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Title of Collection: Murray State 100th Anniversary - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Moore, Ray P.
Biographical note: Ray P. Moore was born in 1929. He attended Georgetown College for his undergraduate education. After graduation, he directed choral music at local churches. He was drafted into the United States Army during the Korean Conflict and was stationed in Europe as a sergeant and personnel specialist. He attended Murray State College for a Master degree in education administration and attained a Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Carbondale in 1966. He was hired by Murray State University in the summer of 1967as a part time instructor in the Secondary and Elementary Education Department to teach graduate courses.
Description: Ray P. Moore began the interview by discussing his undergraduate education at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky. He mentioned his early career directing church choirs and his stint in the United States Army in Europe. He spoke of how he commuted from Paducah to Murray, Kentucky to complete his Master in Administration. He described his time at the University of Illinois at Carbondale and recalled how he was hired as an associate professor at Murray State after he received his doctorate. He discussed the changes that came about as a result of the shift from Murray State’s status as a college to a university. Moore spoke of how the Vietnam War impacted his early years as a professor at Murray State and the antiwar demonstrations on campus. He discussed the general process of professor’s earning tenure and how he and a number of other professors under President Sparks were granted tenure by the Board of Regents on the basis that they had all been employed for at least three years. He discussed the more controversial approach to tenure during President Curris’s term and the legal battles that ensued. He also recalled the debate whether professors should unionize and the controversy over presenting unpopular or alternate ideas in the classroom. He described the surge in enrollment in the 1980s and his experiences in Murray during the 2009 Ice Storm. He concludes the interview with his views on education methods, the government’s role in education and standardized testing.
Descriptors: Murray State University -- History.
Interviewed by: Bolin, Wesley S.
Date of interview: 2013 April 10
Contributed by: Murray State 100th Anniversary Oral History Project
Identification number: MSU002
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Murray State 100th Anniversary - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Ernie R. (part 1)
Biographical note: Ernie R. Bailey was born in Murray, Kentucky on October 11, 1944. He began to attend Murray State Teacher Training School in Murray at the age of five. He graduated from the campus high school in 1962. He attended Murray State for four years and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English and History in 1966. While a student at Murray State, he worked in Pogue Library. After graduating from college, he taught for four years at Farmington High School in Graves County, Kentucky and one year at Murray High School. He attained his Master’s Degree in Education from Murray State in 1969. He attended summer sessions at George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee, where he obtained a Master in Library Science degree in 1973. In 1971, he obtained a fulltime position at Pogue Library, where he worked until his retirement in 2008. In 1977, he earned an Educational Specialist degree from George Peabody College. He later obtained a doctorate in Higher Education from Vanderbilt University in Nashville. As of April 2014, he resides in Murray with his wife, Dorothy Nell Bailey.
Description: Ernie Bailey began the interview with genealogical information on the Bailey family of Western Kentucky. He described the Murray Training School in Murray, Kentucky, including the building, the years of operation and its function as primary and secondary school. He mentioned his undergraduate and graduate career at Murray State College in the early 1960s and his teaching positions in Graves and Calloway Counties in Kentucky. He delved into how became employed at Forrest C. Pogue Library at Murray State. He chronicled the history of Murray State’s libraries, from the stage area of the auditorium at Murray Middle School to the contemporary Waterfield and Pogue libraries. He discussed the process of moving library collections between the various locations over time and the development of Special Collections and University Archives. He recalled the various uses of the floors and rooms of Pogue Library throughout its history. He also detailed the role of the Works Progress Administration in the construction of city streets in Murray, Cutchin Stadium and the cataloguing of local courthouse records. He named and described six of the presidents of Murray State, including Presidents Carr, Wells, Richmond, Woods, Sparks and Curris. He detailed the construction, use and change of buildings on campus, including Pogue Library, the Lowry Center, Waterfield Library, Wrather Museum, Wilson Hall, Lovett Auditorium, Carr Health, the Curris Center, Racer Arena, Old Fine Arts, Swan Hall, Wells Hall, Ordway Hall and the Faculty Clubhouse. He