only three African American regiments to witness combat in the First World War. In France, he was reassigned to a French division that allowed African Americans in combat. He was in Alsace Lorraine when the armistice was announced via leaflets dropped from planes.
Description: Andrew Carmon discusses his family background, basic training and transport ships being attacked by German submarines en route to France. He spoke of being one of the few black men in combat and how the different races related to one another. He also discussed what it was like in the trenches in France and being on the front line. He was wounded in France, recovered and ordered go back to the front.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 October 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH004
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Stevens, Effie
Biographical note: Effie Stevens was born at Paducah, Kentucky in 1904. Stevens’ father, Frank Brundy, was a pool cleaner and her mother a housekeeper. Her mother died when she was three years old. After her mother’s death, she resided with her aunt and uncle. After high school, she attended West Kentucky Industrial College. She joined the Harrison Street Church and was baptized in 1914. In 1937, she joined her husband’s church at Ebenezer Baptist Church where they later became missionary workers for the church. Her husband was the church’s deacon.
Description: Effie Stevens discusses her life in Paducah, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. Stevens describes her childhood, attending school and popular social activities and events in the Jackson Purchase. She recalls walking to school on dirt roads that were created from wagons and buggies drawn by horses. She describes natural remedies used by her family to cure certain illnesses, details household chores done as a child and the importance of religion in the community. She mentioned that there were no hospitals or nursing homes in Paducah when she was young. Stevens remembers the 8th of August celebrations, square dancing and local artists playing guitar and banjo. She recalled that her parent’s home had no indoor plumbing, no electricity and no furnaces for cooking and heating. They had a wooden outhouse and used soaked corn husks as toilet paper to save on money. Her family also hung gypsum weed up to get rid of mosquitoes, due to a lack of window screens.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 October 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH123
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Waldrop, H. T. (Part 1)
Biographical note: H. T. Waldrop was a resident of Murray, Kentucky. He served in the United States Navy for two years during the war but never saw overseas duty. He served at Newport, Rhode Island.
Description: H. T. Waldrop discusses his duties in the United States Navy during World War I. He served for two years and was in charge of managing a naval recreation center at Covington Point in Newport, Rhode Island. When he returned from the war he held many jobs including postmaster and oil well driller.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Wigginton, Melinda A. and Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 October 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH026
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Humphrey, Clara H. (part 1)
Biographical note: Clara H. Humphrey was the only child of Delaine and H. T. Waldrop of Coldwater, Kentucky. Her father managed the ice company at Murray, Kentucky. Her mother worked for the local welfare office and kept the accounting records for the ice company. When in the third grade, her parent’s house was destroyed by fire and her family resided in a local hotel for an entire year until the house was rebuilt. In 1939, she graduated Murray High School at the age sixteen. She attended the University of Missouri and graduated with a degree in journalism in 1943. After college, she worked for the Louisville Courier Journal for three years at the news desk. She later worked for the advertising firm of Foreston and Huff and served as news director of WNBS radio in Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Clara H. Humphrey describes her life in Calloway County, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. She begins by discussing that her mother’s father was a county judge and that her mother’s grandfather assisted in writing the 1891 Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. She recalls her father discussing politics with Frank Albert Stubblefield and her family dining regularly with Alben Barkley. She describes having a pet fox and swimming in the community pool near the Murray Ice Company where her parents were employed. As a child, she recalled attending events at Pogue Library, singing Christmas carols at Lowry Auditorium and participating in other events on the Murray State University campus. She describes the effects of the Great Depression on her family and the closure of the First National Bank of Murray. While working for the Louisville Courier Journal, Humphrey recalled a report of a man being lynched. She concludes with a discussion on her time as a news director of WNBS in Murray.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1979 October 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH111
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Humphrey, Clara H. (part 2)
Biographical note: Clara H. Humphrey was the only child of Delaine and H. T. Waldrop of Coldwater, Kentucky. Her father managed the ice company at Murray, Kentucky. Her mother worked for the local welfare office and kept the accounting records for the ice company. When in the third grade, her parent’s house was destroyed by fire and her family resided in a local hotel for an entire year until the house was rebuilt. In 1939, she graduated Murray High School at the age sixteen. She attended the University of Missouri and graduated with a degree in journalism in 1943. After college, she worked for the Louisville Courier Journal for three years at the news desk. She later worked for the advertising firm of Foreston and Huff and served as news director of WNBS radio in Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Clara H. Humphrey describes her life in Calloway County, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. She begins by discussing that her mother’s father was a county judge and that her mother’s grandfather assisted in writing the 1891 Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. She recalls her father discussing politics with Frank Albert Stubblefield and her family dining regularly with Alben Barkley. She describes having a pet fox and swimming in the community pool near the Murray Ice Company where her parents were employed. As a child, she recalled attending events at Pogue Library, singing Christmas carols at Lowry Auditorium and participating in other events on the Murray State University campus. She describes the effects of the Great Depression on her family and the closure of the First National Bank of Murray. While working for the Louisville Courier Journal, Humphrey recalled a report of a man being lynched. She concludes with a discussion on her time as a news director of WNBS in Murray.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1979 October 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH111
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Harriford, Robert
Biographical note: Robert L. Harriford was born in Nobob, Barren County, Kentucky on June 28, 1927. His parents, Willie and Grace Harriford, were tenant farmers in Metcalfe County, Kentucky during his elementary school years. He moved to Paducah and enrolled in West Kentucky Vocational School on April 5, 1949. He was the owner and operator of Harriford Reproductions, a printing business, in Paducah. On November 19, 1969, he was appointed to the Paducah Board of Education, serving as the Board’s first African American. He was appointed to the Kentucky School Board Association Executive Board of Directors after serving on the Paducah Board of Education for two years. He died on July 1, 2009 at the age of 82.
Description: Robert Harriford begins the interview with background information on his parents, siblings and early childhood. He mentioned how his family coped during the Great Depression by surviving off food they grew as farmers. He discussed his time at West Kentucky Vocational School in Paducah, Kentucky during the late 1940s and early 1950s and how the training he received in automobile mechanics was useful in his future printing business. He also spoke about how he worked his way through West Kentucky Vocational School as a farmer for a Paducah couple and how their connections enabled him to get a job at Magnavox. He recounted the process of how he entered into the printing business, first by joining an architectural firm and co-starting a business with a man that he met through the firm and ultimately buying out his co-owner to establish his own business, Harriford Reproductions of Paducah. He discussed the state of African American businesses in Paducah, stating that the number of African American owned businesses were declining. He feels it is important for African Americans to continue to strive to be involved with local Board of Educations to help shape education. He mentions his experiences as an administrator during the state wide teacher strikes in Kentucky. He details his views on a variety of controversial issues and changes in education, including the integration of middle schools in Paducah, quota or percentage systems for hiring teachers of various races, raising the pay scale for African Americans in Paducah, and differential grading and testing for minorities. He finished the interview by acknowledging the people in his life who influenced his success.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 October 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH252
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hudspeth, Florence (part 2)
Biographical note: Florence Hudspeth was born in Murray, Kentucky on May 30, 1935. Her father worked for the Calloway County Lumber Company and also raised hogs and chickens. As a teenager, she washed dishes, chopped wood and caught, killed and de-feathered chickens. She dropped out of school after the eighth grade to find work to assist her family. In 1954, she married a man in the armed services. After he retired from the military, he worked for the local lumber company.
Description: Florence Hudspeth describes the African American experience in Murray, Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s. She mentions an open lot were ‘gypsies’ camped and where they would swap and sell horses and buggies. Her family home did not have electricity but used oil lamps for lighting. As a teenager she went to black owned cafes and visited only black friends. She did not having any white friends as a youth. She recalls there being three black owned restaurants, a blacksmith and a funeral home in Murray during the 1940s and 1950s. She stated that the black community was provided care in the emergency room at the city hospital, but most avoided the hospital unless it was absolutely necessary. During the Second World War, she remembered tanks and army trucks moving through town, as well as food rationing. People stood in line for an entire day just to purchase sugar. She also recalled Western Union delivering telegrams from servicemen and the reactions of those who lost a son during the war.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1979 October 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH110
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hudspeth, Florence (part 1)
Biographical note: Florence Hudspeth was born in Murray, Kentucky on May 30, 1935. Her father worked for the Calloway County Lumber Company and also raised hogs and chickens. As a teenager, she washed dishes, chopped wood and caught, killed and de-feathered chickens. She dropped out of school after the eighth grade to find work to assist her family. In 1954, she married a man in the armed services. After he retired from the military, he worked for the local lumber company.
Description: Florence Hudspeth describes the African American experience in Murray, Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s. She mentions an open lot were ‘gypsies’ camped and where they would swap and sell horses and buggies. Her family home did not have electricity but used oil lamps for lighting. As a teenager she went to black owned cafes and visited only black friends. She did not having any white friends as a youth. She recalls there being three black owned restaurants, a blacksmith and a funeral home in Murray during the 1940s and 1950s. She stated that the black community was provided care in the emergency room at the city hospital, but most avoided the hospital unless it was absolutely necessary. During the Second World War, she remembered tanks and army trucks moving through town, as well as food rationing. People stood in line for an entire day just to purchase sugar. She also recalled Western Union delivering telegrams from servicemen and the reactions of those who lost a son during the war.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1979 October 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH110
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Chappell, Angienella
Biographical note: Angienella Chappell spent her early childhood and teenage years in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1910s and 1920s. Her parents, Clarence and Dolly, owned a restaurant downtown. She attended Garfield Elementary School and Lincoln High School, both all black schools. She graduated high school in 1926 and later attended summer classes at West Kentucky Vocational School. She relocated to Chicago to live and attend college. She worked several jobs in Chicago, which included working for the Social Security Board as a secretary. After retiring she provided testing for the Armed Forces.
Description: Angienella Chappell discusses the difficulties that African Americans faced in west Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. She describes being released early from school due to a lynching, the economic effects of the Great Depression on the black community, a saloon in downtown Paducah during prohibition, the flood of 1913 and the big snow of 1918 which closed the schools from Thanksgiving to early January. She stated how African American women had only two choices after graduating high school, become either a cook or maid or leave town. She did not recall segregated street cars in Paducah as others had testified to witnessing. Chappell concludes with her observations of urban decay in the later part of the 20th century, particularly on 9th and 10th streets which deteriorated into a ghetto.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 October 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH098
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Miller, Buster
Biographical note: Buster Miller was born in Milliton, Tennessee. He was drafted into the United States Army and was assigned to Company D of the 35th Engineer Service. He was first sent to [Camp Doniphan] then to New York. He sailed on a transport in a large convoy to Brest, France. Miller returned home on the H.M.C.S. St. Claire and discharged at Camp Shelby in Mississippi.
Description: Buster Miller discusses his activities before, during and after the First World War. Before the war, he worked for his father in the cotton industry. He describes his training and assignments, the military bases he trained at and being transported overseas to Brest, France. He reflects upon the treatment of black soldiers and his recollections of a typical day in the armed services. He also recalls the time he spent in Germany. After the war, he returned home on the H.M.C.S. St. Claire. He mentioned how he was treated following his returned home, his employment prospects and family life. In closing, he discusses his church affiliation and his pension from the United States government.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH023
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cox, Bettie Coulter
Biographical note: Bettie Coulter Cox was born in 1908 in Paducah, Kentucky. She attended first through twelfth grade at the Lincoln School in Paducah. After graduation, she attended West Kentucky Industrial College where she obtained her teaching training certificate. She received a Bachelor’s degree at Kentucky State University and a Master’s Degree at University of Michigan. She completed summer school work at Lane Cottage, in Jackson, Tennessee and the University of Cincinnati and later correspondence courses from Kansas State College. She taught for a total of fourteen years, from 1927 to 1941, at the Mayfield Model School, Dunbar City School in Mayfield and Lincoln School. She taught at the Lincoln Junior High School from 1941 to 1964 and at Lincoln Senior High in 1964 and 1965. From 1965 to 1973, she taught English at the desegregated Paducah Tilghman High School in Paducah, from which she retired. She died at the age of 92 on September 1, 1998 in Paducah.
Description: Bettie Coulter Cox of Paducah, Kentucky offers biographical information on family members, describes the 1913 and 1937 floods and her teaching in segregated schools. Cox recalls her childhood education at the Lincoln School in Paducah, attending West Kentucky Industrial College and many other academic institutions. She recounts her first teaching job at Mayfield Model School in Graves County, Kentucky and sub sequential teaching positions at Dunbar City School of Mayfield, Lincoln Elementary School, Lincoln Junior High School, Lincoln Senior High School and Paducah Tilghman High School. Other topics that she discusses are the establishment of the National Junior Honor Society at Lincoln Junior High School and the first Negro Girl Scout Troop in Paducah.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 September 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH242
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ginges, Hugh
Biographical note: Hugh Gingles was a farmer from Kirksey, Kentucky. He was drafted and sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky for basic training. He served in the Depot Brigade at Camp Taylor for the duration of the First World War. Following the war, he was sent to Camp Pike near Little Rock, Arkansas.
Description: Hugh Gingles discusses his experiences during the World War I. Prior to the war he was a farmer at Kirksey, Kentucky. He recalls how he was among the first to be drafted and how he decided it to be a just war. Other topics discussed in the interview include: the recruitment of several Jackson Purchase residents on the way to Camp Taylor in Louisville, the insufficiency and deficiencies of the new camps, being in the Depot Brigade, serving as a non-commission officer and attending training school, the different types of people in his company; the feelings of other people towards the war; the flu epidemic; the first big snow during the war and how things had changed when he returned from the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 September 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH011
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Dunlap, L. Monroe
Biographical note: L. Monroe Dunlap was born in Paducah, Kentucky. He attended Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio prior to the start of the First World War. He taught in Metropolis, Illinois and was an elementary school principal in Brookport, Illinois.
Description: L. Monroe Dunlap, an African American World War I veteran, discusses his his family life, early education, job experiences and college education. The majority of the interview focuses on the college he attended and the military training he received at the camp located on campus. He also discussed the different schools he taught at and the changes in the Paducah School System.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH009
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Caldwell, Frank (Part 2)
Biographical note: Frank Caldwell was born in 1896 in McCracken County, Kentucky. His father, Chris Caldwell, was a share cropper in Ballard County, Kentucky. He was drafted into the service on July 29, 1919. He went to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was one of the first in the 801 Division. He went from Camp Taylor to New Jersey then on to New York. He later boarded a ship that landed in Brest, France.
Description: Frank Caldwell discusses his experiences during the First World War. He describes basic training camps, the condition of France and the French people during the war and the outbreak of spinal meningitis. Caldwell mentions the feelings toward Americans at home and his feelings after the war. He also describes the flood of Paducah, Kentucky in 1937.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH003
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Caldwell, Frank (Part 1)
Biographical note: Frank Caldwell was born in 1896 in McCracken County, Kentucky. His father, Chris Caldwell, was a share cropper in Ballard County, Kentucky. He was drafted into the service on July 29, 1919. He went to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was one of the first in the 801 Division. He went from Camp Taylor to New Jersey then on to New York. He later boarded a ship that landed in Brest, France.
Description: Frank Caldwell discusses his experiences during the First World War. He describes basic training camps, the condition of France and the French people during the war and the outbreak of spinal meningitis. Caldwell mentions the feelings toward Americans at home and his feelings after the war. He also describes the flood of Paducah, Kentucky in 1937.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH003
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Wilson, Dow
Biographical note: Dow Wilson was born in McCracken County on April 4, 1893. He was the son of H. R. and Lou Wilson. His father was a farmer and sharecropper. As a child he attended Cecil Elementary School near High Point, Kentucky. He farmed and sharecropped until the age of thirty when he was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad Company. He was a member of the Washington Street Missionary Baptist Church of Paducah. Wilson later served as a deacon at the church.
Description: Dow Wilson describes his experiences as an African American during the first half of the 20th century in rural McCracken County, Kentucky. He mentions attending segregated schools and churches, sharecropping and working for the Illinois Central Railroad Company. He discusses the effects of the Great Depression and Second World War on the black community and the development of the Tennessee Valley Authority in western Kentucky. Wilson also describes the 1942 fire that destroyed the Washington Street Missionary Baptist Church in Paducah and the religious services that were briefly held at Lincoln High School.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH127
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Crouch, Fleetwood
Biographical note: Fleetwood Crouch was born in Calloway County, Kentucky. He trained at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Following basic training he was ordered to France but did not see combat.
Description: Fleetwood Crouch was born in Calloway County, Kentucky. He was drafted and was sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Crouch spoke about his experiences at the camp and conditions in the camp. He mentions being in France but never seeing combat. He recalls the many changes at home when he returned and how prices increased. His also discussed his life as a farmer in Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 September 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH006
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Davis, William G.
Biographical note: William G. Davis was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1892. His parents were John Henry and Minnie Davis. He moved to Paducah, Kentucky when he left the tobacco business. Davis was drafted into the army and received basic training at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was present at Camp Murray in New Jersey during the race riot. He was in the 369th Infantry Regiment of the old 15th New York Regiment while in France Following the war he attended a bible school in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
Description: William G. Davis recollects about how he started in the tobacco business when he was young man. He discusses the First World War and the part he played in the conflict. He spoke about different travels within and outside of the United States. He explains how he entered the ministry and the decisions he made to become a minister. He also spoke about the discrimination he experienced.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH008
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Melugin, Hugh
Biographical note: Hugh Melugin was a resident of Calloway County in Murray, Kentucky. He was born on March 1, 1894, the youngest of five children, and the only member of his family to serve in the First World War. When drafted into the United States Army he was sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky where he stayed for the duration of the war.
Description: Hugh Melugin discusses his experiences during World War I. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1918 and was sent Camp Taylor, Kentucky. His job at Camp Taylor was to manage the payroll and other clerical duties. Melugin mentions how he anticipated going overseas, but never was offered the opportunity. He recalls there not being many noticeable changes in Calloway County during his time in the service. However, he was surprised to find the increase of women in the workforce. He also tells how the automobile had come into popularity following the war. He concludes the interview by telling what it was like to live during the war years.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 September 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH020
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: White, Leslie Lee
Biographical note: Leslie Lee White was born in Little Rock, Arkansas then relocated with his family to Paducah, Kentucky. When he was twenty he traveled to New York City in hopes of finding employment. It was in New York that he enlisted in the United States Army. He traveled overseas on a ship called the U.S.S. Great Northern. White was assigned to Company B, 520th Engineers and was stationed at Brest, France.
Description: Leslie Lee White was born in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1896. He received his education at Lincoln School in Paducah, Kentucky. White discusses the problems encountered by African-American during the early half of the 20th Century. In 1916, he departed Paducah for New York City where he hoped to find employment. He comments on the war, volunteering for service, boot camp and the trans Atlantic voyage to France. He was assigned to the 520th Engineers. His convoy was attacked by a German submarine on the way to France. He recalls the submarine being sunk by an escort ship with the fleet. After the war, White returned to Paducah where he married Maybell Williams. He also mentions his grandmother, who was a slave and her experiences.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH027
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pryor, William
Biographical note: William Pryor was born March 23, 1890 in Benton, Kentucky. He was drafted into the army and sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He then reported to Newport News, Virginia where he remained a month before going to Brest, France by ship. He traveled to places such as Bardou, France and Jazz, France. He remained in Europe until a year after the Armistice was signed.
Description: William Pryor, a resident of Paducah, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in World War I. They include recollections in military training camps, his voyage across the ocean to Europe in a navy convoy and conflicts amongst black and white soldiers. He recalls when he returned home from the war and the fact that the president of the company where he worked killed a man. Pryor mentions his mother who was a slave. He shares the stories she told such as being taught to read by white children, receiving punishment from owners and being set freed. In conclusion, Pryor tells of his move to Paducah, his marriage and the documents he lost in the flood of 1937.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH025
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Williams, Dewey (Part 1)
Biographical note: Dewey Williams was born on July 26, 1899 in Tennessee but grew up in Hazel, Kentucky. He enlisted in the United States Army when he was seventeen. He trained at Salem, New Jersey. He was transported to France where he received more military training and then was stationed in Liverpool, England for the duration of the war. Following the war, he relocated to Arkansas for employment. During the Great Depression, he moved to Detroit, Michigan. He returned to Hazel, Kentucky in 1940.
Description: Dewey Williams, a resident of Hazel, Kentucky, discusses his experiences during World War I and the Great Depression. He recalls the military training he received, the Armistice, being “shell shocked”, the loss of life caused by carelessness with weapons and his return back to the United States. He also discusses the effects of the Great Depression, searching for employment in Detroit and his job making railroad ties.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 September 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH028
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Williams, Dewey (Part 2)
Biographical note: Dewey Williams was born on July 26, 1899 in Tennessee but grew up in Hazel, Kentucky. He enlisted in the United States Army when he was seventeen. He trained at Salem, New Jersey. He was transported to France where he received more military training and then was stationed in Liverpool, England for the duration of the war. Following the war, he relocated to Arkansas for employment. During the Great Depression, he moved to Detroit, Michigan. He returned to Hazel, Kentucky in 1940.