mentioned the role of Price Doyle in establishing the Department of Music. Bailey also recalled his campus involvement as a student at Murray State, including the marching band, singing in the choir and working at Pogue Library. He described the role of local women in operating boarding houses for students before dormitories were constructed and the establishment of the college farm. He discussed the Kentucky state legislature’s efforts and reasoning for establishing Murray State in the 1920s and the expansion of Murray State from a normal school. He explained the expansion of educational requirements for public school teachers in the 1960s and 1970s, which led teachers to return to college to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees. He recalled the quarter semester system and low enrollments at Murray State during the Second World War. He spoke of President Richmond’s role in securing grants for Federal Preflight and Naval training programs at Murray State during World War II. He remembered the ROTC program and anti-war rallies on Murray State’s campus during his time as a student during the Vietnam War and segregation during his childhood. He recounted the gradual desegregation of the town and the admission of African Americans to Murray State. He attributed the economic development of Murray and the surrounding area to the establishment of Murray State. He chronicled the history of churches in Murray during his lifetime and how Murray State impacted the local churches. He discussed the development of light industry in Calloway County, naming some of the most prominent factories and industrial employers in the area. He described the regional competition of towns in Western Kentucky over the bid for a state normal school and Rainey T. Wells’ role in winning the bid for Murray. He pointed out that the original part of Murray States’ campus was Wells’ farmland and Oakhurst, the president’s house, was Wells’ original home. He recalled the expansion of the city limits of Murray and Murray State’s role in the expansion. He largely ended the interview by describing the positive relations between Murray State and the town of Murray, which he attributes to the townspeople’s recognition of how Murray State has benefitted the area.
Descriptors: Murray State University -- History.
Interviewed by: Bolin, Wesley
Date of interview: 2013 March 27 and April 3
Contributed by: Murray State 100th Anniversary Oral History Project
Identification number: MSU001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Murray State 100th Anniversary - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Ernie R. (part 2)
Biographical note: Ernie R. Bailey was born in Murray, Kentucky on October 11, 1944. He began to attend Murray State Teacher Training School in Murray at the age of five. He graduated from the campus high school in 1962. He attended Murray State for four years and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English and History in 1966. While a student at Murray State, he worked in Pogue Library. After graduating from college, he taught for four years at Farmington High School in Graves County, Kentucky and one year at Murray High School. He attained his Master’s Degree in Education from Murray State in 1969. He attended summer sessions at George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee, where he obtained a Master in Library Science degree in 1973. In 1971, he obtained a fulltime position at Pogue Library, where he worked until his retirement in 2008. In 1977, he earned an Educational Specialist degree from George Peabody College. He later obtained a doctorate in Higher Education from Vanderbilt University in Nashville. As of April 2014, he resides in Murray with his wife, Dorothy Nell Bailey.
Description: Ernie Bailey began the interview with genealogical information on the Bailey family of Western Kentucky. He described the Murray Training School in Murray, Kentucky, including the building, the years of operation and its function as primary and secondary school. He mentioned his undergraduate and graduate career at Murray State College in the early 1960s and his teaching positions in Graves and Calloway Counties in Kentucky. He delved into how became employed at Forrest C. Pogue Library at Murray State. He chronicled the history of Murray State’s libraries, from the stage area of the auditorium at Murray Middle School to the contemporary Waterfield and Pogue libraries. He discussed the process of moving library collections between the various locations over time and the development of Special Collections and University Archives. He recalled the various uses of the floors and rooms of Pogue Library throughout its history. He also detailed the role of the Works Progress Administration in the construction of city streets in Murray, Cutchin Stadium and the cataloguing of local courthouse records. He named and described six of the presidents of Murray State, including Presidents Carr, Wells, Richmond, Woods, Sparks and Curris. He detailed the construction, use and change of buildings on campus, including Pogue Library, the Lowry Center, Waterfield Library, Wrather Museum, Wilson Hall, Lovett Auditorium, Carr Health, the Curris Center, Racer Arena, Old Fine Arts, Swan Hall, Wells Hall, Ordway Hall and the Faculty Clubhouse. He mentioned the role of Price Doyle in establishing the