Description: Dewey Williams, a resident of Hazel, Kentucky, discusses his experiences during World War I and the Great Depression. He recalls the military training he received, the Armistice, being “shell shocked”, the loss of life caused by carelessness with weapons and his return back to the United States. He also discusses the effects of the Great Depression, searching for employment in Detroit and his job making railroad ties.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 September 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH028
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Danner, Ceola
Biographical note: Ceola Mae Rogers Danner was born at Paducah, Kentucky in 1916. She attended segregated schools, which included Lincoln Elementary School and Lincoln High School in Paducah, Kentucky. She graduated from high school in 1933 at the age of sixteen. She briefly attended West Kentucky Industrial College but was forced to withdraw due to her father losing his job during the Great Depression. She left West Kentucky Industrial College and worked as a maid and shampoo girl at a beauty shop in Paducah. She married in 1940. When she was 35 years old, she went back to school at West Kentucky Vocational School to take a business course and was hired as a clerk typist at the institution. She died in 1990 at the age of 74 in Paducah.
Description: Ceola Danner discusses her experiences at attending segregated schools, Lincoln Elementary and High School, in Paducah, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She divulges her family’s financial struggle during the Great Depression and how it prevented her from graduating from West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah. She also details her family’s stint as refugees during the Flood of 1937. Danner describes race relations between white and African American communities in Paducah during the 1920s and 1930s and how integration improved social conditions for blacks. Lastly, she tells of her father, Ollie Rogers, and his experience in an all-black cavalry regiment in the United States Army during the Spanish-American War and his efforts to organize a drum and bugle corps in Paducah during the Second World War.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Bates, Mary
Date of interview: 1979 September 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH245
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barclay, Dean (Part 1)
Biographical note: Dean Barclay lived from September 18, 1898 to April 23, 1994 at Clinton, Hickman County, Kentucky. Born to Sam and Ida Jackson, she grew up on her family’s farm and became a public teacher in the county. She married Leonard Ray Barclay, a farmer, in 1935. By 1949, they gave up farming and her husband began a career as a barber.
Description: Dean Barclay details genealogical information in reference to her paternal and maternal families and stories from her lengthy teaching career in Clinton, Kentucky. In addition, she describes life on a Western Kentucky farm prior to 1950, with particular emphasis on the roles of girls and young women. She recalled stories from World War I, the Great Depression and World War II.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicollete
Date of interview: 1980 December 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH232
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barclay, Dean (Part 2)
Biographical note: Dean Barclay lived from September 18, 1898 to April 23, 1994 at Clinton, Hickman County, Kentucky. Born to Sam and Ida Jackson, she grew up on her family’s farm and became a public teacher in the county. She married Leonard Ray Barclay, a farmer, in 1935. By 1949, they gave up farming and her husband began a career as a barber.
Description: Dean Barclay details genealogical information in reference to her paternal and maternal families and stories from her lengthy teaching career in Clinton, Kentucky. In addition, she describes life on a Western Kentucky farm prior to 1950, with particular emphasis on the roles of girls and young women. She recalled stories from World War I, the Great Depression and World War II.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicollete
Date of interview: 1980 December 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH232
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cooper, Alma C.
Biographical note: Alma Cooper was born in Trigg County, Kentucky on July 16, 1911. Her father was a farmer that raised sorghum for the production and distribution of molasses. She attended schools at Turkey Creek and Mitchell Chapel and graduated from Golden Pond High School. She married at age sixteen. Her first husband farmed tobacco and wheat. She did not work outside the home until her husband passed away.
Description: Alma C. Cooper describes the effects of the Great Depression on a rural farming community in Trigg County, Kentucky. She discusses attending one and two room schools and the disciplinary actions enforced by teachers. She recalls listening to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fireside chats on the radio and the coming of the Second World War. She mentions bootleggers at Golden Pond, Kentucky and the Land Between the Lakes region during the prohibition era. She describes that many young men died in her community in the line of military duty and the rise of food prices during the Second World War. Cooper also explains the development of ammunition plants and other armament businesses in Viola and Paducah.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1980 February 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH100
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Adams, Estelle (part 2)
Biographical note: Estelle Adams was born on December 9, 1916 at Murray, Kentucky. Her father was Jim Osborn and her mother was Ethel Clark. Her father farmed and later sharecropped. The family grew corn, beans, tobacco, sorghum and raised pigs and chickens. As a child, she attended the Blood River Church. She and her husband lived in Detroit, Michigan during the Great Depression and Second World War.
Description: Estelle Adams describes life on the family farm in Murray Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She recalls the chores she performed as a child, such as washing dishes, making beds and canning food. She tells of her father trading pigs, chickens and eggs for dry goods at the local grocery store or with traveling peddlers. She discusses medical remedies, church activities and significant regional events during the Great Depression and Second World War. She speaks of local remedies for common colds such as wild cherry bark, sugar, black pepper cough syrup. She recalls attending a week long ‘Big Meeting’ during a Baptist revival. At height of the Great Depression, she stated there was hardly any farm production and that government programs such as the Tennessee Valley Authority and Civilian Conservation Corps provided jobs which planted trees, built farms and paved the city streets of Murray. Adams made extra money ironing, cleaning houses and babysitting during the depression and war years.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1980 February 14 & 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH136
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Adams, Estelle (part 1)
Biographical note: Estelle Adams was born on December 9, 1916 at Murray, Kentucky. Her father was Jim Osborn and her mother was Ethel Clark. Her father farmed and later sharecropped. The family grew corn, beans, tobacco, sorghum and raised pigs and chickens. As a child, she attended the Blood River Church. She and her husband lived in Detroit, Michigan during the Great Depression and Second World War.
Description: Estelle Adams describes life on the family farm in Murray Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She recalls the chores she performed as a child, such as washing dishes, making beds and canning food. She tells of her father trading pigs, chickens and eggs for dry goods at the local grocery store or with traveling peddlers. She discusses medical remedies, church activities and significant regional events during the Great Depression and Second World War. She speaks of local remedies for common colds such as wild cherry bark, sugar, black pepper cough syrup. She recalls attending a week long ‘Big Meeting’ during a Baptist revival. At height of the Great Depression, she stated there was hardly any farm production and that government programs such as the Tennessee Valley Authority and Civilian Conservation Corps provided jobs which planted trees, built farms and paved the city streets of Murray. Adams made extra money ironing, cleaning houses and babysitting during the depression and war years.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1980 February 14 & 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH136
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hatcher, W. O.
Biographical note: W. O. Hatcher was born in Murray, Kentucky on December 21, 1916. His father was a carpenter and a painter and his mother worked at home. His father found work in Hazel when he was in the seventh grade and family relocated there. His father died soon afterwards. He took his first job at his uncle’s tobacco barn for 14 cents an hour at age fifteen. Hatchers worked for the Works Progress Administration pouring concrete streets and for the Civilian Conservation Corps planting pine and locust trees in Murray.
Description: W. O. Hatcher describes his life in Murray and Hazel, Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1940s. He describes that his family home was lit with kerosene lamps, heated by a coal fireplace and drew water from a well in the backyard. He describes his daily chores such as lawn mowing, weeding the garden and picking blackberries and strawberries to sell at the local grocery store. He recalled as a child attending such events as square dances, candy pulling and playing games such as kick the can and hide-and-seek. His childhood dream was to become a mail clerk on a train. During the Great Depression, Hatcher recalled there being a shortage of money to buy food. He mentioned that the depression made it difficult for him to buy shoes and he went without them for months. He described working for the National Youth Administration, the Works Progress Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1980 January 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH109
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Locke, Hazel
Biographical note: Hazel Locke was born in 1906 in Boot Hill, Missouri. Her family moved to Bollinger County when she was seven. Her father cut timber for a living and made railroad ties. She stopped attending school after the eighth grade and married at age seventeen. Her husband was a World War II veteran who worked as a carpenter. In 1950, her husband was hired by the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Paducah, Kentucky. They relocated to Coldwater, Kentucky.
Description: Hazel Locke discusses her childhood in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri and early adulthood in Paducah, Kentucky. She recalls attending a one-room schoolhouse as a child until the eighth grade and describes her household chores such as carrying wood, feeding livestock, housework and making lye soap. She mentions her childhood dream was to become a nurse. She stated the Great Depression as being “hard times” and many feared starvation. She recalls attending “play parties”, which were parties with games, square dancing and live music. Locke told of her brother serving in the United States Navy and being stationed at Pearl Harbor during Japanese attack. She describes a “Brush Arbor Meeting”, which was a revival under a brush pavilion constructed by the church members.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1980 January 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH116
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Gordon, Pearlene
Biographical note: Pearlene Gordon was born in Marshall County, Kentucky in 1918. Her father owned a grocery store and rented farmland. She attended public schools at Aurora, Kentucky and graduated high school in 1936. There were only four in her graduating class. She attended Unity Cumberland Presbyterian Church of Aurora. Gordon married when she was 18 years old. She and her husband moved to Murray, Kentucky to continue her education.
Description: Pearlene Gordon describes her father’s general store in Aurora, Kentucky, which sold groceries, hardware and clothing during the Great Depression. She recalled that not everyone paid in cash, some brought pigs, cows, chickens, and eggs to trade for goods. She reminisced that all the girls wanted to become nurses when she was a child. She mentioned that her family did not own a radio until she was sixteen years old. She described that young ladies started courting and getting married at ages fourteen to sixteen. She mentioned that many families would give their children five acres of land to build a home and farm after marriage. During the Second World War, Gordon recalled that many women performed work that men were accustomed to doing. She also remembered visits from doctors when family members were sick and that the nearest hospital was in Murray.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1980 January 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH107
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Skinner, Ernesteen
Biographical note: Ernesteen Skinner was born on November 15, 1918 in Calloway County, Kentucky. His parents were Buster and Canary Skinner. His father worked packing tobacco at local farms. He attended Douglas High School, an all black school, in Murray, Kentucky. He was an active member of St. John’s Baptist Church and attended numerous revival meetings sponsored by the church. During the Great Depression, he shucked corn and other jobs to survive. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1943 and was sent to Evansville, Indiana for basic training. He finished his training in Florida, where he learned to build air strips. He served in the Pacific Theater and was stationed in New Guinea, French Haven and the Philippines. He also recalls Bob Hope entertaining his unit during the final year of the war.
Description: Ernesteen Skinner discusses his experiences growing up in Murray, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. He also describes his military service in the United States Army Air Corp during the Second World War. He recalls his years attending a segregated school, his family’s struggle during the Great Depression and his participation in the Baptist Church. He mentions the type of military training he received at Evansville, Indiana and his overseas travels during World War II. He also explains how the war changed his outlook on life and the nation’s economic rebound after the war.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1980 March 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH132
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Caldwell, Vivian (Part 1)
Biographical note: Vivian Caldwell was born in Hickman, Kentucky on November 11, 1898 to James Williams and Isabelle Whitley Caldwell. She attended high school at Hickman College, which was later renamed Hickman High School and consolidated into Fulton County High School. She and her class of thirteen total students graduated in 1917. She taught seven months in a one room school in Mississippi County, Missouri. She attended Western Teachers College in Bowling Green, Kentucky full time from February 1, 1918 to October 31, 1918 before returning to Hickman to teach. She returned to college fulltime from 1921 to 1922 and part time during summer terms until she graduated in June of 1928. Since there were no math openings in Hickman, she taught high school math and English in Campbellsville, Kentucky and later in Franklin, Kentucky. From September 1929 until she retired in May 1969, she taught high school in Hickman. She died at Hickman on June 1, 1984.
Description: Vivian Caldwell discusses the long process to attain her degree in education at Western Kentucky State Normal School (presently Western Kentucky University), stating that she was unable to attend college without periodic breaks to acquire funds for tuition and other expenses. She recalls her salaries as a teacher, what it was like teaching during the Great Depression, her experiences at Hickman High School and the desegregation and consolidation of the schools in Fulton County.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicollete
Date of interview: 1980 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH237
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Caldwell, Vivian (Part 2)
Biographical note: Vivian Caldwell was born in Hickman, Kentucky on November 11, 1898 to James Williams and Isabelle Whitley Caldwell. She attended high school at Hickman College, which was later renamed Hickman High School and consolidated into Fulton County High School. She and her class of thirteen total students graduated in 1917. She taught seven months in a one room school in Mississippi County, Missouri. She attended Western Teachers College in Bowling Green, Kentucky full time from February 1, 1918 to October 31, 1918 before returning to Hickman to teach. She returned to college fulltime from 1921 to 1922 and part time during summer terms until she graduated in June of 1928. Since there were no math openings in Hickman, she taught high school math and English in Campbellsville, Kentucky and later in Franklin, Kentucky. From September 1929 until she retired in May 1969, she taught high school in Hickman. She died at Hickman on June 1, 1984.
Description: Vivian Caldwell discusses the long process to attain her degree in education at Western Kentucky State Normal School (presently Western Kentucky University), stating that she was unable to attend college without periodic breaks to acquire funds for tuition and other expenses. She recalls her salaries as a teacher, what it was like teaching during the Great Depression, her experiences at Hickman High School and the desegregation and consolidation of the schools in Fulton County.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicollete
Date of interview: 1980 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH237
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Latta, Willie Pharris (part 1)
Biographical note: Willie Pharris Latta was born in Hickman County, Kentucky in 1894. Her father operated an orchard, sold timber and cut logs to build houses. He contracted mastoiditis and died of complications while she was a child. After his death, her mother continued to manage the orchard and sell lumber. At a young age, she contracts typhoid fever from contaminated water in Hickman County. She began school at Mount Moriah but later attended Mount Pleasant. After high school, she moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky to attend college. At age 17, she passed the teacher’s a placement exam and soon afterwards began teaching. In 1912, she married her husband Warren. He managed a farm and raised cattle and chickens. She attended church at Mount Moriah Baptist Church and later Mount Pleasant Methodist Church.
Description: Willie Pharris Latta describes her experiences growing up in rural Hickman County, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. She discusses the public schools she attended and making 50 cents an hour staying after class to cleaning chalkboards, sweep and dust. She reflects upon her experiences during the Great Depression and recalls the government rationing certain foods. She mentions her church affiliations and participating in Baptist revivals.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicolette
Date of interview: 1980 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH134
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Latta, Willie Pharris (part 2)
Biographical note: Willie Pharris Latta was born in Hickman County, Kentucky in 1894. Her father operated an orchard, sold timber and cut logs to build houses. He contracted mastoiditis and died of complications while she was a child. After his death, her mother continued to manage the orchard and sell lumber. At a young age, she contracts typhoid fever from contaminated water in Hickman County. She began school at Mount Moriah but later attended Mount Pleasant. After high school, she moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky to attend college. At age 17, she passed the teacher’s a placement exam and soon afterwards began teaching. In 1912, she married her husband Warren. He managed a farm and raised cattle and chickens. She attended church at Mount Moriah Baptist Church and later Mount Pleasant Methodist Church.
Description: Willie Pharris Latta describes her experiences growing up in rural Hickman County, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. She discusses the public schools she attended and making 50 cents an hour staying after class to cleaning chalkboards, sweep and dust. She reflects upon her experiences during the Great Depression and recalls the government rationing certain foods. She mentions her church affiliations and participating in Baptist revivals.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicolette
Date of interview: 1980 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH134
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Humphreys, Edna (part 1)
Biographical note: Edna Humphreys was born on February 23, 1907 to Robert Walter Henderson and Tammy B. Campbell Henderson of Graves County, Kentucky. She had six siblings and her father died before the last child was born. Her father was a sharecropper that grew tobacco.
Description: Edna Humphreys describes her life in rural Graves County, Kentucky. She describes the process of growing tobacco and the numerous chores associated with sharecropping. She recalled that school was only in session for six months because many of the children worked during planting and harvest season. She remembered her family singing and playing music as a means of entertainment. She discusses childhood plying games, attending parties and dances, making feather beds and sewing quilts with patterns passed down from generation to generation. She tells of a family storm shelter that contained canned goods and other items needed in case of a tornado or other emergency. She remembers a cow and a small patch of land to grow tobacco were given to her father by the owner of the farm to assist with family expenses. Humphreys also recalls how the United States government contracted her husband to grow hemp during the period between First and Second World War for the use of making rope. She mentions how the Great Depression greatly affected her family and when the government introduced DDT to farms in the county.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicolette
Date of interview: 1980 October 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH114
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Humphreys, Edna (part 2)
Biographical note: Edna Humphreys was born on February 23, 1907 to Robert Walter Henderson and Tammy B. Campbell Henderson of Graves County, Kentucky. She had six siblings and her father died before the last child was born. Her father was a sharecropper that grew tobacco.
Description: Edna Humphreys describes her life in rural Graves County, Kentucky. She describes the process of growing tobacco and the numerous chores associated with sharecropping. She recalled that school was only in session for six months because many of the children worked during planting and harvest season. She remembered her family singing and playing music as a means of entertainment. She discusses childhood plying games, attending parties and dances, making feather beds and sewing quilts with patterns passed down from generation to generation. She tells of a family storm shelter that contained canned goods and other items needed in case of a tornado or other emergency. She remembers a cow and a small patch of land to grow tobacco were given to her father by the owner of the farm to assist with family expenses. Humphreys also recalls how the United States government contracted her husband to grow hemp during the period between First and Second World War for the use of making rope. She mentions how the Great Depression greatly affected her family and when the government introduced DDT to farms in the county.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Murray, Nicolette
Date of interview: 1980 October 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH114
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Belote, Jack (Session 1)
Biographical note: Jack Belote, a native of Mayfield, Kentucky, was a 1941 graduate of Murray State Teachers College with a degree in biology and mathematics. He was drafted into the United States Navy in 1941. During the war he was stationed at St. Louis, Missouri, Jacksonville, Florida, Corpus Christi, Texas and Murray, Kentucky. At Murray, he served as a naval flight guidance instructor for the Naval Preparatory School. He died on April 12, 2009.
Description: Jack Belote offers details into his experiences during the Second World War. He spent four and one-half years as a naval training officer in the United States Navy and was part of the Naval Preparatory School at Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). He discusses the various duties assigned to him during the war, such as naval flight guidance instructor and rations officer. He recounts his experiences when Pearl Harbor was attacked and the reaction of his fellow officers. He concludes by describing life in the Jackson Purchase of Kentucky area prior to the war and how it had changed after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1981 December 07
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH138
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Eldridge, Charles
Biographical note: Charles Eldridge was born in Hamlin, Kentucky sometime in the early 1920s. After graduating from high school in New Concord, Kentucky, he attended Murray State Teacher’s College (currently Murray State University). In March of 1943, he was drafted into the infantry and sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. He was later assigned to the 75th Division and stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. He severely injured his leg during a training exercise and spent the remainder of the war at O’Reilly Veterans Hospital at Springfield, Missouri. Discharged in October 1945, he returned to Murray State Teachers College and after graduation was employed by the college.
Description: Charles Eldridge offers details into his experiences during the Second World War. He describes life in Calloway County, Kentucky prior to and after the war. He was drafted and stationed at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana and later at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Injured in a training accident at Fort Leonard Wood, he spent the remainder of the war at O’Reilly Veterans Hospital in Springfield, Missouri. He recalls his experiences at the hospital and with the Veterans Administration. He describes the general opinion of the people of Calloway County following the war and its effect upon the community. He concludes by mentioning significant individuals and events during the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1981 December 1981
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH140
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Forrest C. Pogue discusses the evolution of oral history techniques from the Second World War to the 1970s. He also compares and contrasts interviewing philosophies and types of oral histories.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Elliott, David M.
Date of interview: 1981 November 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Forrest C. Pogue discusses the evolution of oral history techniques from the Second World War to the 1970s. He also compares and contrasts interviewing philosophies and types of oral histories.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Elliott, David M.
Date of interview: 1981 November 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Garrott, Morris C.
Biographical note: Morris C. Garrott was born in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1918. Prior to the Second World War, he attended Murray State Teacher’s College (now Murray State University) from 1936 to 1940. He also worked at the local Pigly-Wiggly and for the Mayfield Messenger. He was drafted in Mayfield and sworn-in at Louisville on April 3, 1941. He was first sent to Fort Thomas, Kentucky then to Fort Knox, Kentucky as part of a Railhead Company. In February of 1942, he attended Officer Candidates School (OCS) for training. He was later stationed at Fort Livingston, Louisiana and Fort Sam Houston, Texas before being sent to France as the company commander of the 3537th Unit Replacement Company. He was en route to the Philippines at the end of war but rerouted to Boston, Massachusetts for discharge. After the war, he returned to work for the Mayfield Messenger as a journalist in Harlan, Kentucky.
Description: Morris C. Garrott details his experiences during the Second World War. He discusses his duties as an enlisted soldier, training at the Officer Candidates School (OCS) and duties as the company commander of the 3537th Unit Replacement Company in the United States and Europe. He provides anecdotes of his experiences in the military, as well as individuals from Mayfield, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Elliott, David
Date of interview: 1981 October 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH144
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Metzger, Fritz
Biographical note: Fritz Metzger was a resident of Paducah, Kentucky before he was drafted into the war. He trained first at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky then on to Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was ordered overseas and landed in Brest, France. He was sent to the front lines at Vallendar, Germany. He saw combat at the Battle at Belleau Wood. Metzger returned to Paducah after he received his discharge and worked for his father in the meat business.
Description: Fritz Metzger discusses his World War I experiences. He was twenty one years old when he was drafted into an infantry unit of the 2nd Division of the United States Army. He trained at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky and later at Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas. Metzger recollects the living conditions and moral of American troops on the Western Front and describes his combat experiences. He mentions contact with German troops and serving in the occupational forces in Germany when the war concluded. He offers details on the reaction of people of the signing of the Armistice. Metzger also explains why he thought the war was just, some of the benefits he received from the war and key incidents which stood out most in his mind during the war, including the battle at Belleau Wood.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 December 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH021
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pinkley, L. K.
Biographical note: L. K. Pinkley was born in Buena Vista, Carroll County, Tennessee. His family moved to the Jackson Purchase area of Kentucky in 1934. Prior to the Second World War, he worked as a sales representative for the Davison Chemical Corporation in Nashville, Tennessee. He was drafted in 1943 and assigned to the 106th Infantry Division at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He was ordered to Europe in 1944 and was present at the Battle of the Bulge, where he was captured by the Germans under the command of Field Marshall Gerd von Rundstedt. He was a prisoner at Stalag IX-B, Bad Orb for a month before being sent to Stalag IX-A, Ziegenhain. He was liberated by the 65th Infantry Division accompanied by the 6th Armored Division on March 30, 1945. He was then taken to Camp Lucky Strike, Janville, France and arrived back in the United States on May 13, 1945.
Description: L. K. Pinkley details his experiences during the Second World War. He begins by describing his family background, being drafted into the United States Army and his military assignments. The interview mainly focuses upon his capture during the Battle of the Bulge and imprisonment by the Germans. He describes life as a prisoner of war in Germany and concludes with the liberation of the prison camp on March 30, 1945.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Elliott, David
Date of interview: 1982 May 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH149
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hornbeak, Paul
Biographical note: Paul Hornbeak was born in Tennessee and went to school in Nashville. He attended basic training at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky.
Description: Paul Hornbeak, a 94 year old veteran of both World Wars, discusses his wartime experiences in the First World War. He served with a company of bakers during the war and worked with his brother as a businessman between the wars.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 November 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH016
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Yates, Nathan Tubb
Biographical note: Nathan Yates was a resident of Fulton County, Kentucky. He volunteered for the United States Navy. He was stationed at San Diego, California and remained there for the duration of his navy career.
Description: Nathan Tubb Yates served in the United States Naval Reserve during the First World War. He was stationed in San Diego, California and remained there through duration of the war. He discusses his military duties, the rivalry between the army and navy units and a football game between the two military branches that broke out into a heated brawl.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted and Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 November 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH030
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Milam, Carl (Part 1)
Biographical note: Carl Milam was a resident of Tennessee. His basic training was in Dresden, Tennessee and later to Knoxville. He was ordered to Jacksonville, Florida for training in motor transport. Milam then traveled to New York to board a ship to travel to Brest, France.
Description: Carl Milam recalls his experiences during World War I. He offers general background information and shares his thoughts regarding the war. He mentions his basic training and reluctance to go to war. Other topics discussed include: his reaction to President Woodrow Wilson’s declaration of war; his trip overseas; impressions of the French people; camp conditions, troop morale; his attitude toward the Armistice; the return trip to the United States; receiving his discharge; contact with other veterans; the justification of the war; race relations overseas and the rewards of army life.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 October 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH022
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Milam, Carl (Part 2)
Biographical note: Carl Milam was a resident of Tennessee. His basic training was in Dresden, Tennessee and later to Knoxville. He was ordered to Jacksonville, Florida for training in motor transport. Milam then traveled to New York to board a ship to travel to Brest, France.
Description: Carl Milam recalls his experiences during World War I. He offers general background information and shares his thoughts regarding the war. He mentions his basic training and reluctance to go to war. Other topics discussed include: his reaction to President Woodrow Wilson’s declaration of war; his trip overseas; impressions of the French people; camp conditions, troop morale; his attitude toward the Armistice; the return trip to the United States; receiving his discharge; contact with other veterans; the justification of the war; race relations overseas and the rewards of army life.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 October 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH022
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hainline, Carl
Biographical note: Carl Hainline was drafted into the United States Army in 1918. He was working as a mechanic in Kansas City, Missouri. He was sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky and then to Camp Sherman in Iowa. He was assigned to the 158th Field Artillery Brigade. He was sent to Hoboken, New Jersey to board a ship going to Liverpool, England then on to France. When the armistice was signed he was sent to Germany.
Description: Carl Hainline, a resident of Fulton, Kentucky, discusses his World War I experiences. The topics discussed include: his general feelings about the war in Europe; feelings about President Woodrow Wilson and the United States entrance into the War; enlistment and military unit information; basic training camps; his trip overseas; morale of the solders; warfare and casualties; entertainment; receiving mail; the role of occupational forces in Germany during the post war period; returning home and seeking employment; contact with service friends and the black troops that were overseas.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH012
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Coffman, Ellwyn
Biographical note: Ellwyn Coffman was a resident of Fulton, Kentucky. He was attending college in Bowling Green, Kentucky when the war broke out. He traveled to Louisville, Kentucky to enlist in the army. He was first stationed at Fort Thomas, Kentucky where he was put to work in the bakery. His basic training was in Fort Riley, Kansas. He was sent to Camp Merritt, New Jersey before he was transported overseas to Brest, France. He was discharged from the army and return on the U.S.S. Mount Vernon.
Description: Ellwyn Coffman discusses his many diverse experiences and adventures in the United States Army during the First World War. Included in the interview are a personal glimpse of the European culture and humorous anecdotes as told from an American perspective. Included in the interview are his different experiences in the Jackson Purchase Area and his international seed business.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH007
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Butler, Hughie (part 2)
Biographical note: Hughie Butler was a resident of Fulton, Kentucky who served in the United States Navy during the First World War. He was inducted into the Navy at age 18 on May 5, 1918. He attended basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station near Chicago, Illinois. He was transferred from one camp to another before he was stationed at Camp Ross at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. He then took a train from New York to New Jersey to board the ship U.S.S. Leviathan to go to Brest, France. A train took him to Trompeloup, France where they were building a naval air station. He worked in the medical corps in the Pulliac region of France. He returned aboard the U.S.S. Imperitor.
Description: Hughie Butler, a resident of Fulton, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in the United States Navy during the First World War. Included in the discussion are such topics as basic training, overseas travel, the 1918 flu epidemic, and the everyday life of a sailor during the war. Mr. Butler also describes the attitudes the French people toward American soldiers and cultural change on the home front following the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 October 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH002
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Butler, Hughie (part 1)
Biographical note: Hughie Butler was a resident of Fulton, Kentucky who served in the United States Navy during the First World War. He was inducted into the Navy at age 18 on May 5, 1918. He attended basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station near Chicago, Illinois. He was transferred from one camp to another before he was stationed at Camp Ross at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. He then took a train from New York to New Jersey to board the ship U.S.S. Leviathan to go to Brest, France. A train took him to Trompeloup, France where they were building a naval air station. He worked in the medical corps in the Pulliac region of France. He returned aboard the U.S.S. Imperitor.
Description: Hughie Butler, a resident of Fulton, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in the United States Navy during the First World War. Included in the discussion are such topics as basic training, overseas travel, the 1918 flu epidemic, and the everyday life of a sailor during the war. Mr. Butler also describes the attitudes the French people toward American soldiers and cultural change on the home front following the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 October 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH002
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ford, James P. (part 2)
Biographical note: James P. Ford was born in Silvis, Illinois in 1921. He dropped out of school after the 8th grade and began working as a soda jerk and later for a news agency. In 1937, he joined a Civilian Conservation Corps camp. Two years later, he worked for a foundry in Mullen, Illinois. He joined the Marine Corps in 1940 and trained at San Diego, California. He was stationed at Corregidor, Philippines when Bataan fell to the Japanese in early 1942. He was made a prisoner of war and sent to a camp near Cabanatuan, the Philippines. He was liberated by the United States 1st Calvary in September of 1944. After the war, he received his General Educational Development (GED) and attended Roosevelt College (currently Roosevelt University) at Chicago, Illinois.
Description: James P. Ford details his experiences during the Second World War. He provides his pre-war background and motivation for entering the United States Marine Corps prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Stationed at Corregidor, Philippines, he discusses the day to day activities of the fortress before the Japanese attack and the events during the battle. He describes his capture, time spent as a prisoner of war at Cabanatuan and his liberation by American troops in September of 1944. He concludes by discussing his return to the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1982 September 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH143
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ford, James P. (part 1)
Biographical note: James P. Ford was born in Silvis, Illinois in 1921. He dropped out of school after the 8th grade and began working as a soda jerk and later for a news agency. In 1937, he joined a Civilian Conservation Corps camp. Two years later, he worked for a foundry in Mullen, Illinois. He joined the Marine Corps in 1940 and trained at San Diego, California. He was stationed at Corregidor, Philippines when Bataan fell to the Japanese in early 1942. He was made a prisoner of war and sent to a camp near Cabanatuan, the Philippines. He was liberated by the United States 1st Calvary in September of 1944. After the war, he received his General Educational Development (GED) and attended Roosevelt College (currently Roosevelt University) at Chicago, Illinois.
Description: James P. Ford details his experiences during the Second World War. He provides his pre-war background and motivation for entering the United States Marine Corps prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Stationed at Corregidor, Philippines, he discusses the day to day activities of the fortress before the Japanese attack and the events during the battle. He describes his capture, time spent as a prisoner of war at Cabanatuan and his liberation by American troops in September of 1944. He concludes by discussing his return to the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1982 September 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH143
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hendon, Cassie
Biographical note: Cassie Hendon was born in Calloway County. She lived on State Line Road. She married Rubert Richard Hendon on December 13, 1917. She followed her husband to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky where he enlisted.
Description: Cassie Hendon discusses her experiences as a solder’s wife during the First World War. She mentions general information about her family, education, occupation, and her marriage. Hendon tells how she first heard about the war and her feelings when her husband enlisted. She explained how it was to be a young bride living near her husband at Camp Taylor, Kentucky. She also discussed such things as the amount of contact she had with her husband, entertainment during the war, rationing, involvement in war activities, the community’s reaction to the war, and race relations in the community. Hendon speaks about the effects of the war on women and concludes by giving her and her husbands reflections on the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Wigginton, Melinda A.
Date of interview: 1983 April 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH015
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ham, John E.
Biographical note: John E. Pike was a canteen manager at Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was later stationed at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. When the Armistice was signed Pike returned to Paducah, Kentucky, where he spent the remainder of his life.
Description: John E. Ham, a World War I veteran, discuses his wartime activities. He describes basic training and relays humorous stories relating to camp life. He mentions camp conditions, morale, furloughs, visits home, recreation and entertainment, and his activities in Little Rock, Arkansas as a canteen manager. Ham offers his impressions of the war from his perspective and the reactions to the armistice. He also discusses the 1920’s, the justification for the war, the importance of newspapers during the war and his contacts with fellow World War I veterans.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH013
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hunt, Johnson
Biographical note: Johnson Hunt, a resident of Mayfield, Kentucky, was ordered to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky for basic training and then sent to a military camp located in South Carolina for specialized training. There he became a member of the First Pioneer Infantry. Hunt was ordered to New Jersey and transported to Brest, France. The war had ended prior to his arrival in Europe. He returned to Camp Taylor to be discharged from the service.
Description: Johnson Hunt, a World War I veteran, discusses his wartime experiences. Hunt was 27 years old when he was drafted in the United States Army in 1918. He received basic training at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Hunt belonged to the First Pioneer Infantry. Other topics discussed include; camp life; trips overseas; being on three different fronts during the war; contact with German prisoners; gas attacks; morale on the fronts; repairing roads; reaction of the men when the armistice was signed; being a member of the occupational forces in Germany; race relations; and the return home following the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH017
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Knight, Charles L.
Biographical note: Charles Knight was a farmer prior to being drafted into the United States Army. He was sent to basic training in Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky where he trained to be a prison guard. When discharged from the army, Knight relocated to Barlow, Kentucky.
Description: Charles Knight discusses his experiences during the First World War. Included in the discussions are his recollections of basic training, his responsibilities guarding prisoners and the different types of prisoners held in confinement. Knight served in the United States Army for six months before contracting the flu and being medically discharged. He mentions the entertainment and recreation provided to American soldiers. Knight also explains his justification for joining the war effort, outlook on life and contacts with fellow veterans of the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH019
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: James, Arthur
Biographical note: Arthur James lived in Barlow, Kentucky before he enlisted in the United States Army. James was stationed first at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis Missouri then on to [Camp Merritt, Cantonment] in New Jersey for basic training. He was in the medical corps, Ambulance Company No. 8, 68th Division. When basic training was concluded he boarded the ship U.S.S. Kilpatrick in Hoboken, New Jersey and headed to Carzelle, Panama. Following the war he was stationed at Camp Shelby in Hattiesburg, Mississippi then was discharged at Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Description: Arthur James, a resident of Barlow, Kentucky, discusses his experiences during the First World War. Included in the interview are his feelings about the war, his training to be in the ambulance service, the differences in military camps and the changes that occurred following the war. He explains why he served in Panama rather than in Europe. He also discusses the type of work he did after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1983 June 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH018
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Flowers, Jesse P.
Biographical note: Jesses Flowers was drafted in 1918 and sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison in Lawrence, Indiana and later to Camp Mills in New York from there he sailed from New Jersey to Brest, France.
Description: Jesse Flowers discusses his experiences during World War I. He was working for the Illinois Central Railroad Company when the war broke out. He mentions the training camps, feelings toward President Woodrow Wilson, the trip overseas, belonging to the 22nd Engineer Regiment, his military duties, the front lines, reconstruction after the war, contact with both French and German soldiers, relationships between officers and enlisted men and the way his fellow soldiers felt about the war. Flowers also recalled the trip back to the United States and the changes he witnessed after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH010
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Basham, Sam
Biographical note: Sam Basham was a resident of Mayfield, Kentucky who served in the United States Army during the First World War. After enlistment he took basic training at Camp Gordon near Atlanta, Georgia. Following basic training, he was transferred to Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont. He was discharged from the army at Fort Ayers, Massachusetts on December 11, 1918. .
Description: Sam Basham, a resident of Mayfield, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in the United States Army during the First World War. Basham describes life as a soldier on the home front. The topics discussed include camp life, basic training, relationships between officers and enlisted men and post war issues.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Waldrop, H. T. (Part 2)
Biographical note: H. T. Waldrop was a resident of Murray, Kentucky. He served in the United States Navy for two years during the war but never saw overseas duty. He served at Newport, Rhode Island.
Description: H. T. Waldrop discusses his duties in the United States Navy during World War I. He served for two years and was in charge of managing a naval recreation center at Covington Point in Newport, Rhode Island. When he returned from the war he held many jobs including postmaster and oil well driller.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Wigginton, Melinda A. and Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1983 May 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH026
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Sutliff, Earl M.
Biographical note: Earl M. Sutliff was born in Princeton, Illinois around 1910. Prior to the Second World War, he was a store manager for Brown Lynch Scott Department Store in Aledo, Illinois. He was drafted into the United States Navy in 1943 and was stationed at Camp Peary, Virginia for basic training. During the war, he served with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts at Cleveland, Ohio. He later was stationed at Mobile, Alabama, San Bruno, California, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Manila, the Philippines, Guam, and Chicago, Illinois. He was discharged from the military in Chicago in November of 1945.
Description: Earl M. Sutliff describes his experiences during the Second World War. He describes his training and duties with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts at Cleveland, Ohio and his travels to the Philippines and Guam to distribute pay to service personnel following the Japanese occupation. He discusses the war-torn areas he visited during the war and recounts post-war celebrations, benefits to servicemen and his discharge from the military.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1983 October 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH152
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Old, Clell Cecil (Part 1)
Biographical note: Clell Cecil Old was born on June 27, 1894 in Nashville, Tennessee. He was drafted into the United States Army when he resided in Henry County, Tennessee. He trained at Camp Gordon in Atlanta, Georgia then at the Civil War battlefield at Chickamauga, Georgia. He left from New York to go to Brest, France on April 6, 1918. He traveled aboard the U.S.S Covington. Old was wounded in Argonne Forest and later received a Purple Heart.
Description: Clell Cecil Old, a World War I veteran, discusses his service in the United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment, from 1917 and 1918. He was wounded in Argonne Forest in October of 1918. He received a Purple Heart for his wound in May of 1980.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pritchard, Peggy
Date of interview: 1985 September 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH029
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Old, Clell Cecil (Part 2)
Biographical note: Clell Cecil Old was born on June 27, 1894 in Nashville, Tennessee. He was drafted into the United States Army when he resided in Henry County, Tennessee. He trained at Camp Gordon in Atlanta, Georgia then at the Civil War battlefield at Chickamauga, Georgia. He left from New York to go to Brest, France on April 6, 1918. He traveled aboard the U.S.S Covington. Old was wounded in Argonne Forest and later received a Purple Heart.
Description: Clell Cecil Old, a World War I veteran, discusses his service in the United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment, from 1917 and 1918. He was wounded in Argonne Forest in October of 1918. He received a Purple Heart for his wound in May of 1980.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pritchard, Peggy
Date of interview: 1985 September 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH029
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Rowlett, Arthur W.
Biographical note: Arthur W. Rowlett was born on August 12, 1900 in New Concord, Kentucky and relocation to Murray, Kentucky in 1909. In 1918 he was scheduled to depart for military training for the First World War, however the Armistice was signed days before he was to depart and his training was canceled. Prior to the Second World War, he worked making tobacco twists in Calloway County, Kentucky. He was drafted in 1942 and sent to the Jefferson Barracks Military Post at St. Louis, Missouri for basic training. From there he was stationed at March Field, California and was discharged in 1943 due to his age. After being discharged he returned to Murray where he worked on a farm and later as a chauffeur for a local physician.
Description: Arthur W. Rowlett details his brief experience as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes his employment prior to the war and recalls where he was when Pearl Harbor was attached. He mentions his brief spell in the United States Army, his discharge and racial issues he either witnessed or experienced. He concludes the interview with a discussion on his employment opportunities following his discharge.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH157
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Dillard, Golden (part 1)
Biographical note: Golden Dillard was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on October 2, 1912. He moved to Toledo, Ohio in 1928. He returned to Calloway County, Kentucky in 1939 and worked for 2 ½ years at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp near Murray, Kentucky. He was drafted and entered the United States Army in 1942. He trained at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi. He was assigned to motor-pool division and spent time in Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia and Camp Shanks, New York. He was sent overseas and was involved in the European theater of the war. When the war concluded he was assigned to Camp Atterbury, Indiana and was later discharged in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He returned to Murray, Kentucky and later assisted in the development of an American Legion Post in that city. He was its commander from 1976 to 1982.
Description: Golden Dillard details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes his life prior to war and the time he spent in the Civilian Conservation Corps near Murray, Kentucky. During the war, he was stationed or at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi, Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia, Camp Shanks, New York, Camp Atterbury, Indiana and overseas bases in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium and Germany. He details his duties as part of the United States Army Motor Pool and activities throughout the war. He claimed to have been the personal driver of General Dwight D. Eisenhower for three months while stationed at Frankfurt, Germany. He concludes with his post-war experiences and work with the American Legion Post in Murray, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH154
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Dillard, Golden (part 2)
Biographical note: Golden Dillard was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on October 2, 1912. He moved to Toledo, Ohio in 1928. He returned to Calloway County, Kentucky in 1939 and worked for 2 ½ years at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp near Murray, Kentucky. He was drafted and entered the United States Army in 1942. He trained at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi. He was assigned to motor-pool division and spent time in Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia and Camp Shanks, New York. He was sent overseas and was involved in the European theater of the war. When the war concluded he was assigned to Camp Atterbury, Indiana and was later discharged in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He returned to Murray, Kentucky and later assisted in the development of an American Legion Post in that city. He was its commander from 1976 to 1982.