Department of Music. Bailey also recalled his campus involvement as a student at Murray State, including the marching band, singing in the choir and working at Pogue Library. He described the role of local women in operating boarding houses for students before dormitories were constructed and the establishment of the college farm. He discussed the Kentucky state legislature’s efforts and reasoning for establishing Murray State in the 1920s and the expansion of Murray State from a normal school. He explained the expansion of educational requirements for public school teachers in the 1960s and 1970s, which led teachers to return to college to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees. He recalled the quarter semester system and low enrollments at Murray State during the Second World War. He spoke of President Richmond’s role in securing grants for Federal Preflight and Naval training programs at Murray State during World War II. He remembered the ROTC program and anti-war rallies on Murray State’s campus during his time as a student during the Vietnam War and segregation during his childhood. He recounted the gradual desegregation of the town and the admission of African Americans to Murray State. He attributed the economic development of Murray and the surrounding area to the establishment of Murray State. He chronicled the history of churches in Murray during his lifetime and how Murray State impacted the local churches. He discussed the development of light industry in Calloway County, naming some of the most prominent factories and industrial employers in the area. He described the regional competition of towns in Western Kentucky over the bid for a state normal school and Rainey T. Wells’ role in winning the bid for Murray. He pointed out that the original part of Murray States’ campus was Wells’ farmland and Oakhurst, the president’s house, was Wells’ original home. He recalled the expansion of the city limits of Murray and Murray State’s role in the expansion. He largely ended the interview by describing the positive relations between Murray State and the town of Murray, which he attributes to the townspeople’s recognition of how Murray State has benefitted the area.
Descriptors: Murray State University -- History.
Interviewed by: Bolin, Wesley
Date of interview: 2013 March 27 and April 3
Contributed by: Murray State 100th Anniversary Oral History Project
Identification number: MSU001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Murray State 100th Anniversary - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Ernie R. (part 3)
Biographical note: Ernie R. Bailey was born in Murray, Kentucky on October 11, 1944. He began to attend Murray State Teacher Training School in Murray at the age of five. He graduated from the campus high school in 1962. He attended Murray State for four years and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English and History in 1966. While a student at Murray State, he worked in Pogue Library. After graduating from college, he taught for four years at Farmington High School in Graves County, Kentucky and one year at Murray High School. He attained his Master’s Degree in Education from Murray State in 1969. He attended summer sessions at George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee, where he obtained a Master in Library Science degree in 1973. In 1971, he obtained a fulltime position at Pogue Library, where he worked until his retirement in 2008. In 1977, he earned an Educational Specialist degree from George Peabody College. He later obtained a doctorate in Higher Education from Vanderbilt University in Nashville. As of April 2014, he resides in Murray with his wife, Dorothy Nell Bailey.
Description: Ernie Bailey began the interview with genealogical information on the Bailey family of Western Kentucky. He described the Murray Training School in Murray, Kentucky, including the building, the years of operation and its function as primary and secondary school. He mentioned his undergraduate and graduate career at Murray State College in the early 1960s and his teaching positions in Graves and Calloway Counties in Kentucky. He delved into how became employed at Forrest C. Pogue Library at Murray State. He chronicled the history of Murray State’s libraries, from the stage area of the auditorium at Murray Middle School to the contemporary Waterfield and Pogue libraries. He discussed the process of moving library collections between the various locations over time and the development of Special Collections and University Archives. He recalled the various uses of the floors and rooms of Pogue Library throughout its history. He also detailed the role of the Works Progress Administration in the construction of city streets in Murray, Cutchin Stadium and the cataloguing of local courthouse records. He named and described six of the presidents of Murray State, including Presidents Carr, Wells, Richmond, Woods, Sparks and Curris. He detailed the construction, use and change of buildings on campus, including Pogue Library, the Lowry Center, Waterfield Library, Wrather Museum, Wilson Hall, Lovett Auditorium, Carr Health, the Curris Center, Racer Arena, Old Fine Arts, Swan Hall, Wells Hall, Ordway Hall and the Faculty Clubhouse. He mentioned the role of Price Doyle in establishing the Department of Music. Bailey also recalled his campus