Description: Golden Dillard details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes his life prior to war and the time he spent in the Civilian Conservation Corps near Murray, Kentucky. During the war, he was stationed or at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi, Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia, Camp Shanks, New York, Camp Atterbury, Indiana and overseas bases in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium and Germany. He details his duties as part of the United States Army Motor Pool and activities throughout the war. He claimed to have been the personal driver of General Dwight D. Eisenhower for three months while stationed at Frankfurt, Germany. He concludes with his post-war experiences and work with the American Legion Post in Murray, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH154
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Greer, Henry
Biographical note: Henry Greer was born on July 19, 1935 at Springhill, Kentucky. He attended the all black school of Riverview High School at Hickman, Kentucky. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1953 and sent to basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He was assigned to Company G, 101st Airborne Division and sent to Fort Gordon, Georgia where he attended Military Police School. He was stationed at Bremerhaven, Germany and Verdun, France as a Military Police officer. He was discharged from the Army in 1956 at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Later that same year, he enlisted with the United States Air Force and was stationed at Castle Air Force Base, Merced, California as a Military Police officer. Greer was discharged in 1960 and afterwards relocated to Clinton, Kentucky. In 1967, he began a career as a truck driver.
Description: Henry Greer details his experiences as an African American soldier in the United States Army and Air Force from 1953 through 1960. He describes his background and attitudes towards the Korean Conflict. He discusses his duties and encounters as an enlisted soldier in the Military Police in Bremerhaven, Germany and Verdun, France. He further describes his discharge and reenlistment in the United States Air Force. Greer mentions his experiences serving as a military policeman at Castle Air Force Base, Merced, California and his final discharge in 1960. He concludes with a discussion on racial issues while growing up in West Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH155
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Wilkins, Joe (part 2)
Biographical note: Joe Wilkins was born March 9, 1920 in Henry County, Tennessee. Prior to the Second World War, he worked as a night man at a hotel. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1941 and attended basic training at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Georgia and was stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey. During the war, he was stationed in the United Kingdom, Algeria, Italy and France. He participated in both the North African and Italian Campaigns. He saw action during the Allied invasion of Italy at Salerno and the Battle of Anzio. He was discharged in September of 1945. After the war, he worked as a truck driver. Wilkins reenlisted into the United States Army in 1950 at Fort Lewis, Washington and was stationed in Korea during the Korean War. He was discharged at Fort Lewis following the war.
Description: Joe Wilkins recounts his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War and Korean War. He describes his training prior to United States entry in the war. He provides an account of events in North Africa and Italy and his participation in those campaigns. He discusses his civilian occupations and life between the Second World War and the Korean War. Wilkins concluded the interview by recalling his participation in the Korean War and racial issues he witnessed in the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH158
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Wilkins, Joe (part 1)
Biographical note: Joe Wilkins was born March 9, 1920 in Henry County, Tennessee. Prior to the Second World War, he worked as a night man at a hotel. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1941 and attended basic training at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Georgia and was stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey. During the war, he was stationed in the United Kingdom, Algeria, Italy and France. He participated in both the North African and Italian Campaigns. He saw action during the Allied invasion of Italy at Salerno and the Battle of Anzio. He was discharged in September of 1945. After the war, he worked as a truck driver. Wilkins reenlisted into the United States Army in 1950 at Fort Lewis, Washington and was stationed in Korea during the Korean War. He was discharged at Fort Lewis following the war.
Description: Joe Wilkins recounts his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War and Korean War. He describes his training prior to United States entry in the war. He provides an account of events in North Africa and Italy and his participation in those campaigns. He discusses his civilian occupations and life between the Second World War and the Korean War. Wilkins concluded the interview by recalling his participation in the Korean War and racial issues he witnessed in the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH158
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cowan, Thurman
Biographical note: Thurman Cowan was born on September 4, 1924 in Henry County, Tennessee. Prior to the Second World War, he resided in Paris, Tennessee and worked on the construction of Camp Tyson. At seventeen, he moved to Chicago, Illinois and worked in a mattress factory until he was drafted into the United States Marines in August of 1943. He trained with an African American regiment at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. He was first stationed at Pearl Harbor then at Guam. When the war concluded, he returned to Camp Lejeune and was discharged on February 28, 1946. After the war, he worked for the Electrical Division of General Motors and for the Chicago Main Post Office.
Description: Thurman Cowan details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes the construction of Camp Tyson at Paris, Tennessee prior to the United States entering the war. He discusses his military duties while serving the United States Marines as a “mess-man”, life in Hawaii and Guam during the war and racial issues he encountered while in the military. Cowan concludes the interview with his discharge and his post-war life in Chicago, Illinois.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1986 October 23
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH153
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Perry, Charles W.
Biographical note: Charles W. “Dub” Perry was born in Almo, Kentucky on November 11, 1918. At nineteen he moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee. In March of 1941, he volunteered for the United States Army and attended Fort Belvoir, Virginia for basic training and was stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina with the 96th Battalion, Corps of Engineers. When the Second World War began he was shipped to Townsville, Australia and fought in the New Guinea Campaign. He remained in New Guinea for thirty four months. While on a three month furlough in the United States he was diagnosed with gastritis and discharged at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.
Description: Charles W. “Dub” Perry details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes volunteering for the United States Army and training at Fort Belvoir, Virginia and Fort Bragg, North Carolina. During the war, he was stationed at Fort Belvoir, Fort Bragg, Fort Indiantown Gap, Brooklyn, the Barbados Islands, Australia, New Guinea, San Francisco Camp Atterbury, Atlantic City, and Fort Leonard Wood. He details the missions he was involved during the New Guinea Campaign and concludes with his medical discharge in 1945.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 October 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH156
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 6)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 4)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 3)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 5)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Whayne, Joan Butterworth (part 2)
Biographical note: Joan Butterworth Whayne was born in 1925 at Bowling Green, Kentucky. Her father established the Butterworth Clinic in Murray, Kentucky. She attended the Murray Training School where she graduated at age sixteen in 1942. She began college the following fall at Murray State Teachers College. She remained at Murray State for three years but transferred to University of Kentucky. After she graduated in 1946, she spent time in Washington D.C., Memphis, New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Fort Worth. She returned to Murray where her husband worked for Whayne’s father at the Butterworth Clinic. Later in life, her husband worked as a regional medical officer in Europe, Asia and South America.
Description: Joan Butterworth Whayne describes her life experiences from the 1930s to the 1970s. She describes her childhood in Calloway County, Kentucky during the Great Depression and the Second World War. She recalls attending the Murray State Training School, social activities and regional events. She remembers her college years, extracurricular activities and career as a real estate agent. She describes her travels with her husband, who was a medic in the United States Army, during and following the Second World War. She also mentions her father being overseas during the First World War.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH129
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barker, Charlotte O.
Biographical note: Charlotte O. Barker was born in 1921 at Murray, Kentucky. She was the daughter of Leland Owen and Myrta Kirkland Barker. She graduated Murray High School in 1937 at age seventeen. She attended Murray State Teachers College and after graduation taught for the city school system for over 30 years. She was active in the Murray Methodist Church and taught youth groups. During the Second World War, Barker worked at the library at Murray State Teachers College and as a secretary for the Murray Electric Company. She returned college in 1950 to acquire a Masters degree in education.
Description: Charlotte O. Barker was a public teacher and lifelong resident of Murray, Kentucky. She describes growing up in small college town during the Great Depression, the Second World War and the immediate years that followed. She mentions the family values of her parents and the general attitude of people in Murray during the depression years. She further discusses recreational activities during her childhood and teenage years, public education in the 1930s and public utilities available during 1940s in Calloway County, Kentucky. She concludes by discussing the deaths of Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy and how it affected her life.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH093
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Whayne, Joan Butterworth (part 1)
Biographical note: Joan Butterworth Whayne was born in 1925 at Bowling Green, Kentucky. Her father established the Butterworth Clinic in Murray, Kentucky. She attended the Murray Training School where she graduated at age sixteen in 1942. She began college the following fall at Murray State Teachers College. She remained at Murray State for three years but transferred to University of Kentucky. After she graduated in 1946, she spent time in Washington D.C., Memphis, New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Fort Worth. She returned to Murray where her husband worked for Whayne’s father at the Butterworth Clinic. Later in life, her husband worked as a regional medical officer in Europe, Asia and South America.
Description: Joan Butterworth Whayne describes her life experiences from the 1930s to the 1970s. She describes her childhood in Calloway County, Kentucky during the Great Depression and the Second World War. She recalls attending the Murray State Training School, social activities and regional events. She remembers her college years, extracurricular activities and career as a real estate agent. She describes her travels with her husband, who was a medic in the United States Army, during and following the Second World War. She also mentions her father being overseas during the First World War.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH129
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hart, Elizabeth R. F. (part 1)
Biographical note: Elizabeth R. F. Hart was born in Mason Memorial Hospital in Murray, Kentucky on August 30, 1922. Her parents, Mary and William Finney were both school teachers. Her father was also served as president of First National Bank and dabbled in real estate. Hart was five years when old her family moved to Florida. One year later, her family returned to Kentucky. She attended Murray Training School on the campus of Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). To support her college education, her father built a tobacco barn and farmed tobacco. The barn burned down not long after she started school and her father died soon afterwards. After graduation, Hart started teaching physics in Louisville, Kentucky at a middle school. She and her husband, who worked in the medical field, resided in several places including West Virginia, New York, North Carolina and Paducah, Kentucky. They returned to Murray to raise their three children.
Description: Elizabeth R. F. Hart recalls her childhood in Murray, Kentucky during the Great Depression era. She remembers playing in the swimming pool behind the ice factory and neighborhood children roller skating on the recently paved city streets. While attending college, Hart recalled her uncle matching whatever money she made from selling Christmas cards door to door to pay tuition. Hart mentions her father hiring a African-American woman named Ora Jackson to help with cooking, household cleaning and family care. She described how Jackson took great care of her as a child. She concludes with a discussion about her relationship and marriage with her husband Jim Hart.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH099
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hart, Elizabeth R. F. (part 2)
Biographical note: Elizabeth R. F. Hart was born in Mason Memorial Hospital in Murray, Kentucky on August 30, 1922. Her parents, Mary and William Finney were both school teachers. Her father was also served as president of First National Bank and dabbled in real estate. Hart was five years when old her family moved to Florida. One year later, her family returned to Kentucky. She attended Murray Training School on the campus of Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). To support her college education, her father built a tobacco barn and farmed tobacco. The barn burned down not long after she started school and her father died soon afterwards. After graduation, Hart started teaching physics in Louisville, Kentucky at a middle school. She and her husband, who worked in the medical field, resided in several places including West Virginia, New York, North Carolina and Paducah, Kentucky. They returned to Murray to raise their three children.
Description: Elizabeth R. F. Hart recalls her childhood in Murray, Kentucky during the Great Depression era. She remembers playing in the swimming pool behind the ice factory and neighborhood children roller skating on the recently paved city streets. While attending college, Hart recalled her uncle matching whatever money she made from selling Christmas cards door to door to pay tuition. Hart mentions her father hiring a African-American woman named Ora Jackson to help with cooking, household cleaning and family care. She described how Jackson took great care of her as a child. She concludes with a discussion about her relationship and marriage with her husband Jim Hart.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH099
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Hale, Vivian M.
Biographical note: Vivian M. Hale was a lifelong resident of Murray, Kentucky. Her mother, Ruth Skinner Hale, was a homemaker and her father, Leon Hale, worked for the Kentucky State Department. She attended local public schools and graduated from Murray High School in 1942. She later graduated from Murray State College (presently Murray State University) in 1945 with a degree in accounting and bookkeeping. After graduation, she taught briefly in Shelbyville, Illinois but returned and began work as an administrative secretary at Murray State College. She worked in the Office of the President from 1946 to 1986.
Description: Vivian M. Hale recalls her life in Murray, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1980s. She discusses the effects of the Great Depression and Prohibition Era and how she witnessed bootleggers stealing sugar from a factory down. She mentions an old cotton gin and other businesses that operated in the city. When attending Murray State College (presently Murray State University) during the Second World War, she recalled that the only men on campus were in the Navy flight program or teaching at the college. She remembered that she heard of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s death on the radio and that the community was stunned by the announcement. Hale also discussed segregation at the college prior to the 1960s and that black students had their own separate study halls and a special filing cabinet for their grades.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH105
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Rose, Doris (part 2)
Biographical note: Doris Rose was born in Murray, Kentucky in 1919. She was a lifelong resident of Murray. Her parents were Bessie Houston and Cordis Fair. Her mother graduated from Murray High School but her father only attended grade school. She attended public schools and graduated Murray High School in 1935 at age sixteen. Her first job was at a real estate company working as a typist for a $1 a day. She later worked at a local photographer’s studio for four years earning $1.50 a day. She attended the First Christian Church as a child and the First Baptist Church later in her life. She married Alan Rose in 1939. Her husband joined the Marine Corp in 1943, where he spent a year in California and another year overseas.
Description: Doris Rose discusses her childhood in Murray, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She recalls doing chores such as feeding the farm animals, churning butter, sweeping and cleaning coal lamps. Her family home had no running water or electricity. She describes local medical facilities and home remedies. She also describes the effects of the Great Depression and the impact of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal policies. During the Great Depression, Rose recalled there being few jobs, no money and her family struggling to survive in a broken economy. She also recalled families and friends gathering at the bus station during the Second World War to bid farewell to the men leaving for military service.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH135
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Rose, Doris (part 1)
Biographical note: Doris Rose was born in Murray, Kentucky in 1919. She was a lifelong resident of Murray. Her parents were Bessie Houston and Cordis Fair. Her mother graduated from Murray High School but her father only attended grade school. She attended public schools and graduated Murray High School in 1935 at age sixteen. Her first job was at a real estate company working as a typist for a $1 a day. She later worked at a local photographer’s studio for four years earning $1.50 a day. She attended the First Christian Church as a child and the First Baptist Church later in her life. She married Alan Rose in 1939. Her husband joined the Marine Corp in 1943, where he spent a year in California and another year overseas.
Description: Doris Rose discusses her childhood in Murray, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She recalls doing chores such as feeding the farm animals, churning butter, sweeping and cleaning coal lamps. Her family home had no running water or electricity. She describes local medical facilities and home remedies. She also describes the effects of the Great Depression and the impact of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal policies. During the Great Depression, Rose recalled there being few jobs, no money and her family struggling to survive in a broken economy. She also recalled families and friends gathering at the bus station during the Second World War to bid farewell to the men leaving for military service.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH135
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Dunn, Marjorie Shroat (part 1)
Biographical note: Marjorie Shroat Dunn was a lifelong resident and business woman from Murray, Kentucky. Her father owned local businesses and her mother was a homemaker. Her father owned and rented property in the city as well as selling meat products and scrap iron. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Murray. She attended local public schools and graduated Murray High School in 1940. After graduation she began to work at the Bank of Murray and attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University). In 1945, she graduated and received a degree in business administration. She first married in 1940 but her husband died of a heart attack five years later. She remarried in 1971 to Felix Dunn and nine years later he died.
Description: Marjorie Shroat Dunn discusses her experiences as child through to adulthood in Murray, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. Marjorie recalled when the city first paved the roads and how community members helped pay for the road construction. She discusses life in Murray and the many changes that took place over time. She mentions segregated schools and how many black students in the Murray attended Kentucky State University. During the Second World War, Marjorie describes increases in food prices and instances where there was no food at local stores. She also recalls the lack of young men in college due to the draft. She concludes by discussing the effects of Great Depression on the community and her father’s business.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH104
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Dunn, Marjorie Shroat (part 2)
Biographical note: Marjorie Shroat Dunn was a lifelong resident and business woman from Murray, Kentucky. Her father owned local businesses and her mother was a homemaker. Her father owned and rented property in the city as well as selling meat products and scrap iron. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Murray. She attended local public schools and graduated Murray High School in 1940. After graduation she began to work at the Bank of Murray and attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University). In 1945, she graduated and received a degree in business administration. She first married in 1940 but her husband died of a heart attack five years later. She remarried in 1971 to Felix Dunn and nine years later he died.
Description: Marjorie Shroat Dunn discusses her experiences as child through to adulthood in Murray, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. Marjorie recalled when the city first paved the roads and how community members helped pay for the road construction. She discusses life in Murray and the many changes that took place over time. She mentions segregated schools and how many black students in the Murray attended Kentucky State University. During the Second World War, Marjorie describes increases in food prices and instances where there was no food at local stores. She also recalls the lack of young men in college due to the draft. She concludes by discussing the effects of Great Depression on the community and her father’s business.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH104
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Baker, Elizabeth Jane (part 1)
Biographical note: Jane Baker was born on December 2, 1922 at Murray, Kentucky. She was a lifetime resident of Murray, except for a few years during the Second World War when she lived at several military bases with her husband. Her mother, Gladys Hail (born 1900), grew up in the Kirksey area of Calloway County, Kentucky. Her father, Charlie Hail (born 1893), worked at the Scott & Lester Hardware Company located on the Court Square in Murray. She graduated Murray High School in June of 1941 and married in October of the same year. In early 1942, her husband was drafted into the United States Army and sent to Colorado and then to Washington D.C. where he worked at the Pentagon. Baker followed her husband on his tours of duty and after the war’s conclusion returned to Murray.
Description: Jane Baker describes her life in a small college town in western Kentucky during the Great Depression and the Second World War. She discusses childhood activities, adolescent chores and responsibilities, attending high school, working with her father at the hardware store, food distribution and healthcare, and significant events that occurred in Murray and Calloway County, Kentucky. She spoke of how everyone in town had their own gardens and shared food with neighbors. She also mentioned her family history, her experiences during the Second World War as the wife of an American soldier and offered detailed descriptions of her family home in Murray.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH092
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Baker, Elizabeth Jane (part 2)
Biographical note: Jane Baker was born on December 2, 1922 at Murray, Kentucky. She was a lifetime resident of Murray, except for a few years during the Second World War when she lived at several military bases with her husband. Her mother, Gladys Hail (born 1900), grew up in the Kirksey area of Calloway County, Kentucky. Her father, Charlie Hail (born 1893), worked at the Scott & Lester Hardware Company located on the Court Square in Murray. She graduated Murray High School in June of 1941 and married in October of the same year. In early 1942, her husband was drafted into the United States Army and sent to Colorado and then to Washington D.C. where he worked at the Pentagon. Baker followed her husband on his tours of duty and after the war’s conclusion returned to Murray.
Description: Jane Baker describes her life in a small college town in western Kentucky during the Great Depression and the Second World War. She discusses childhood activities, adolescent chores and responsibilities, attending high school, working with her father at the hardware store, food distribution and healthcare, and significant events that occurred in Murray and Calloway County, Kentucky. She spoke of how everyone in town had their own gardens and shared food with neighbors. She also mentioned her family history, her experiences during the Second World War as the wife of an American soldier and offered detailed descriptions of her family home in Murray.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH092
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Wolfson, Emily Wilson (part 1)
Biographical note: Emily Wilson Wolfson was born at Wilson Station, Kentucky in 1915. As a child, she attended a one-room school house in Henderson County, Kentucky. Her father was a poultry farmer and an insurance agent and her mother a public school teacher. She received a scholarship at the Newcomb School of Art in Louisiana, where she received an undergraduate degree in Art. She later attended the Art School at Louisiana State University. After receiving her master’s degree in 1941, she was hired as an art instructor at Murray State Teachers College. She taught at Murray State for three years before accepting a position as the Art Director at the Evansville Art Museum. She also taught at Indiana University for ten years. She returned to Murray State in 1958 as faculty member in the Art Department. She retired in 1967. She was a member of the Murray Art Guild, the president of the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen and a representative on the American Crafts Council. She was awarded the Governor’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts and the Rude Osolnik Award.
Description: Emily Wilson Wolfson, a native of Henderson County, Kentucky, discusses her experiences on a poultry farm during the 1920s. During the Great Depression, her father sold the family farm and ventured into business of insurance while her mother taught in public schools. She describes high school, church events and social activities in rural western Kentucky during the 1930s and 1940s. She mentions her academic career at Murray State University and Indiana University during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s and her career as an artist in the 1970s and 1980s.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 October 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH130
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Wolfson, Emily Wilson (part 2)
Biographical note: Emily Wilson Wolfson was born at Wilson Station, Kentucky in 1915. As a child, she attended a one-room school house in Henderson County, Kentucky. Her father was a poultry farmer and an insurance agent and her mother a public school teacher. She received a scholarship at the Newcomb School of Art in Louisiana, where she received an undergraduate degree in Art. She later attended the Art School at Louisiana State University. After receiving her master’s degree in 1941, she was hired as an art instructor at Murray State Teachers College. She taught at Murray State for three years before accepting a position as the Art Director at the Evansville Art Museum. She also taught at Indiana University for ten years. She returned to Murray State in 1958 as faculty member in the Art Department. She retired in 1967. She was a member of the Murray Art Guild, the president of the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen and a representative on the American Crafts Council. She was awarded the Governor’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts and the Rude Osolnik Award.
Description: Emily Wilson Wolfson, a native of Henderson County, Kentucky, discusses her experiences on a poultry farm during the 1920s. During the Great Depression, her father sold the family farm and ventured into business of insurance while her mother taught in public schools. She describes high school, church events and social activities in rural western Kentucky during the 1930s and 1940s. She mentions her academic career at Murray State University and Indiana University during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s and her career as an artist in the 1970s and 1980s.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 October 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH130
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Boyd, Oneida (part 2)
Biographical note: Oneida Boyd was a lifelong resident of Murray, Kentucky. She was baptized at Locust Grove Baptist Church but later attended the First Baptist Church of Murray. She graduated from Murray Training School and briefly attended Murray State College. Prior to the Second World War, she worked at Boones Laundry and Dry Cleaners in Murray. During the war, she worked for Western Union delivering telegrams. Following the war, she became manager of Western Union and continued to work there until the office closed. After that, she worked for the Bank of Murray until her retirement in 1978.
Description: Oneida Boyd describes life in Murray, Kentucky during the Great Depression and the Second World War. She discusses that many homes in Calloway County, prior to the construction of the Kentucky Dam in the 1940s, had no electricity. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Murray and community organizations. Oneida discusses difficult economic times; the struggles of the working class, the introduction of social security and local and national politics. She mentioned the effects of the depression on her family and community. Oneida recalled hearing President Roosevelt’s Sunday morning radio chats and the announcement of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. She described her job at Western Union during the Second World War when she delivered telegrams to families of recently deceased soldiers. She also recalled a visit to Murray by President Truman.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 October 26 & 1988 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH096
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Boyd, Oneida (part 1)
Biographical note: Oneida Boyd was a lifelong resident of Murray, Kentucky. She was baptized at Locust Grove Baptist Church but later attended the First Baptist Church of Murray. She graduated from Murray Training School and briefly attended Murray State College. Prior to the Second World War, she worked at Boones Laundry and Dry Cleaners in Murray. During the war, she worked for Western Union delivering telegrams. Following the war, she became manager of Western Union and continued to work there until the office closed. After that, she worked for the Bank of Murray until her retirement in 1978.
Description: Oneida Boyd describes life in Murray, Kentucky during the Great Depression and the Second World War. She discusses that many homes in Calloway County, prior to the construction of the Kentucky Dam in the 1940s, had no electricity. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Murray and community organizations. Oneida discusses difficult economic times; the struggles of the working class, the introduction of social security and local and national politics. She mentioned the effects of the depression on her family and community. Oneida recalled hearing President Roosevelt’s Sunday morning radio chats and the announcement of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. She described her job at Western Union during the Second World War when she delivered telegrams to families of recently deceased soldiers. She also recalled a visit to Murray by President Truman.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 October 26 & 1988 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH096
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Allbritten, Neva Grey (part 2)
Biographical note: Neva Grey Allbritten was native of Murray, Kentucky. Her mother was originally from Tennessee and her father from Kentucky. As a child, she helped her father at his store and later sold vending and cigarette machines. She graduated valedictorian at Murray High School and received an academic scholarship to attend Murray State Teachers College. She attended college briefly, but dropped out because of health issues. She was a member of the First Christian Church of Murray, where she taught bible school, played piano and sang in the church choir. Allbritten sold war bonds at the City Bank during the Second World War. In her later years she was involved with the Women’s Club and served as president of the club from 1961 to 1962.
Description: Neva Grey Allbritten describes life in Murray, Kentucky during the early half of the 20th century. She describes attending school and church, working at her father’s store, attending social and community activities and events during her childhood and young adulthood. She discusses her family history, as well as detailed descriptions of her home and family life in Murray. She mentions that Murray was originally named Spring Hill due to all the natural springs in the area which she claimed attracted people to the area. As a young child, she remembered roller skating around the newly paved court house square and attending plays and musicals. She also recalled witnessing a touring circus downtown.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 October 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH091
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Allbritten, Neva Grey (part 1)
Biographical note: Neva Grey Allbritten was native of Murray, Kentucky. Her mother was originally from Tennessee and her father from Kentucky. As a child, she helped her father at his store and later sold vending and cigarette machines. She graduated valedictorian at Murray High School and received an academic scholarship to attend Murray State Teachers College. She attended college briefly, but dropped out because of health issues. She was a member of the First Christian Church of Murray, where she taught bible school, played piano and sang in the church choir. Allbritten sold war bonds at the City Bank during the Second World War. In her later years she was involved with the Women’s Club and served as president of the club from 1961 to 1962.
Description: Neva Grey Allbritten describes life in Murray, Kentucky during the early half of the 20th century. She describes attending school and church, working at her father’s store, attending social and community activities and events during her childhood and young adulthood. She discusses her family history, as well as detailed descriptions of her home and family life in Murray. She mentions that Murray was originally named Spring Hill due to all the natural springs in the area which she claimed attracted people to the area. As a young child, she remembered roller skating around the newly paved court house square and attending plays and musicals. She also recalled witnessing a touring circus downtown.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1988 October 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH091
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Outland, Kathleen C. (part 1)
Biographical note: Kathleen C. Outland was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on October 31, 1918. Her father was William Clifton Caldwell. He was a farmer that grew tobacco, corn and wheat. In his later years, he worked for the Kentucky State Highway Department. Her mother, Rachel Kelso attended grade school in Calloway County and was a member of the Beach Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church. She attended the Broach School of Calloway County until the school burned down. She graduated from Lynn Grove High School in 1936 at the age of seventeen. She received a scholarship to attend business school at Paducah, but her education was cut short by the flood of 1937. In the fall of 1937, she moved to Detroit, Michigan to work for the department store of Crown & Miller. In July of 1938, she returned to Kentucky and worked for the United States Department of Agriculture. She married Joseph Purdon in 1940, he was a tobacco auctioneer.
Description: Kathleen C. Outland recalls her youth in Calloway County, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She describes “tramps” visiting her parent’s farm looking for food and a place to sleep during the Great Depression. She discusses how she spent her days as a young child and her early education. She remembers that on ‘Trade Day’ she and her friends skipped school to catch the event. She reflects upon her life involvement with church and her professional career. She mentions that her church would host all day revival meetings called “dinner on the ground” where they had a community dinner and sang gospel songs. She states that during the Great Depression there was plenty of food from the family farm, but that the family had no money. She expresses her thoughts on Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman and recalls listening to President Roosevelt’s fireside chats. Outland recalled President Truman visiting Kentucky when the dam was being constructed at Gilbertsville. She also spoke of how farms were taken by imminent domain before the dam was built.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1989 February 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH118
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Lifestyles - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Outland, Kathleen C. (part 2)
Biographical note: Kathleen C. Outland was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on October 31, 1918. Her father was William Clifton Caldwell. He was a farmer that grew tobacco, corn and wheat. In his later years, he worked for the Kentucky State Highway Department. Her mother, Rachel Kelso attended grade school in Calloway County and was a member of the Beach Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church. She attended the Broach School of Calloway County until the school burned down. She graduated from Lynn Grove High School in 1936 at the age of seventeen. She received a scholarship to attend business school at Paducah, but her education was cut short by the flood of 1937. In the fall of 1937, she moved to Detroit, Michigan to work for the department store of Crown & Miller. In July of 1938, she returned to Kentucky and worked for the United States Department of Agriculture. She married Joseph Purdon in 1940, he was a tobacco auctioneer.
Description: Kathleen C. Outland recalls her youth in Calloway County, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. She describes “tramps” visiting her parent’s farm looking for food and a place to sleep during the Great Depression. She discusses how she spent her days as a young child and her early education. She remembers that on ‘Trade Day’ she and her friends skipped school to catch the event. She reflects upon her life involvement with church and her professional career. She mentions that her church would host all day revival meetings called “dinner on the ground” where they had a community dinner and sang gospel songs. She states that during the Great Depression there was plenty of food from the family farm, but that the family had no money. She expresses her thoughts on Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman and recalls listening to President Roosevelt’s fireside chats. Outland recalled President Truman visiting Kentucky when the dam was being constructed at Gilbertsville. She also spoke of how farms were taken by imminent domain before the dam was built.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Anderson, Margaret R.
Date of interview: 1989 February 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH118
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Forrest C. Pogue discusses, in a phone interview, his childhood and early adulthood in Lyon County, Kentucky and his years attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). He offers a family history, early impressions of the Murray State campus and experiences at other academic institutions. Pogue also discusses his close ties with Murray State and the impact it had upon his life.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Beasley, Wayne
Date of interview: 1991 February 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Forrest C. Pogue - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pogue, Forrest C. (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Forrest C. Pogue was born on September 17, 1912, in Crittenden County, Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Murray State Teachers College in 1931, his Masters from the University of Kentucky in 1932 and his doctorate from Clark University in 1936. From 1937 to 1938, he studied at the University of Paris, France. Upon his return to the United States, he taught at Western Kentucky College and later at Murray State Teachers College. He was drafted in 1942 into the United States Army and in spring of 1943 was transferred to the Historical Division of the War Department. In 1944, he landed with the American troops at Normandy, France. He conducted interviews with the soldiers and officers until the war’s conclusion. After the war, he served as a civilian historian for the Department of the Army from 1945 to 1952. He briefly returned to teaching at Murray State College in 1954 and 1955. The following year he became the director of the newly established George C. Marshall Research Foundation. In 1974 he became the Director of the Eisenhower Institute for Historical Research at the Smithsonian and held that position until his retirement. He is best remembered for his four volume biography of George C. Marshall and published works on the European theater of the Second World War. He died on October 6, 1996 at Murray, Kentucky.
Description: Forrest C. Pogue discusses, in a phone interview, his childhood and early adulthood in Lyon County, Kentucky and his years attending and teaching at Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). He offers a family history, early impressions of the Murray State campus and experiences at other academic institutions. Pogue also discusses his close ties with Murray State and the impact it had upon his life.
Descriptors: Oral history.
Interviewed by: Beasley, Wayne
Date of interview: 1991 February 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH189
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 2 part 1)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 1 part 2)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 1 part 1)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 2 part 2)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hall, Charles Harvey (part 2)
Biographical note: Charles Harvey Hall was born in Calvert City, Kentucky on July 12, 1917. He graduated from Chillicothe Business College and Paducah Junior College. He also attended the University of Louisville and Murray State College. Hall worked for George Jessup as his personal secretary and later executive assistant on the Kentucky Dam Project from 1938 to 1944. In 1945 he founded a wholesale electronics business in Paducah, which he sold in 1952. Charles Hall worked for the Channel Master Corporation from 1956 until 1976 when he returned to Calvert City to become president of the Calvert City Bank. In 1983, he retired and began volunteer work with the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE), including two years at their office in Washington, D.C. He died on August 1, 2010.
Description: Charles Harvey Hall served as the personal secretary and later executive assistant project manager, George Jessup, of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) during the Kentucky Dam Project from 1938 to 1944. The first interview, conducted on December 29, 1994, he discusses his duties as secretary, experiences working in the TVA offices and the managers in charge of the Kentucky Dam project. He describes topics such as the “Safety Men”, accidents and fatalities, racial relations, employee relations, Kentucky Dam Village and the dam’s involvement in the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. The second interview, conducted on October 5, 1995 focuses primarily on the conditions of Marshal County, Kentucky in the decade before the Kentucky Dam Project began, as well as the security measures in place during the presidential visit of President Harry S. Truman in 1945.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1994 December 29 and 1995 October 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH202
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hall, Charles Harvey (part 3)
Biographical note: Charles Harvey Hall was born in Calvert City, Kentucky on July 12, 1917. He graduated from Chillicothe Business College and Paducah Junior College. He also attended the University of Louisville and Murray State College. Hall worked for George Jessup as his personal secretary and later executive assistant on the Kentucky Dam Project from 1938 to 1944. In 1945 he founded a wholesale electronics business in Paducah, which he sold in 1952. Charles Hall worked for the Channel Master Corporation from 1956 until 1976 when he returned to Calvert City to become president of the Calvert City Bank. In 1983, he retired and began volunteer work with the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE), including two years at their office in Washington, D.C. He died on August 1, 2010.
Description: Charles Harvey Hall served as the personal secretary and later executive assistant project manager, George Jessup, of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) during the Kentucky Dam Project from 1938 to 1944. The first interview, conducted on December 29, 1994, he discusses his duties as secretary, experiences working in the TVA offices and the managers in charge of the Kentucky Dam project. He describes topics such as the “Safety Men”, accidents and fatalities, racial relations, employee relations, Kentucky Dam Village and the dam’s involvement in the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. The second interview, conducted on October 5, 1995 focuses primarily on the conditions of Marshal County, Kentucky in the decade before the Kentucky Dam Project began, as well as the security measures in place during the presidential visit of President Harry S. Truman in 1945.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1994 December 29 and 1995 October 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH202
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hall, Charles Harvey (part 1)
Biographical note: Charles Harvey Hall was born in Calvert City, Kentucky on July 12, 1917. He graduated from Chillicothe Business College and Paducah Junior College. He also attended the University of Louisville and Murray State College. Hall worked for George Jessup as his personal secretary and later executive assistant on the Kentucky Dam Project from 1938 to 1944. In 1945 he founded a wholesale electronics business in Paducah, which he sold in 1952. Charles Hall worked for the Channel Master Corporation from 1956 until 1976 when he returned to Calvert City to become president of the Calvert City Bank. In 1983, he retired and began volunteer work with the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE), including two years at their office in Washington, D.C. He died on August 1, 2010.
Description: Charles Harvey Hall served as the personal secretary and later executive assistant project manager, George Jessup, of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) during the Kentucky Dam Project from 1938 to 1944. The first interview, conducted on December 29, 1994, he discusses his duties as secretary, experiences working in the TVA offices and the managers in charge of the Kentucky Dam project. He describes topics such as the “Safety Men”, accidents and fatalities, racial relations, employee relations, Kentucky Dam Village and the dam’s involvement in the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. The second interview, conducted on October 5, 1995 focuses primarily on the conditions of Marshal County, Kentucky in the decade before the Kentucky Dam Project began, as well as the security measures in place during the presidential visit of President Harry S. Truman in 1945.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1994 December 29 and 1995 October 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH202
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Brooks, Baisel and Courtney
Biographical note: Baisel and Courtney Brooks were residents of the Kentucky Dam Village in Marshall County, Kentucky from 1944 to 1945. Baisel was one of the first employees to work at the dam after its completion. He retired from the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Kentucky Dam in 1975.
Description: Baisel and Courtney Brooks discuss the history and impact of Kentucky Dam on western Kentucky. The interview begins with a biographical outline consisting of their relocation to Western Kentucky in 1944 and their job responsibilities at the dam. Baisel discussed working conditions during construction and the impact the Kentucky Dam and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) had on the region. Included in the conversation was river trade and traffic, Murray State College (presently Murray State University), the creation of Land Between the Lake during the 1960s and the proposed purchase of the dam by the Ford Motor Corporation. The interview concludes with an explanation defining the purpose of the Kentucky Dam Village Oral History Project.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1994 December 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH192
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Derington, William “Bill” (part 2)
Biographical note: William “Bill” Derington was born in northern Marshall County, Kentucky. Beginning in 1937, he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the State of Oregon. In 1941 he was employed for six months by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a laborer during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He relocated to Detroit, Michigan to work for Briggs and Stratton when the Second World War began. From the summer of 1945 until the fall of 1946, he traveled between Detroit and Marshall County working at both Briggs and Stratton and the Kentucky Dam. After October of 1946, he remained permanently in Marshall County.
Description: William “Bill” Derington of Marshall County, Kentucky discusses his experiences as a laborer during the construction of Kentucky Dam and working in Detroit, Michigan during the Second World War. He describes working conditions and the impact of labor unions in both Kentucky and Michigan. He recalled the many changes brought to Marshall County, Kentucky when the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began construction of the dam and after its completion. He recounts safety issues, race relations, hiring practices, alcohol consumption in the camps and work related injuries.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Derington, William “Bill”
Date of interview: 1994 October 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH195
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Derington, William “Bill” (part 1)
Biographical note: William “Bill” Derington was born in northern Marshall County, Kentucky. Beginning in 1937, he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the State of Oregon. In 1941 he was employed for six months by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a laborer during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He relocated to Detroit, Michigan to work for Briggs and Stratton when the Second World War began. From the summer of 1945 until the fall of 1946, he traveled between Detroit and Marshall County working at both Briggs and Stratton and the Kentucky Dam. After October of 1946, he remained permanently in Marshall County.
Description: William “Bill” Derington of Marshall County, Kentucky discusses his experiences as a laborer during the construction of Kentucky Dam and working in Detroit, Michigan during the Second World War. He describes working conditions and the impact of labor unions in both Kentucky and Michigan. He recalled the many changes brought to Marshall County, Kentucky when the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began construction of the dam and after its completion. He recounts safety issues, race relations, hiring practices, alcohol consumption in the camps and work related injuries.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Derington, William “Bill”
Date of interview: 1994 October 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH195
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Crockett, Paul (part 1)
Biographical note: Paul Crockett was born October 11, 1910 near Big Sandy, Tennessee. He attended Big Sandy High School and Austin Peay College (now Austin Peay University), worked for Bethel College and briefly as a high school teacher. In 1940, he applied for a position with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a Public Safety Officer and on April 14, 1941 was offered a job at Watts Bar, Tennessee. In 1944 he was transferred to Great Falls Dam at Rock Island, Tennessee and in October of 1945 to Kentucky Dam. He lived and worked at the Kentucky Dam Village prior to its creation as a campground. He achieved the rank of Area Security Chief prior to his retirement in 1975.
Description: Paul Crockett details his employment as a security guard and safety officer with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and describes the final phase of construction of the Kentucky Dam in 1945. He explains why he sought employment with the TVA in 1940 and the qualifications which were required to manage the facility’s security. He recalls the day-to-day operations he witnessed during construction and discusses issues such as theft, drinking on the job and the sometimes tense relationship between laborer and management. He further describes Kentucky Dam Village and the daily experiences of the residents in the community. The interview ends with a commentary on the dedication of the Kentucky Dam by President Harry S. Truman in 1945.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Unknown.
Date of interview: 1995 April 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH193
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Crockett, Paul (part 2)
Biographical note: Paul Crockett was born October 11, 1910 near Big Sandy, Tennessee. He attended Big Sandy High School and Austin Peay College (now Austin Peay University), worked for Bethel College and briefly as a high school teacher. In 1940, he applied for a position with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a Public Safety Officer and on April 14, 1941 was offered a job at Watts Bar, Tennessee. In 1944 he was transferred to Great Falls Dam at Rock Island, Tennessee and in October of 1945 to Kentucky Dam. He lived and worked at the Kentucky Dam Village prior to its creation as a campground. He achieved the rank of Area Security Chief prior to his retirement in 1975.
Description: Paul Crockett details his employment as a security guard and safety officer with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and describes the final phase of construction of the Kentucky Dam in 1945. He explains why he sought employment with the TVA in 1940 and the qualifications which were required to manage the facility’s security. He recalls the day-to-day operations he witnessed during construction and discusses issues such as theft, drinking on the job and the sometimes tense relationship between laborer and management. He further describes Kentucky Dam Village and the daily experiences of the residents in the community. The interview ends with a commentary on the dedication of the Kentucky Dam by President Harry S. Truman in 1945.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Unknown.
Date of interview: 1995 April 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH193
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Martin, Travis
Biographical note: Travis Martin was born about 1913. She began work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1939. She worked at the Land Acquisition office for the Kentucky Dam in Paris, Tennessee. Following the Second World War, she was transferred to Gilbertsville, Kentucky and lived in the Kentucky Dam Village.
Description: Travis Martin discusses her experiences working with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the construction of the Kentucky Dam. She outlines her duties working with land acquisition for the Kentucky Dam and describes her life at the Kentucky Dam Village. Topics covered in the interview include racial relations, recreation, public safety and the dam’s dedication by President Harry S. Truman.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Conner, Dorisanna
Date of interview: 1995 April 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH209
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Derington, William L.
Biographical note: William L. Derington was born in 1947 in Palma, Marshall County, Kentucky. His father, William “Bill” Derinton was a construction worker on the Kentucky Dam during the 1940s. He enlisted in the United States Marines during the Vietnam War in August 1967 and was took part in the Tet Offensive of 1968. After he was discharged he returned to Marshall County. Since 1987, he has been employed by the Facilities Management Department of Murray State University.
Description: William L. Derington discusses the changes that took place within Marshall County, Kentucky in the years following the construction of Kentucky Dam. He discusses the social and environmental changes of the county in the years after the dam’s completion and the influx of chemical factories and other industry into the region. The interview concludes with his opinions on the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and labor unions
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Derington, William L.
Date of interview: 1995 December 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH196
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Irvan, Daniel W.
Biographical note: Daniel W. Irvan was born on September 12, 1919 in Hardin, Marshall County, Kentucky. He farmed until 1941 when he began to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam project. Irvan continued to work for the TVA until he was drafted into the Army on January 18, 1943. After being discharged he returned to farming on a small scale while also working at a plant in Calvert City. He retired in 1980 and died on May 14, 2003.