involvement as a student at Murray State, including the marching band, singing in the choir and working at Pogue Library. He described the role of local women in operating boarding houses for students before dormitories were constructed and the establishment of the college farm. He discussed the Kentucky state legislature’s efforts and reasoning for establishing Murray State in the 1920s and the expansion of Murray State from a normal school. He explained the expansion of educational requirements for public school teachers in the 1960s and 1970s, which led teachers to return to college to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees. He recalled the quarter semester system and low enrollments at Murray State during the Second World War. He spoke of President Richmond’s role in securing grants for Federal Preflight and Naval training programs at Murray State during World War II. He remembered the ROTC program and anti-war rallies on Murray State’s campus during his time as a student during the Vietnam War and segregation during his childhood. He recounted the gradual desegregation of the town and the admission of African Americans to Murray State. He attributed the economic development of Murray and the surrounding area to the establishment of Murray State. He chronicled the history of churches in Murray during his lifetime and how Murray State impacted the local churches. He discussed the development of light industry in Calloway County, naming some of the most prominent factories and industrial employers in the area. He described the regional competition of towns in Western Kentucky over the bid for a state normal school and Rainey T. Wells’ role in winning the bid for Murray. He pointed out that the original part of Murray States’ campus was Wells’ farmland and Oakhurst, the president’s house, was Wells’ original home. He recalled the expansion of the city limits of Murray and Murray State’s role in the expansion. He largely ended the interview by describing the positive relations between Murray State and the town of Murray, which he attributes to the townspeople’s recognition of how Murray State has benefitted the area.
Descriptors: Murray State University -- History.
Interviewed by: Bolin, Wesley
Date of interview: 2013 March 27 and April 3
Contributed by: Murray State 100th Anniversary Oral History Project
Identification number: MSU001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Murray State 100th Anniversary - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Ernie R. (part 4)
Biographical note: Ernie R. Bailey was born in Murray, Kentucky on October 11, 1944. He began to attend Murray State Teacher Training School in Murray at the age of five. He graduated from the campus high school in 1962. He attended Murray State for four years and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English and History in 1966. While a student at Murray State, he worked in Pogue Library. After graduating from college, he taught for four years at Farmington High School in Graves County, Kentucky and one year at Murray High School. He attained his Master’s Degree in Education from Murray State in 1969. He attended summer sessions at George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee, where he obtained a Master in Library Science degree in 1973. In 1971, he obtained a fulltime position at Pogue Library, where he worked until his retirement in 2008. In 1977, he earned an Educational Specialist degree from George Peabody College. He later obtained a doctorate in Higher Education from Vanderbilt University in Nashville. As of April 2014, he resides in Murray with his wife, Dorothy Nell Bailey.
Description: Ernie Bailey began the interview with genealogical information on the Bailey family of Western Kentucky. He described the Murray Training School in Murray, Kentucky, including the building, the years of operation and its function as primary and secondary school. He mentioned his undergraduate and graduate career at Murray State College in the early 1960s and his teaching positions in Graves and Calloway Counties in Kentucky. He delved into how became employed at Forrest C. Pogue Library at Murray State. He chronicled the history of Murray State’s libraries, from the stage area of the auditorium at Murray Middle School to the contemporary Waterfield and Pogue libraries. He discussed the process of moving library collections between the various locations over time and the development of Special Collections and University Archives. He recalled the various uses of the floors and rooms of Pogue Library throughout its history. He also detailed the role of the Works Progress Administration in the construction of city streets in Murray, Cutchin Stadium and the cataloguing of local courthouse records. He named and described six of the presidents of Murray State, including Presidents Carr, Wells, Richmond, Woods, Sparks and Curris. He detailed the construction, use and change of buildings on campus, including Pogue Library, the Lowry Center, Waterfield Library, Wrather Museum, Wilson Hall, Lovett Auditorium, Carr Health, the Curris Center, Racer Arena, Old Fine Arts, Swan Hall, Wells Hall, Ordway Hall and the Faculty Clubhouse. He mentioned the role of Price Doyle in establishing the Department of Music. Bailey also recalled his campus involvement as a student at Murray State, including the