Description: Daniel W. Irvan describes the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kentucky Dam project and its impact on Marshall County, Kentucky. He describes farm life and economic conditions in Marshall County prior to the construction of Kentucky Dam. He explains the hiring process performed by the TVA, the duties he was assigned and work conditions on the jobsite. The interview concludes with an examination of the economic impact of the project on Marshall County and the surrounding area.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, Tim
Date of interview: 1995 December 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH205
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Jessup, George P., Jr.
Biographical note: George P. Jessup, Jr. was the son of noted dam engineer George P. Jessup. He was born on November 13, 1923 at Iron Mountain, Michigan. When his father began to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) around 1935, the family moved to the Wheeler Dam site in Alabama and later to Paducah, Kentucky. While in Paducah he attended Paducah Tilghman High School. After the Kentucky Dam was completed the family returned to his father’s home in Ithaca, New York. There George Jessup Jr. attended Cornell University. He died on October 8, 2005.
Description: George P. Jessup, Jr. describes his father’s, George P. Jessup, Sr., involvement with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of Kentucky Dam from 1938 to 1944. He provides a biographical sketch of his father’s life prior to working for the TVA and details his father’s employment on the Kentucky Dam. He also mentions his father’s interactions with TVA engineers and other employees. Jessup concludes with recollections on his father’s opinions on labor unions, racial relations, supervision of employees and the hierarchical structure adhered to by the TVA.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH207
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Phillips, Mary & Joe (Part 1)
Biographical note: Mary Broadfoot Phillips was the daughter of the Hollis Broadfoot was the construction engineer of the Kentucky Dam project managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority. She was born on July 17, 1923 at Florence, Alabama. She arrived with her parents at Kentucky Dam Village in the summer of 1939. After the dam’s completion, her father became project manager of the dam and was influential in constructing the road over the dam and the addition of another electric generator. She graduated from Benton High School and attended Murray State Teachers College from 1943 to 1944. She married in 1945 and moved to Benton, Kentucky. She died at Benton on September 6, 2013. Joe Brooks Phillips was born in Marshall County in 1921. He attended local public schools and graduated from Benton High School. He served in the United States Marine Corps during the Second World War. He owned and operated the Phillips Chevrolet in Benton. He died on October 27, 2001 at Benton.
Description: Mary Broadfoot Phillips recalls her father’s activities during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from 1939 to the early 1950s. She describes living at Kentucky Dam Village from 1940 to 1945. She remembers the community being very close and that many had resided at other Tennessee Valley Authority built villages elsewhere. She recollected temporary housing in 1939 being brought up by barge from other TVA construction sites and the later building of permanent houses. She mentioned social events and activities, the effects of the Second World War, segregation and race relations and the many forgotten families which resided in the Village. Joe Brooks Phillips referred to his experiences living in Benton and Marshall County before the dam was constructed. He recollected that the communities in the region did not have electricity or indoor plumbing prior to the completion of the dam.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH217
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Phillips, Mary & Joe (Part 2)
Biographical note: Mary Broadfoot Phillips was the daughter of the Hollis Broadfoot was the construction engineer of the Kentucky Dam project managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority. She was born on July 17, 1923 at Florence, Alabama. She arrived with her parents at Kentucky Dam Village in the summer of 1939. After the dam’s completion, her father became project manager of the dam and was influential in constructing the road over the dam and the addition of another electric generator. She graduated from Benton High School and attended Murray State Teachers College from 1943 to 1944. She married in 1945 and moved to Benton, Kentucky. She died at Benton on September 6, 2013. Joe Brooks Phillips was born in Marshall County in 1921. He attended local public schools and graduated from Benton High School. He served in the United States Marine Corps during the Second World War. He owned and operated the Phillips Chevrolet in Benton. He died on October 27, 2001 at Benton.
Description: Mary Broadfoot Phillips recalls her father’s activities during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from 1939 to the early 1950s. She describes living at Kentucky Dam Village from 1940 to 1945. She remembers the community being very close and that many had resided at other Tennessee Valley Authority built villages elsewhere. She recollected temporary housing in 1939 being brought up by barge from other TVA construction sites and the later building of permanent houses. She mentioned social events and activities, the effects of the Second World War, segregation and race relations and the many forgotten families which resided in the Village. Joe Brooks Phillips referred to his experiences living in Benton and Marshall County before the dam was constructed. He recollected that the communities in the region did not have electricity or indoor plumbing prior to the completion of the dam.
Descriptors: Jackson Purchase (Ky.) -- Social life and customs.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH217
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Washam, Barbara
Biographical note: Barbara Evelyn Moore Washam worked for the Tennessee Valley Authority in the commissary at Kentucky Dam Village from 1942 to 1945. She arrived in Paducah from Nashville in 1940. She later worked as a bookkeeper at her husband’s optometrist office in Mayfield. She died on January 14, 2011 in Paducah.
Description: Barbara Evelyn Moore Washam discusses her experiences working for the Tennessee Valley Authority in the commissary at Kentucky Dam Village during the 1940’s. She vividly describes the people, social events and community facilities of the village. She recalled living in the dormitories, rationing during the Second World War, recreational activities, entertainment, segregation, company managed stores, race relations and segregation in Paducah.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH225
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Washam, Barbara
Biographical note: Barbara Evelyn Moore Washam worked for the Tennessee Valley Authority in the commissary at Kentucky Dam Village from 1942 to 1945. She arrived in Paducah from Nashville in 1940. She later worked as a bookkeeper at her husband’s optometrist office in Mayfield. She died on January 14, 2011 in Paducah.
Description: Barbara Evelyn Moore Washam discusses her experiences working for the Tennessee Valley Authority in the commissary at Kentucky Dam Village during the 1940’s. She vividly describes the people, social events and community facilities of the village. She recalled living in the dormitories, rationing during the Second World War, recreational activities, entertainment, segregation, company managed stores, race relations and segregation in Paducah.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH225
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Peek, Kenneth (Part 1)
Biographical note: Kenneth Peek was born and raised in Milan, Tennessee. Prior to being employed by the Tennessee Valley Authority he resided in McKenzie, Tennessee. He was employed by the TVA and relocated to the Kentucky Dam Village in 1941. He was drafted into the United States Navy in the latter part of the Second World War. He served overseas in the Pacific Theater. Peek returned to his position as security officer in 1946. In 1969, he left the Village to work at the TVA’s branch office in Paris, Tennessee. He retired in 1981.
Description: Kenneth Peek discusses his experiences as a security guard for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam and afterwards as a public safety officer at the Kentucky Dam Village. He described his training as a public safety officer and fire prevention agent in the Village from the 1940s to the 1960s. During the Second World War, he recalled being taught to spot, identify and report aircraft flying over the dam. He recounts that the Village was divided by sex and race, the “white village” and the “colored village.” He described the dormitories, private residences and recreation and community buildings. Peek also mentioned race relations, the impact of the war on construction and security, minor problems with drunk driving and public drunkenness, the unionization of workers, women guards serving during the war years and other TVA projects related to the dam and the Village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH216
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Peek, Kenneth (Part 2)
Biographical note: Kenneth Peek was born and raised in Milan, Tennessee. Prior to being employed by the Tennessee Valley Authority he resided in McKenzie, Tennessee. He was employed by the TVA and relocated to the Kentucky Dam Village in 1941. He was drafted into the United States Navy in the latter part of the Second World War. He served overseas in the Pacific Theater. Peek returned to his position as security officer in 1946. In 1969, he left the Village to work at the TVA’s branch office in Paris, Tennessee. He retired in 1981.
Description: Kenneth Peek discusses his experiences as a security guard for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam and afterwards as a public safety officer at the Kentucky Dam Village. He described his training as a public safety officer and fire prevention agent in the Village from the 1940s to the 1960s. During the Second World War, he recalled being taught to spot, identify and report aircraft flying over the dam. He recounts that the Village was divided by sex and race, the “white village” and the “colored village.” He described the dormitories, private residences and recreation and community buildings. Peek also mentioned race relations, the impact of the war on construction and security, minor problems with drunk driving and public drunkenness, the unionization of workers, women guards serving during the war years and other TVA projects related to the dam and the Village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 January 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH216
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: O’Dell, Edward (Part 1)
Biographical note: Edward O’Dell was born at Calvert City on September 11, 1918. He attended local public schools and graduated from Calvert City High School. He briefly attended Murray State Teachers College for a few years before he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the summer of 1938 during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He worked at the mill in Calvert City and as a laborer with the county highway department before working on the dam. He worked as a laborer and warehouse supervisor for the TVA until he left for military service in late 1943.
Description: Edward O’Dell describes working for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He discussed his early years of living in Calvert City and Marshall County, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. He recollected working as a laborer in the strawberry fields, the mill in Calvert City, aboard a steamboat and for the county highway department. He detailed his daily duties as a laborer and warehouse supervisor. He mentions alcohol being consumed on the job, the theft of government property by employees, problems between laborers and iron workers, interactions between labor and management, race relations, industrial accidents and social events at Kentucky Dam Village. He concluded by highlighting the many positive changes that occurred in the region following the completion of the dam.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Meyer, Jeff
Date of interview: 1995 June 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH215
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: O’Dell, Edward (Part 2)
Biographical note: Edward O’Dell was born at Calvert City on September 11, 1918. He attended local public schools and graduated from Calvert City High School. He briefly attended Murray State Teachers College for a few years before he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the summer of 1938 during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He worked at the mill in Calvert City and as a laborer with the county highway department before working on the dam. He worked as a laborer and warehouse supervisor for the TVA until he left for military service in late 1943.
Description: Edward O’Dell describes working for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He discussed his early years of living in Calvert City and Marshall County, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s. He recollected working as a laborer in the strawberry fields, the mill in Calvert City, aboard a steamboat and for the county highway department. He detailed his daily duties as a laborer and warehouse supervisor. He mentions alcohol being consumed on the job, the theft of government property by employees, problems between laborers and iron workers, interactions between labor and management, race relations, industrial accidents and social events at Kentucky Dam Village. He concluded by highlighting the many positive changes that occurred in the region following the completion of the dam.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Meyer, Jeff
Date of interview: 1995 June 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH215
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Jarvis, Victor
Biographical note: Victor Jarvis was born in Symsonia, Graves County, Kentucky on March 25, 1916. In July of 1939 he began work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam Project and remained there until he was drafted into the Army in 1944. He was discharged after a training accident. Upon discharge he returned to Graves County. He died on December 14, 2004.
Description: Victor Jarvis describes the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kentucky Dam Project and its impact on Graves County, Kentucky and the surrounding area. He explains the economic conditions prior to the project and his being hired in 1939. Topics discussed in the interview included daily wages, training received, employee and racial relations, turnover rate and injuries and fatalities during construction. The interview concludes with Jarvis recounting his short time in the military and return to Graves County.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Conner, Dorena
Date of interview: 1995 March 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH206
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Evans, Mayme (part 1)
Biographical note: Mayme Evans was born in 1920 in New Columbia, Massac County, Illinois. In 1939 she began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of Kentucky Dam in the accounting office. She remained in the Kentucky Dam Village until her husband was discharge from the United States Army in July of 1945. She died on May 30, 2002 in Vienna, Illinois.
Description: Mayme Evans discusses her experiences working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. She describes the hiring process and her responsibilities working in the accounting office. She recounts issues such as office interactions, employee turn-over rates, moonlighting and safety issues. The second half of the interview examines her experiences residing in the Kentucky Dam Village during the early 1940s. She recalls the daily life of the workers, racial interactions, social gatherings and extra-curricular activities during her residence in the village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Unknown.
Date of interview: 1995 May 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH198
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Evans, Mayme (part 2)
Biographical note: Mayme Evans was born in 1920 in New Columbia, Massac County, Illinois. In 1939 she began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of Kentucky Dam in the accounting office. She remained in the Kentucky Dam Village until her husband was discharge from the United States Army in July of 1945. She died on May 30, 2002 in Vienna, Illinois.
Description: Mayme Evans discusses her experiences working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. She describes the hiring process and her responsibilities working in the accounting office. She recounts issues such as office interactions, employee turn-over rates, moonlighting and safety issues. The second half of the interview examines her experiences residing in the Kentucky Dam Village during the early 1940s. She recalls the daily life of the workers, racial interactions, social gatherings and extra-curricular activities during her residence in the village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Unknown.
Date of interview: 1995 May 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH198
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Morrow, Robert (Series 1, Part 1)
Biographical note: Robert Morrow was born at McCracken County, Kentucky in 1916 and resided at his grandparent’s dairy farm in Lone Oak. He attended local public schools, graduated from Paducah Tilghman High School in 1933. He began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority on the Kentucky Dam in the latter part of 1939 for several months and again in the early 1940s. He was drafted into the United States Army on July 8, 1941. After the war he worked as a plumber in Paducah until his retirement.
Description: Robert Morrow describes working as an office secretary, plumbers apprentice and pipe fitter during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from 1938 to 1941. He recalled being part of the plumbers union and being paid one dollar an hour. He mentioned union activities, race relations during construction of the dam, segregated villages, safety procedures, accidents, deaths and fights among employees. Just prior to the Second World War he worked at Camp Livingston, Louisiana, where the Black Horse Squadron had been stationed, as a plumber in preparation for the war. He was drafted into the United States Army in July of 1941 but remained stateside during the entire war. He also reflects upon living in Lone Oak during the 1920s, working for the Federal Housing Project at Paducah, painting the Illinois Central Railroad Bridge across the Ohio River and the impact of the dam on the surrounding communities Alben Barkley had worked for his grandfather as a farm laborer.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1995 May 12 and 1995 November 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH213
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Morrow, Robert (Series 1, Part 2)
Biographical note: Robert Morrow was born at McCracken County, Kentucky in 1916 and resided at his grandparent’s dairy farm in Lone Oak. He attended local public schools, graduated from Paducah Tilghman High School in 1933. He began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority on the Kentucky Dam in the latter part of 1939 for several months and again in the early 1940s. He was drafted into the United States Army on July 8, 1941. After the war he worked as a plumber in Paducah until his retirement.
Description: Robert Morrow describes working as an office secretary, plumbers apprentice and pipe fitter during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from 1938 to 1941. He recalled being part of the plumbers union and being paid one dollar an hour. He mentioned union activities, race relations during construction of the dam, segregated villages, safety procedures, accidents, deaths and fights among employees. Just prior to the Second World War he worked at Camp Livingston, Louisiana, where the Black Horse Squadron had been stationed, as a plumber in preparation for the war. He was drafted into the United States Army in July of 1941 but remained stateside during the entire war. He also reflects upon living in Lone Oak during the 1920s, working for the Federal Housing Project at Paducah, painting the Illinois Central Railroad Bridge across the Ohio River and the impact of the dam on the surrounding communities Alben Barkley had worked for his grandfather as a farm laborer.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1995 May 12 and 1995 November 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH213
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Morrow, Robert (Series 2, Part 1)
Biographical note: Robert Morrow was born at McCracken County, Kentucky in 1916 and resided at his grandparent’s dairy farm in Lone Oak. He attended local public schools, graduated from Paducah Tilghman High School in 1933. He began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority on the Kentucky Dam in the latter part of 1939 for several months and again in the early 1940s. He was drafted into the United States Army on July 8, 1941. After the war he worked as a plumber in Paducah until his retirement.
Description: Robert Morrow describes working as an office secretary, plumbers apprentice and pipe fitter during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from 1938 to 1941. He recalled being part of the plumbers union and being paid one dollar an hour. He mentioned union activities, race relations during construction of the dam, segregated villages, safety procedures, accidents, deaths and fights among employees. Just prior to the Second World War he worked at Camp Livingston, Louisiana, where the Black Horse Squadron had been stationed, as a plumber in preparation for the war. He was drafted into the United States Army in July of 1941 but remained stateside during the entire war. He also reflects upon living in Lone Oak during the 1920s, working for the Federal Housing Project at Paducah, painting the Illinois Central Railroad Bridge across the Ohio River and the impact of the dam on the surrounding communities Alben Barkley had worked for his grandfather as a farm laborer.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1995 May 12 and 1995 November 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH213
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Morrow, Robert (Series 2, Part 2)
Biographical note: Robert Morrow was born at McCracken County, Kentucky in 1916 and resided at his grandparent’s dairy farm in Lone Oak. He attended local public schools, graduated from Paducah Tilghman High School in 1933. He began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority on the Kentucky Dam in the latter part of 1939 for several months and again in the early 1940s. He was drafted into the United States Army on July 8, 1941. After the war he worked as a plumber in Paducah until his retirement.
Description: Robert Morrow describes working as an office secretary, plumbers apprentice and pipe fitter during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from 1938 to 1941. He recalled being part of the plumbers union and being paid one dollar an hour. He mentioned union activities, race relations during construction of the dam, segregated villages, safety procedures, accidents, deaths and fights among employees. Just prior to the Second World War he worked at Camp Livingston, Louisiana, where the Black Horse Squadron had been stationed, as a plumber in preparation for the war. He was drafted into the United States Army in July of 1941 but remained stateside during the entire war. He also reflects upon living in Lone Oak during the 1920s, working for the Federal Housing Project at Paducah, painting the Illinois Central Railroad Bridge across the Ohio River and the impact of the dam on the surrounding communities Alben Barkley had worked for his grandfather as a farm laborer.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1995 May 12 and 1995 November 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH213
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Watkins, Sanders
Biographical note: Sanders Watkins was born at Birmingham, Kentucky on September 7, 1916. He resided at Birmingham until he was required to relocate to Briansburg due to the rising waters caused by the Kentucky Dam in 1943. He attended Murray State Teachers College on a basketball scholarship but quit after several weeks. He began to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1939 as a laborer in the lumberyard. A year later, he was assigned a position as an ironworker’s apprentice. He served three years as an apprentice before he was promoted to ironworker. In 1955, he was laid off by the TVA. The same year he was employed by the GAF Corporation from where he retired in 1981.
Description: Sanders Watkins recalls his experiences as a laborer, carpenter and iron worker for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He discussed the purchasing of property along the banks of the Tennessee River by the TVA and lack of assistance provided by the United States government to relocate the families. He describes the his experiences during Great Depression, the difficulties he had getting hired by the TVA, salary levels, former supervisors, seeing President Harry S. Truman, witnessing the first train to cross the dam, the Thanksgiving Day labor strike, segregation, race relations, accidental deaths and the effects of the dam on the region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Conner, Dorisanna
Date of interview: 1995 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH226
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Johnson, Larman
Biographical note: Larman Johnson was born in Graves County, Kentucky on April 18, 1917. As a child his family moved to Paducah and attended school at Reidland and later Hardeman School in Mayfield. He did not graduate but became a carpenter’s apprentice at Paducah. He began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority on October 2, 1939. He performed construction work at both Kentucky and Douglas Dams during the 1940s. He was laid off by the TVA just before the completion of the dam. He relocated to in Evansville, Indiana and was employed at a shipyard for fifteen years.
Description: Larman Johnson describes working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He recalls working as a laborer at the quarry at Birmingham, Kentucky and as a carpenter’s apprentice. He mentions the Great Depression, how he was hired by the TVA, labor unions, salaries, the hospital at Kentucky Dam Village, accidents and deaths at Kentucky Dam and Douglas Dam, the capture of a German spy, work conditions and the affects the dam had on the region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Conner, Dorisanna
Date of interview: 1995 May 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH227
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Schmidt, Draffen
Biographical note: Draffen Schmidt was born at Marshall County, Kentucky in 1913. He worked as a water boy, laborer and pump and crane operator for the Tennessee Valley Authority from July of 1941 until spring of 1945. He was laid off briefly in 1943. After the completion of the Kentucky Dam, he worked various construction jobs along Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley. He retired in 1978.
Description: Draffen Schmidt recalls his experiences in rural Marshall County, Kentucky prior to the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He described hourly pay rates, being hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority, job responsibilities, working the nightshift, accidental deaths, employee injuries, safety procedures, apprenticeships and the training of workers. He mentioned relationships between management and laborer, labor unions, segregation, race relations and community activities.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hosking, Michael
Date of interview: 1995 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH218
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Sears, Richard E. (Part 1)
Biographical note: Richard E. Sears was born at Paducah, Kentucky on April 28, 1915. He was raised in Paducah, attended local public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in 1933. He attended Murray State Teachers College from 1933 to 1934 and the University of Kentucky from 1935 to 1938, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. He briefly worked with the National Youth Administration at Paducah before he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the spring of 1939 to work on the Kentucky Dam. He remained at the Kentucky Dam until 1948 when he was transferred to another TVA construction site. He continued to work for the TVA on numerous other projects including the Watauga, Boone and South Holston Dams in Tennessee and the Shawnee Fossil Plant near Paducah. He retired from the TVA in 1976. He died on March 25, 2008.
Description: Richard E. Sears describes his experiences as a draftsman and electrical engineer working with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam. He recalls the region prior to the construction of the dam, including the lack of industry, rural road system and ferries crossing the river. He recollects participating in the National Youth Administration at Paducah before being hired by the TVA. He discusses the hiring process, salaries, his duties and responsibilities, labor union relations with management, public safety operations, living conditions at the Kentucky Dam Village, racial relations (no mixed race work crews in his department), work related accidents and construction problems.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Meyer, Jeff
Date of interview: 1995 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH219
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Moore, Eugene
Biographical note: Eugene Moore was born on Route 3 in Murray, Kentucky on December 9, 1924. He attended the Murray City School, Murray State School, and Almo School. When the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began construction on the Kentucky Dam project he worked for his father who owned a lumber company, which cleared timber where the reservoir presently exists. In 1943, he was drafted in the Navy and served in the Pacific Theater of the Second World War. After he was discharged, he briefly attended Murray State College before he worked with a trucking company from 1948 to 1959. He and his wife later opened a restaurant and a small clothing store in Murray.
Description: Eugene Moore discusses life in the Jackson Purchase area of Kentucky before, during and after the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began construction on the Kentucky Dam. He describes the history of the area and the early pioneers that settled in the region around the dam. He recalls the impact the dam had during the Second World War and the post-War era. Much of the interview focuses on biographical information pertaining to Eugene Moore and family history.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hosking, Michael
Date of interview: 1995 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH211
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Sears, Richard E. (Part 2)
Biographical note: Richard E. Sears was born at Paducah, Kentucky on April 28, 1915. He was raised in Paducah, attended local public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in 1933. He attended Murray State Teachers College from 1933 to 1934 and the University of Kentucky from 1935 to 1938, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. He briefly worked with the National Youth Administration at Paducah before he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the spring of 1939 to work on the Kentucky Dam. He remained at the Kentucky Dam until 1948 when he was transferred to another TVA construction site. He continued to work for the TVA on numerous other projects including the Watauga, Boone and South Holston Dams in Tennessee and the Shawnee Fossil Plant near Paducah. He retired from the TVA in 1976. He died on March 25, 2008.
Description: Richard E. Sears describes his experiences as a draftsman and electrical engineer working with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam. He recalls the region prior to the construction of the dam, including the lack of industry, rural road system and ferries crossing the river. He recollects participating in the National Youth Administration at Paducah before being hired by the TVA. He discusses the hiring process, salaries, his duties and responsibilities, labor union relations with management, public safety operations, living conditions at the Kentucky Dam Village, racial relations (no mixed race work crews in his department), work related accidents and construction problems.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Meyer, Jeff
Date of interview: 1995 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH219
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Edwards, Henry Buel
Biographical note: Henry Buel Edwards was born on March 21, 1921 in Marshall County, Kentucky. In 1941, he began working for Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He worked for the TVA for two years before being drafted into the United States Army. After the Second World War, he attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and later served as an environmentalist for the Marshall County Health Department. He died on February 27, 2004.
Description: Buel Edwards of Marshall County, Kentucky describes his experiences as a messenger boy working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He discusses the social, economic and environmental impact of the TVA on Marshall County, Kentucky before, during and after the construction of the dam. Edwards examines the construction of the dam in detail. The interview concludes with Buell Edwards’ wife discussing family and local history and the preservation of artifacts from the era before the dam.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Miller, Chamonie S.
Date of interview: 1995 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH197
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Joyce, Thelbert
Biographical note: Thelbert Joyce was born on July 30, 1918 in Trigg County, Kentucky. He worked with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) building roads in the area and later employed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He worked for the TVA from 1941 to 1944, after which he entered the United States Navy. When he was discharged from the Navy he was reemployed by the TVA. Joyce later owned a grocery store and worked for the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area. He died on June 26, 2010.
Description: Thelbert Joyce describes life in Trigg County, Kentucky prior to the construction of the Kentucky Dam and his years of employment with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). He describes his duties during the dam’s construction prior to and after his service in the United States Navy during the Second World War. The topics discussed include working conditions, unions, hiring practices and the economic and environmental impact the dam had on Trigg County and the surrounding areas. Joyce also mentions his military service in the Navy, the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Night Riders, racial and class discrimination in Trigg County and the effects of the Social Security program.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Miller, Chamonie S.
Date of interview: 1995 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH208
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Williams, Howard (Part 1)
Biographical note: Howard Williams was born in Marshall County, Kentucky on October 9, 1909. He was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a laborer during the construction of the Kentucky Dam in 1938. He was eventually promoted to a carpenter’s apprentice and later as a carpenter. Prior to working for the TVA, he worked several months in Detroit at the Dodge motor plant and briefly on the Paducah flood wall. After the dam was completed he became a building contractor. He served as the Building Trades representative in Paducah for five years. He died on March 12, 2000.
Description: Howard Williams recalls his experiences working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. The interview contains many detailed stories related to the dam from the late 1930’s through the mid 1940’s. He describes how the TVA deceived some land owners into purchasing their land, the TVA’s hiring process, dangerous working conditions, accidental deaths, salaries, labor unions, working the graveyard shift and various other projects he worked on. He retells a story of a black laborer who found a vein of gold while working on the dam and sealed it in concrete so as to prevent others from discovering the vein.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH229
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Williams, Howard (Part 2)
Biographical note: Howard Williams was born in Marshall County, Kentucky on October 9, 1909. He was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a laborer during the construction of the Kentucky Dam in 1938. He was eventually promoted to a carpenter’s apprentice and later as a carpenter. Prior to working for the TVA, he worked several months in Detroit at the Dodge motor plant and briefly on the Paducah flood wall. After the dam was completed he became a building contractor. He served as the Building Trades representative in Paducah for five years. He died on March 12, 2000.
Description: Howard Williams recalls his experiences working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. The interview contains many detailed stories related to the dam from the late 1930’s through the mid 1940’s. He describes how the TVA deceived some land owners into purchasing their land, the TVA’s hiring process, dangerous working conditions, accidental deaths, salaries, labor unions, working the graveyard shift and various other projects he worked on. He retells a story of a black laborer who found a vein of gold while working on the dam and sealed it in concrete so as to prevent others from discovering the vein.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH229
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Holt, George Washington
Biographical note: George Washington “G.W.” Holt was born on February 22, 1918 in Birmingham, Kentucky. He began work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam Project in 1939 and worked on the dam for five years. Holt worked as a pipefitter and was a member of the Steamfitters Local 184. George Holt died on March 2, 2009 in Benton, Kentucky.
Description: George Washington “G.W.” Holt describes his experience working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam Project from 1939 to 1944. He provides a short explanation of his duties as a pipefitter on the dam. Topics discussed in the interview include his opinions on George Jessup, racial relations, work procedures, injuries and fatalities, training, and the Kentucky Dam Village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Miller, Chamonie S.
Date of interview: 1995 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH203
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: White, Zelma (part 2)
Biographical note: Zelma White was born in Reidland, Kentucky on March 25, 1926, and lived in Reidland until age 31, when she moved to Paducah. Both she and her father worked for TVA on the Kentucky Dam project. White was employed by TVA, working both in the administration building and later as an office clerk in the hospital in Kentucky Dam Village. White was employed by TVA from May 1944 until December 1945, when she left employment instead of moving to a new TVA project in Parsons, Tennessee.
Description: Zelma White discusses her experiences working as an office clerk for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of Kentucky Dam from 1944 to 1945. She describes working both in the TVA administrative offices and in the office of the Kentucky Dam Village hospital. White relates encounters with Luther Draffen and George Jessup and discusses Jessup’s reputation among the TVA employees. White also discusses observation visits by Chinese engineers to the Dam and talks about President Harry Truman’s visit to the Dam, at which she was present. White also discusses the physical layout of Kentucky Dam Village and life in the Village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1995 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH228
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: White, Zelma (Part 1)
Biographical note: Zelma White was born in Reidland, Kentucky on March 25, 1926, and lived in Reidland until age 31, when she moved to Paducah. Both she and her father worked for TVA on the Kentucky Dam project. White was employed by TVA, working both in the administration building and later as an office clerk in the hospital in Kentucky Dam Village. White was employed by TVA from May 1944 until December 1945, when she left employment instead of moving to a new TVA project in Parsons, Tennessee.
Description: Zelma White discusses her experiences working as an office clerk for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of Kentucky Dam from 1944 to 1945. She describes working both in the TVA administrative offices and in the office of the Kentucky Dam Village hospital. White relates encounters with Luther Draffen and George Jessup and discusses Jessup’s reputation among the TVA employees. White also discusses observation visits by Chinese engineers to the Dam and talks about President Harry Truman’s visit to the Dam, at which she was present. White also discusses the physical layout of Kentucky Dam Village and life in the Village.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1995 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH228
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Voeglin, Glenn
Biographical note: Glen Voegelin was born in the State of Oklahoma in 1912. He served as an assistant field engineer and chief surveyor at the Kentucky Dam during its construction from the latter part of 1941 to the early part of 1946. Prior to being hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority, he worked in construction and as a surveyor in Oklahoma.
Description: Glen Voegelin discusses his years of employment as a field engineer and chief surveyor for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He discusses how he was hired by the TVA, his duties as chief surveyor, work related accidents and deaths, race relations, segregation and living at the Kentucky Dam Village.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Miller, Chamonie S.
Date of interview: 1995 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH223
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Fox, Johnny B.
Biographical note: Johnny B. Fox was born December 3, 1924 in Eddyville, Kentucky. He began working for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on construction of the Kentucky Dam in 1942 and remained until the dam was completed in 1945. After the dam’s completion he worked for the Kentucky Department of Parks and resided in the Kentucky Dam Village before it was dismantled. He later was employed as the chief of maintenance for the Crounse Corporation at Grand Rivers, Kentucky. He died on June 2, 2003.
Description: Johnny B. Fox of Lyon County, Kentucky describes his employment with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of Kentucky Dam. He recounts how he was hired, his regular duties and activities on the worksite. He recalled social interactions among workers, injuries and fatalities, racial relations and the high employee turnover rate. Fox described his responsibilities as a park ranger for the Kentucky Department of Parks after the dam's completion and further discussed his daily activities while residing at Kentucky Dam Village from 1942 to 1946.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, Tim
Date of interview: 1995 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH200
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Barrett, Charles
Biographical note: Charles Barrett was born in 1919 in Marshall County, Kentucky. In 1940, he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam.
Description: Charles Barrett discusses his employment with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He describes his life growing up in Marshall County, Kentucky, and the development of the area prior to the construction of the dam. He recalls construction techniques used when building the dam and labor and management relationships during the 1940s. Topics such as pay rates, unions, race relations and the impact of the dam upon the residents of the region were discussed.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, Tim
Date of interview: 1995 November 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH191
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Stice, King (Part 1)
Biographical note: King Chandler Stice was born at Calvert City, Kentucky on October 11, 1915. He attended local public schools and after graduating high school worked as a radio inspector at Crosley Radio Corporation in Cincinnati. He returned to Calvert City and was hired as an electrician with the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1938 and worked there until 1939. He enlisted in the United States Army in January of 1942 and served as a communication chief until 1946. After the war, he worked as an electrician. Stice retired as a maintenance foreman from Pennwalt Corporation in 1980. He passed away on October 4, 2006 at Calvert City.
Description: King Chandler Stice describes his experiences as an electrician working for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He explained in detail the process of building the locks and the different machines and mechanical devices required to complete the project. He recalled the Tennessee River freezing over in the winter of 1938/1939 and that construction continued even when temperatures dropped below zero. He discussed the role of trade unions and apprentice programs. He mentions the Great Depression, previous employers, the construction of public schools in Marshall County, his military service during the Second World War (27th Coast Artillery Battalion), working conditions at the dam, moonshiners in the region, resistance of inhabitants to relocation, Flood of 1937 and other stories related to the history of Calvert City and Marshall County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 November 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH221
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Stice, King (Part 2)
Biographical note: King Chandler Stice was born at Calvert City, Kentucky on October 11, 1915. He attended local public schools and after graduating high school worked as a radio inspector at Crosley Radio Corporation in Cincinnati. He returned to Calvert City and was hired as an electrician with the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1938 and worked there until 1939. He enlisted in the United States Army in January of 1942 and served as a communication chief until 1946. After the war, he worked as an electrician. Stice retired as a maintenance foreman from Pennwalt Corporation in 1980. He passed away on October 4, 2006 at Calvert City.
Description: King Chandler Stice describes his experiences as an electrician working for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He explained in detail the process of building the locks and the different machines and mechanical devices required to complete the project. He recalled the Tennessee River freezing over in the winter of 1938/1939 and that construction continued even when temperatures dropped below zero. He discussed the role of trade unions and apprentice programs. He mentions the Great Depression, previous employers, the construction of public schools in Marshall County, his military service during the Second World War (27th Coast Artillery Battalion), working conditions at the dam, moonshiners in the region, resistance of inhabitants to relocation, Flood of 1937 and other stories related to the history of Calvert City and Marshall County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 November 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH221
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Duvin Mine Explosion - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cates, Douglas Hayes
Biographical note: Douglas Hayes Cates was born at Providence Kentucky on September 4, 1921. He was raised in a coal mining family and was seventeen at the time of the Duvin Mine Explosion on July 14, 1939. He was one of the last miners to escape the mine after the explosion. After the accident, he returned to coal mining and retired as a miner on September 10, 1988.
Description: Douglas H. Cates provides a firsthand account of the Duvin Mine explosion that occurred on July 14, 1939 in Providence, Kentucky. The disaster killed twenty eight miners and left ten wounded. He describes the conditions faced by coal miners in central Kentucky in the first half of the twentieth century. Cates details various aspects of coal mining life, including the company stores, “flickers”, accident compensation, wages and comradely among miners. He concludes by describing various events related to the unionization of the coal miners in the 1930s.
Descriptors: Mine explosions -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Dunn, Robyn W.
Date of interview: 1995 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH184
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Duvin Mine Explosion - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cates, Douglas Hayes
Biographical note: Douglas Hayes Cates was born at Providence Kentucky on September 4, 1921. He was raised in a coal mining family and was seventeen at the time of the Duvin Mine Explosion on July 14, 1939. He was one of the last miners to escape the mine after the explosion. After the accident, he returned to coal mining and retired as a miner on September 10, 1988.
Description: Douglas H. Cates provides a firsthand account of the Duvin Mine explosion that occurred on July 14, 1939 in Providence, Kentucky. The disaster killed twenty eight miners and left ten wounded. He describes the conditions faced by coal miners in central Kentucky in the first half of the twentieth century. Cates details various aspects of coal mining life, including the company stores, “flickers”, accident compensation, wages and comradely among miners. He concludes by describing various events related to the unionization of the coal miners in the 1930s.
Descriptors: Mine explosions -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Dunn, Robyn W.
Date of interview: 1995 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH184
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Moore, Robert (Part 1)
Biographical note: Robert Moore was born in Little Cypress, Marshall County, Kentucky, where he grew up and worked on his family farm. His family home was lost during the Flood of 1937. In 1940, he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority as a laborer and machinist’s apprentice when the Kentucky Dam was under construction. Moore worked for six months as a machinist before being reassigned to deliver water to other employees working on the Dam’s locks and spillway. After the Dam’s completion, he worked as a machinist’s assistant for eleven years in the power plant.
Description: Robert Moore discusses his experiences working on the Kentucky Dam during the 1940s. He mentions his early childhood on a farm at Little Cypress, Kentucky and the Flood of 1937 which destroyed his family home. He describes his terms of employment with the Tennessee Valley Authority and responsibilities as a laborer and a machinist’s apprentice. He recalled the accidental deaths of two workers, joining the laborers union, a three day strike that occurred in 1940 and relationships between management and employees. He also discusses the impact the dam had on nearby communities.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH212
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Moore, Robert (Part 2)
Biographical note: Robert Moore was born in Little Cypress, Marshall County, Kentucky, where he grew up and worked on his family farm. His family home was lost during the Flood of 1937. In 1940, he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority as a laborer and machinist’s apprentice when the Kentucky Dam was under construction. Moore worked for six months as a machinist before being reassigned to deliver water to other employees working on the Dam’s locks and spillway. After the Dam’s completion, he worked as a machinist’s assistant for eleven years in the power plant.
Description: Robert Moore discusses his experiences working on the Kentucky Dam during the 1940s. He mentions his early childhood on a farm at Little Cypress, Kentucky and the Flood of 1937 which destroyed his family home. He describes his terms of employment with the Tennessee Valley Authority and responsibilities as a laborer and a machinist’s apprentice. He recalled the accidental deaths of two workers, joining the laborers union, a three day strike that occurred in 1940 and relationships between management and employees. He also discusses the impact the dam had on nearby communities.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 November 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH212
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Duvin Mine Explosion - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Davis, Nettie and Calbert, Virginia
Biographical note: Nettie Davis was born December 5, 1921. She was the sister of James R. Gaither, a miner that died in the Duvin Mine explosion on July 14, 1939. Virginia Calbert was born on May 6, 1906. She was the wife of George Louis Springfield, another miner who died in the disaster. She remarried in 1972 and died on June 3, 2004.
Description: Nettie Davis and Virginia Calbert discuss their recollections of the Duvin Mine explosion on July 14, 1939 at Providence, Kentucky. They discuss James R. Gaither, the brother of Ms. Davis, and George Louis Springfield, the husband of Mrs. Calbert, who perished in the explosion. They describe the scene outside the mine in the hours and days following the explosion and the impact of the disaster on the community. They also recount the racial and economic conditions of the area at that time.
Descriptors: Mine explosions -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Dunn, Robyn W.
Date of interview: 1995 November 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH185
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Duvin Mine Explosion - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Weldon, Nadine
Biographical note: Nadine Weldon was born February 26, 1915 in Providence, Kentucky. She is the sister of Douglas Cates, survivor of the Duvin Mine Explosion on July 14, 1939.
Description: Nadine Weldon discusses the Duvin Mine Explosion which occurred in Providence, Kentucky on July 14, 1939. She was a sister of a survivor and provides a detailed account of the events at the mine and the rescue efforts that followed the explosion. She describes life in a mining community in western Kentucky during the 1930s. She also discusses the relationship her family had with F. V. Ruckman, the owner of the mine.
Descriptors: Mine explosions -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Dunn, Robyn W.
Date of interview: 1995 November 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH188
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Depriest, Frank
Biographical note: Frank Depriest was born on July 21, 1909 in Lyon County, Kentucky on the east side of the Tennessee River. In 1921, he went to Charleston, Missouri with his brother but later returned to Lyon County in 1928. In 1936 and 1937 he worked on the East Alton, Illinois dam construction project. In May 1940, he was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He quit the TVA in March of 1942 and returned to farming. He later owned a grocery store in Eddyville. He died in an automobile accident on April 30, 1996 at age 86.
Description: Frank Depriest discusses his experiences while working with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of Kentucky Dam and the relocation of homesteads in the early 1940s. He recalls the region prior to the construction of the dam and the impact of the TVA on the residents living in the Tennessee Valley. He describes his duties as a construction laborer and the various work related projects associated with the dam. Issues such as racial relations, job safety and interaction with co-workers are mentioned throughout the interview.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, Tim
Date of interview: 1995 November 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH194
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Fields, Joe
Biographical note: Joe Fields was born on June 29, 1926 in Benton, Kentucky. He graduated from Benton High School in May of 1943 and began to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam in July of the same year. In May of 1944, he volunteered for military service in the United States Navy. After his discharge he returned to TVA and worked on other construction projects until 1958 when he resigned and began to work for the Gilbertsville Post-Office.
Description: Joe Fields of Marshall County, Kentucky discusses his experience with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He recounts the day he was hired and his assigned duties as a mail-carrier on the worksite. He recalls employee horseplay, safety concerns, alcohol consumption on the worksite, thievery, social interactions, labor unions and racial relations.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Meyer, Jeff
Date of interview: 1995 November 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH199
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Oakley, Jewell
Biographical note: Jewell Oakley was born on June 23, 1915 near Aurora, Kentucky in Marshall County. At age fifteen his family relocated to Calvert City, Kentucky, where he worked on the family farm. He was hired as a laborer by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the fall of 1939 and after a few months he became an apprentice. He was drafted into the United States Army in the latter part of 1944 and served as a trainer in a field artillery unit. An illness prevented him from going overseas and he later was discharged for medical reasons. After the war, Oakley returned to work on the dam until it was completed. He later farmed and worked in construction. In 1950, he was hired by Air Products and Chemical Company at Calvert City in their maintenance department. He remained at the plant for twenty five years before retiring in 1975.