marching band, singing in the choir and working at Pogue Library. He described the role of local women in operating boarding houses for students before dormitories were constructed and the establishment of the college farm. He discussed the Kentucky state legislature’s efforts and reasoning for establishing Murray State in the 1920s and the expansion of Murray State from a normal school. He explained the expansion of educational requirements for public school teachers in the 1960s and 1970s, which led teachers to return to college to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees. He recalled the quarter semester system and low enrollments at Murray State during the Second World War. He spoke of President Richmond’s role in securing grants for Federal Preflight and Naval training programs at Murray State during World War II. He remembered the ROTC program and anti-war rallies on Murray State’s campus during his time as a student during the Vietnam War and segregation during his childhood. He recounted the gradual desegregation of the town and the admission of African Americans to Murray State. He attributed the economic development of Murray and the surrounding area to the establishment of Murray State. He chronicled the history of churches in Murray during his lifetime and how Murray State impacted the local churches. He discussed the development of light industry in Calloway County, naming some of the most prominent factories and industrial employers in the area. He described the regional competition of towns in Western Kentucky over the bid for a state normal school and Rainey T. Wells’ role in winning the bid for Murray. He pointed out that the original part of Murray States’ campus was Wells’ farmland and Oakhurst, the president’s house, was Wells’ original home. He recalled the expansion of the city limits of Murray and Murray State’s role in the expansion. He largely ended the interview by describing the positive relations between Murray State and the town of Murray, which he attributes to the townspeople’s recognition of how Murray State has benefitted the area.
Descriptors: Murray State University -- History.
Interviewed by: Bolin, Wesley
Date of interview: 2013 March 27 and April 3
Contributed by: Murray State 100th Anniversary Oral History Project
Identification number: MSU001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Education & Desegregation - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Miller, Floy
Biographical note: Floy Miller was born on September 17, 1895 in Trigg County, Kentucky. She was the youngest of five children and was raised on her parents’ farm near Golden Pond in Trigg County. She began school before she turned 6 years old and attended at least four different schoolhouses. Since there was not a segregated high school within a reasonable distance of her home, she was not able to attend high school. After the eighth grade, she took the teacher’s examination in Cadiz, Kentucky and taught for one term on the certification she received. Between school terms, she attended a state teachers college in Bowling Green, Kentucky. After teaching, Miller decided to pursue a career in business and returned to Bowling Green to take college secretarial coursework. In December 1921, she was employed by the Swanson Electric Company in Evansville, Indiana. She later moved back to her home state and settled in Paducah, Kentucky. She remained in Paducah at least until the time of this interview in 1976. She never married. She died on August 16, 1986 in Ballard County, Kentucky and is buried at Paducah.
Description: Floy Miller began the interview with biographical information on herself and genealogical information on her parents. She continued to describe the crops and agricultural goods produced on her father’s farm. She described Uncle Jerry and Aunt Sally Sled, an African American couple that lived on the farm and worked for her father. She talked about her father’s brothers who lived in the area and their occupations. She mentioned forms of entertainment for the children, including possum hunting, games and community events. She provided details on the four elementary schoolhouses that she attended, including the school term and physical characteristics of the buildings. She discussed her experiences as a teacher in one-room schoolhouses in Trigg County, including the curriculum, discipline, practice of student recitations and where she boarded. She explained her reasons for ending her teaching career and subsequently taking up secretarial coursework in Bowling Green, Kentucky. In terms of the Land Between the Lakes area, she summarizes the overall demographics of the people while she was teaching, such as parents’ level of education and occupations. She recounted a story of the first wealthy family that bought a car in the area and the expansion of telephones into homes. She chronicled the steps of the long journey from her home in Trigg County to Bowling Green in order to arrive for the school term. She ended the interview with the story of the Night Riders burning a tobacco factory in Trigg County and shooting the African American on night watch.
Descriptors: Education -- Kentucky -- History.
Interviewed by: Sullivan, David
Date of interview: 29 June 1976
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH261
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.