Description: Jewell Oakley describes working for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction of the Kentucky Dam from November of 1939 until he was drafted into the United States Army in the latter part of 1944. He recalled his childhood and early adulthood on the family farm in Marshall County, Kentucky. He told of accidental deaths at the dam, workers being crippled and construction equipment failures. He discussed his daily duties as a laborer and equipment maintenance apprentice. He spoke of horseplay among workers, race relations, schedules, safety procedures, joining the union, the Thanksgiving strike of 1940 and working under severe weather conditions. He concludes with the many changes the dam brought to nearby communities and the Flood of 1937.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Marshall, Tim
Date of interview: 1995 November 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH214
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Woolfolk, James
Biographical note: James Woolfolk was born at DeQueen, Arkansas in September 4, 1920. He and his parents relocated to Nashville in 1929. He attended local public schools and worked several jobs prior to being employed by the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1941. Woolfolk served as a public safety officer at the Kentucky Dam from August of 1941 until he was drafted in the United States Army in November of 1943. He returned from the war in 1946 and continued to work for the TVA until his retirement on January 1, 1981.
Description: James Woolfolk discusses his experiences as a public safety officer for the Tennessee Valley Authority during the construction Kentucky Dam from 1941 to 1943 and afterwards from 1946 to 1981. He describes the infrastructure of his division, the Division of Reservoir Properties, which was responsible for maintaining the reservoir. Woolfolk describes the duties of his position, patrol routes, and events and activities in Kentucky Dam Village. He mentions practical jokes that took place during the construction of the Dam, such as men nailing their coworker’s lunch boxes to the floor.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hosking, Michael
Date of interview: 1995 November 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH230
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Smith, Ralph
Biographical note: Ralph Smith was born in Marshall County, Kentucky on August 11, 1926. He grew up and attended local public schools in Marshall County. He was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the fall of 1943 as a laborer. He was drafted in the United States military in 1944. Smith served in the South Pacific and saw action at Peleliu and was awarded a Purple Heart. After the war, he worked as a carpenter and maintenance man for Airco Carbide for twenty years and later for the GAF Corporation. Smith retired in 1993 and died on May 9, 2012 at Calvert City, Kentucky.
Description: Ralph Smith describes working the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a laborer during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He recalls the region prior to the construction of the dam and being hired by the TVA. He describes pouring concrete, working twelve hour shifts, the construction of concrete barges, safety procedures and other duties he performed while employed for the TVA. He concludes with a description of the many changes which occurred after the completion of the dam.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hosking, Michael
Date of interview: 1995 November 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH220
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Duvin Mine Explosion - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Green, Patricia
Biographical note: Patricia “Trisha” Green was born in Providence, Kentucky on September 25, 1943. Many in her family worked in the coal mines of western Kentucky. Her family relocated soon after her birth buts she returned to Providence prior to the interview.
Description: Patricia “Trisha” Green provides a second hand account of the Duvin Mine explosion on July 14, 1939 at Providence, Kentucky. She received information of the disaster through her mother whose brother-in-law, Carl “Big Boy” Holloman, Jr., had perished in the mine explosion. She describes the rescue efforts and the impact that the disaster had on her family along with the community of Providence. She also explores aspects of unionization of the miners, mining scripts or “flickers”, safety concerns and racial issues.
Descriptors: Mine explosions -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Dunn, Robyn W.
Date of interview: 1995 November 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH186
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cole, Christine
Biographical note: Christine Cole was an African American elementary school teacher from Clinton, Kentucky. She graduated from Lincoln High School in Paducah, Kentucky in 1932. After graduation, she taught briefly in a one-room schoolhouse at Spring Hill, Hickman County, Kentucky before she attended West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah. She taught third, fourth, and fifth grade at Kane Elementary in Clinton until 1966, with intermittent episodes of teaching in Kibble and Oakton, Kentucky prior to her retirement in 1966. In 1954, she graduated from Kentucky State University with a degree in education.
Description: Christine Cole provides insight on how the threat of integration led to improvements in the African American public schools in Hickman County, Kentucky as the school system attempted to prove the equitably treatment of both African American and white students. She describes the daily routine of students and teachers at the Kane Elementary School in Clinton, Kentucky and the physical conditions of the school building. She discloses her various salaries over the course of her career as an elementary school teacher. She also mentions genealogical information.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Ross, Steve
Date of interview: 1995 October 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH240
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Brown, James
Biographical note: James Brown was born on December 30, 1915 in Calloway County, Kentucky to Will Brown and Bertha Webb Brown. He first attended the Waters School in 1926 and continued through the eighth grade. After completing two years at Concord High School, Brown enlisted in the United States Army for four years as a private first class during World War II. He served with the Murray City Police force for twenty-one years and retired as the Police Chief. After his first wife Elaine Ahart Brown died in December 1986, he remarried to Odell Brown. He died on March 16, 2002 at Westview Nursing Home in Murray, Kentucky. Waters Schoolhouse is the only remaining one-room schoolhouse in Calloway County. It was named for the first teacher who taught at the schoolhouse when it opened in the late 1800s, Joseph Spillman Waters. The schoolhouse was donated to and moved to Murray-Calloway County Central Park in the 1970s. Renovations occurred from 1985 to 2002 and the building received an official Kentucky Historical Society marker in 2006.
Description: James Brown describes in detail his education at the one-room Waters School at New Concord, Calloway County, Kentucky in the 1920s and early 1930s. He recalled the school’s facilities, assignments, class plays, spelling bees, punishments received by mischievous students and significant activities and events during the academic year. The school served about twenty-five to forty-five students from the first through eighth grades.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Trawick, Nancy D.
Date of interview: 1995 October 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH235
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Joe Pat
Biographical note: Joe Pat Ward was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on August 17, 1923. He was raised and educated in the county. Before being hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority he worked on the family farm and was a mill laborer at Murray (Kentucky) Milk Products Company. He worked for the TVA from the spring of 1941 to the spring of 1943. He was drafted into the United States Army in March of 1943. He saw combat duty in three major campaigns in Europe. He returned to Calloway County in 1946 but did not work for the TVA.
Description: Joe Pat Ward discusses his employment as head mail clerk for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He describes the living conditions and lack of industry in the region prior to the building of the dam. He recalls working on the family farm, the Great Depression, being hired by the TVA, work conditions, salaries, duties he performed, work related accidents, race relations and the benefits of the dam to the region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Meyer, Jeff
Date of interview: 1995 October 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH224
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Crisp, Bettie Ann
Biographical note: Betty Ann Crisp was born in Clinton, Kentucky in 1933. She attended Kane Elementary School when she was six years old and continued through to the eighth grade. She graduated from the segregated Hickman High School in Kentucky. She married Earl Crisp Junior and had six children. Her husband died on October 15, 2009. As of February 2014, she is a board member of Hickman County Senior Citizens, Inc. and involved with the Hickman County Library.
Description: Betty Ann Crisp describes the physical conditions of the Kane School, an African American elementary school in Clinton, Hickman County, Kentucky, in the late 1930s and 1940s. She details both the academic and recreational aspects of her elementary education, including the games that the girls played during recess, her teachers, the annual graduation ceremony and punishments received by mischievous students. She recalls how the town of Clinton did not have a high school for African Americans, so she and others from Clinton had to travel a complicated busing route to attend the segregated high school at Hickman, Kentucky. She mentioned school consolidation in Hickman County as a parent and describes the experiences of her son when he transferred to the desegregated Central School of Hickman County in the sixth grade.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Ross, Steve
Date of interview: 1995 October 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH243
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Gray, Lucille
Biographical note: Lucille A. Gray was born in Clinton, Kentucky in 1948. She attended first through eighth grade at Kane School in Clinton, Kentucky until 1964. She attended Riverview High School in Hickman, Kentucky.
Description: Lucille Gray describes Kane School, the African American elementary school in Clinton, Kentucky, during the late 1950s and early 1960s. She names the teachers at the school and which grades they taught. She mentions how the students from her neighborhood rode a bus to school. She describes the physical conditions and setup of the school, such as the building having separate rooms for each grade and stoves in each room for heat. She talks about recess and playing basketball, baseball, tag, and other games. Before there was a cafeteria, the children brought food from home and ate lunch in the classroom. She remembers the addition of the cafeteria and liking the food and lists off some of the food prepared for them in the cafeteria. She mentions Principal Cole serving as the enforcer of discipline and the use of corporal punishment. After attending Kane School, she discusses being bused to Hickman, Kentucky to attend River View High School.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Ross, Steve
Date of interview: 1995 October 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH251
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Byrd, Sally
Biographical note: Sally Byrd worked periodically for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation in Owensboro, Kentucky from the early 1930s to the end of the Second World War.
Description: Sally Byrd recounts her experiences working for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky from the early 1930s to the end of the Second World War. She describes why she began to work at the plant, the hourly wages she received, general working conditions and the age and social makeup of her coworkers. She expressed in detail her feelings on labor unions and their activities before and during the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1995 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH179
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Duvin Mine Explosion - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: McDowell, Linda Earl
Biographical note: Linda Earl McDowell was born February 9, 1940, seven months after the Duvin Mine Explosion in Providence, Kentucky on July 14, 1939. Her father, Earl White Woodring, died in the mine. Her mother remarried another miner. The family maintained close ties with F. V. Ruckman, the owner of the Duvin Mine, up until his death in 1951.
Description: Linda Earl McDowell discusses the Duvin Mine explosion on July 14, 1939 at Providence, Kentucky. Her account of the disaster was told by her mother, family members, newspaper clippings, other miners and F. V. Ruckman, the owner of the mine. She discusses her father, Earl White Woodring, one of the miners killed by the blast. She details the lives of the miners, including safety issues, script (“flickers”) and the unionization of the mines. She discusses Ruckman’s impact on her family and interactions with him following the explosion.
Descriptors: Mine explosions -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Dunn, Robyn W.
Date of interview: 1995 October 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH187
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Thurmond, James (Part 1)
Biographical note: James Wilber Thurmond was born on September 5, 1918 in Calloway County, Kentucky. At age fourteen his family relocated to Murray where his father established a feed mill and coal distribution business. He was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority in November of 1941 as the senior typist for the project historian. He was drafted into the United States Navy in April of 1944 and served the final year of the Second World War as a typist at battalion headquarters. After the war, he was employed by the Bank of Murray as a bookkeeper and later as a branch manager. He worked for the bank for thirty seven years before retiring in 1983. He died at Murray on June 6, 2007.
Description: James Wilber Thurmond discusses his experiences while working as a typist for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He described the Great Depression, living conditions and employment opportunities in the region prior to the construction of the dam. He recalled his daily activities as the typist for the project historian. He mentioned his family history, childhood and early adulthood experiences, the Great Depression, industries in Murray before the construction of the dam, departure of area men to seek work in Detroit and Akron, colleagues and supervisors he worked with, six day work weeks, labor shortages, women replacing men leaving for the war, service in the United States Navy during the Second World War and the positive effects of the dam on the region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 October 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH222
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Thurmond, James (Part 2)
Biographical note: James Wilber Thurmond was born on September 5, 1918 in Calloway County, Kentucky. At age fourteen his family relocated to Murray where his father established a feed mill and coal distribution business. He was hired by the Tennessee Valley Authority in November of 1941 as the senior typist for the project historian. He was drafted into the United States Navy in April of 1944 and served the final year of the Second World War as a typist at battalion headquarters. After the war, he was employed by the Bank of Murray as a bookkeeper and later as a branch manager. He worked for the bank for thirty seven years before retiring in 1983. He died at Murray on June 6, 2007.
Description: James Wilber Thurmond discusses his experiences while working as a typist for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) during the construction of the Kentucky Dam. He described the Great Depression, living conditions and employment opportunities in the region prior to the construction of the dam. He recalled his daily activities as the typist for the project historian. He mentioned his family history, childhood and early adulthood experiences, the Great Depression, industries in Murray before the construction of the dam, departure of area men to seek work in Detroit and Akron, colleagues and supervisors he worked with, six day work weeks, labor shortages, women replacing men leaving for the war, service in the United States Navy during the Second World War and the positive effects of the dam on the region.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Rousey, Eric
Date of interview: 1995 October 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH222
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: McGehee, Jack F.
Biographical note: Jack F. McGehee was born November 18, 1914. He graduated from E. W. Grove High School in 1932 and began working for the Golden Peacock Corporation, a cosmetics firm, while residing in Paris, Tennessee. In the spring of 1941, he began work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the Construction Department on the Kentucky Dam project doing clerical work. As the construction phase neared completion, McGehee was transferred back to Paris and worked in the Payroll Office until April of 1955. After leaving the TVA he worked for an insurance company until his retirement. Jack McGehee died on August 11, 1996.
Description: Jack F. McGehee discusses his time of employment with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the construction of Kentucky Dam from 1941 to 1946. He described his work experience prior to being employed by the TVA and the process by which he was hired. He recalls the daily tasks and worksite conditions, including wages, racial and gender relations and worker safety. The interview concludes with McGehee providing a list of names of possible individuals to interview at a later date.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Hosking, Michael
Date of interview: 1995 October 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH210
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Gunn, Pete, Jr. (part 1)
Biographical note: Pete Gunn Jr. was born August 18, 1920 in Winchester, Tennessee. His father moved the family to Benton, Kentucky on September 3, 1939 to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam. In September of 1941 he began working on the Kentucky Dam. While on the dam project he trained as an engineer. In 1943, he worked for a shipyard in Texas and later on the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. He returned to Benton in 1946 and worked in the automotive and sporting goods businesses, before joining his father-in-law in the insurance business in 1947. He was the founder and former owner of Morgan, Trevathan and Gunn Insurance, a former elder and deacon at the Benton Church of Christ and the Briensburg Church of Christ. He died on June 9, 2002.
Description: Pete Gunn Jr. describes his experiences while working with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam and the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. The interview contains a biographical accounting of his life and career through the late 1940s. He discusses his duties as a company messenger, training as an engineer and the interactions he had with management. Gunn covers a variety of topics including horseplay, safety, injuries and fatalities, employee relations and significant events. The interview concludes with a discussion on his time at Oakridge as part of the Manhattan Project.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Miller, Chamonie S.
Date of interview: 1995 October 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH201
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Kentucky Dam - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Gunn, Pete, Jr. (part 2)
Biographical note: Pete Gunn Jr. was born August 18, 1920 in Winchester, Tennessee. His father moved the family to Benton, Kentucky on September 3, 1939 to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam. In September of 1941 he began working on the Kentucky Dam. While on the dam project he trained as an engineer. In 1943, he worked for a shipyard in Texas and later on the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. He returned to Benton in 1946 and worked in the automotive and sporting goods businesses, before joining his father-in-law in the insurance business in 1947. He was the founder and former owner of Morgan, Trevathan and Gunn Insurance, a former elder and deacon at the Benton Church of Christ and the Briensburg Church of Christ. He died on June 9, 2002.
Description: Pete Gunn Jr. describes his experiences while working with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on the Kentucky Dam and the Manhattan Project at Oakridge, Tennessee. The interview contains a biographical accounting of his life and career through the late 1940s. He discusses his duties as a company messenger, training as an engineer and the interactions he had with management. Gunn covers a variety of topics including horseplay, safety, injuries and fatalities, employee relations and significant events. The interview concludes with a discussion on his time at Oakridge as part of the Manhattan Project.
Descriptors: Land Between the Lakes (Ky. and Tenn.) – History.
Interviewed by: Miller, Chamonie S.
Date of interview: 1995 October 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH201
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Young, Hazel
Biographical note: Hazel Young was born in 1923 at Owensboro, Kentucky. Soon after graduating from high school in 1941 she was employed by Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation. She met her husband at Ken-Rad and was married in October 1941. She worked at the plant until late 1942 when her husband was drafted and she relocated with him to a military training base. She returned to Ken-Rad for another year after her husband was stationed overseas.
Description: Hazel Young describes her experiences working at the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation of Owensboro, Kentucky during the Second World War. She describes the hiring process and her job assignments at the factory. She recalls the working conditions and the various amenities provided by the company for the workers. The interview concludes with her opinions on company benefits and the influence of labor unions.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH183
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: King, Lillian W.
Biographical note: Lillian W. King was born in Daviess County, Kentucky in 1910. She worked for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky from the early 1930s, throughout the Second World War and after the General Electric Company acquired the plant in 1952.
Description: Lillian W. King discusses her experiences working for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1950s. She describes the hiring process, training and how conditions changed during the Second World War. She recalled the introduction of labor unions and the harassment that followed for those that did not joining. She also mentioned how working conditions changed after the General Electric Company acquired Ken-Rad.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH181
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Whitaker, Edith
Biographical note: Edith Whitaker was born in 1921 in Owensboro, Kentucky. She was the youngest of seven children and graduated high school in 1939. After graduation, she was hired at Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation. She periodically worked at the plant during the Second World War. She left Ken-Rad when labor unions were introduced to the plant in 1945.
Description: Edith Whitaker discusses her experiences while working for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky between 1939 and 1945. She explains why she sought employment and described the working conditions at the factory. The interview concluded with her mentioning the limited benefits and some personal anecdotes.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH182
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Howard, Anna Grace
Biographical note: Anna Grace Howard worked periodically for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation and the General Electric Company in Owensboro, Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s. She was one of thirteen children. She worked at Ken-Rad at the age of sixteen in 1941.
Description: Anna Grace Howard discusses her career at the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation during the 1940s. She describes experiences working in a vacuum tube manufacturing plant during the Second World War. She also mentions the influence of labor unions and the changes that occurred when Ken-Rad was acquired by the General Electric Company in 1952.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH180
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Quirey, Wanda
Biographical note: Wanda Quirey was born in Christian County, Kentucky on July 18, 1921. She grew up in Crofton and Earlington, Kentucky. As a teenager she worked at a local drugstore. She married and moved to Sturgis, Kentucky in 1942. Her husband was a soldier with General George C. Patton’s Third Army Corps in Europe. During the war, she was a member of the Junior Women’s Club and worked for the Red Cross. She concludes with her thoughts on prominent political leaders and significant events of the war.
Description: Wanda Quirey details her experiences during the Second World War. She discusses her family background and memories following the attack on Pearl Harbor. She describes life in Western Kentucky during the Second World War and the general attitude in the region. She offers insight into the local war bond drives, rationing, Camp Breckinridge and Sturgis Airfield.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH150
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Fielder, Scott
Biographical note: Scott Field was born in Nashville, Tennessee. His father worked for the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railroad. Prior to the Second World War, he worked in a clothing factory making pants and shirts. He was drafted into the United States Army Infantry on February 11, 1942, and attended basic training in Tullahoma, Tennessee. He was later stationed in Tullahoma, Tennessee, Tacoma, Washington and at various bases in California, Hawaii, New Guinea, the Philippines and Japan. He was discharged in November of 1945 in Oregon after having spent the previous eight weeks stationed in Japan. Following the war, he returned to Tennessee and began working for the telephone company. In 1946, he moved to Detroit, Michigan where he remained for thirty six years.
Description: Scott Fielder details his experiences during the Second World War. He served from February 11, 1942 until November of 1945 and saw combat in the Pacific Theater. He was stationed in Tullahoma, Washington State, California, Hawaii, New Guinea, the Philippines, and Japan. He describes his training, service during the war and his discharge from the United States Army. He also gives his opinions on significant military and political figures and events during the Second World War.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH142
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Fielder, Dorothy
Biographical note: Dorothy Fielder was born in Henshaw, Union County, Kentucky in the early 1920s. During the Second World War she worked in a hosiery mill in Princeton, Kentucky.
Description: Dorothy Fielder details her experiences during the Second World War. She explains her time at the hosiery mill in Princeton, Kentucky. The interview concludes with her memories of life in Princeton during the war and her feelings on significant figures and events.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH141
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Lewis, Mae Evelyn
Biographical note: Mae Evelyn Lewis was born in Lyon County, Kentucky in 1913. She worked at a hosiery mill in Calloway County, Kentucky from 1927 until the end of the Second World War.
Description: Mae Evelyn Lewis details her experience during the Second World War. She describes life in the Jackson Purchase area of Kentucky during the late 1920s and 1930s. She provides detail into rationing during the Second World War and the way it impacted the region.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH146
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Parrent, Jessie Dail
Biographical note: Jessie Dail Parrent was born in 1922 in Lyon County, Kentucky. Her parents were sharecroppers and moved frequently about the county during her childhood. She met and married her husband in 1940. During the Second World War, she worked with her husband on their farm in Lyon County.
Description: Jessie Dail Parrent details her experiences during the Second World War. She explains her family background and life before the war. Her memories of the war focus upon rationing and the local men who died while in the service. She provides her thoughts on national and state politicians and concludes with post-war celebrations in the region.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH148
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Murphy, Katherine
Biographical note: Katherine Murphy was born in 1928 in Kentucky. During the Second World War, she worked at the Princeton Hosiery Mill. Her husband was a non commissioned officer stationed at Fort Dix, New Jersey.
Description: Katherine Murphy details her experiences during the Second World War. She describes her childhood and early adulthood. During the war, she was employed at the Princeton Hosiery Mill of Princeton, Kentucky. She discusses her duties at the plant and life during the war. She concludes by detailing her thoughts concerning significant political figures and major events during the war. She also describes post-war celebrations at Princeton, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH147
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.