B D E F K L M N P T W

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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 6)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses how the various New Deal Projects of the 1930s impacted Graves County, Kentucky. He describes voter turnout for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 and the introduction of the Civilian Works Administration (CWA), which was later replaced by the Public Works Administration (PWA). He details the construction of the Mayfield High School Annex, the Dublin School and the Graves County Courthouse Annex as government sponsored New Deal projects. He concludes the interview with a discussion on the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and their efforts to record burial locations of veterans, the writer’s projects, improvement of public roads and community recreational activities in Graves County.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1979 November 15, 1993 March 29, 1993 April 9 and 1993 April 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 11)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 2)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 5)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 8)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of the final speech given by Alben William Barkley and his eulogy given before Congress. The series includes the last speech delivered by Barkley on April 30, 1956 and the memorial service conducted in the United States Senate on May 3, 1956.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1956 April 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: McCuiston, Pat M. (part 2)
Biographical note: Pat M. McCuiston was born in Calloway County, Kentucky to a tenant farmer. In 1939, his family moved to Christian County. After graduating college he taught at Pembroke, Kentucky and later worked for Thomas Industries at Hopkinsville before finally entering into the business of banking. He was elected to the Kentucky State Senate from the Third District in 1968 and served until 1991.
Description: Pat M. McCuiston discusses Kentucky politics of the early 1970s. He begins with a short biography of his life and career prior to entering the Kentucky State Senate in 1968. He describes the economic makeup of his district and county redistricting in 1970. He reflects upon the major issues facing the 1974 Legislative Session, including the “No-Fault Insurance Bill” and “Multi-Bank Holding Companies”. He further describes the debate surrounding establishment of a Veterinary School at either Murray State University or the University of Kentucky. The interview concludes with McCuiston’s opinions on Governor Wendell H. Ford, western Kentucky coal and Democrat verses Republican ideologies in the State of Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH171
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 1, Part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of the State of Kentucky, discusses his political career up to 1974. He begins with his military service during the Second World War and formal education at the University of Kentucky. He recounts his service in the Kentucky State Legislature and the major issues he faced as a representative. He discusses his gubernatorial campaign and expresses his opinions on significant political figures in the state, such as Bert T. Combs, Wilson Wyatt, Happy Chandler and Earle C. Clements. He closes with the controversial topics he faced as governor and campaign strategies he used during his career.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 July 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 4)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 July 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1936 June 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1953
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 6)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1951-1958
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 1, Part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of the State of Kentucky, discusses his political career up to 1974. He begins with his military service during the Second World War and formal education at the University of Kentucky. He recounts his service in the Kentucky State Legislature and the major issues he faced as a representative. He discusses his gubernatorial campaign and expresses his opinions on significant political figures in the state, such as Bert T. Combs, Wilson Wyatt, Happy Chandler and Earle C. Clements. He closes with the controversial topics he faced as governor and campaign strategies he used during his career.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Munford, F. Tyler (part 2)
Biographical note: F. Tyler Munford came with his father to Morganfield, Kentucky to establish the Union County Advocate newspaper in 1924. He served in the Kentucky State House of Representatives from 1929 to 1939.
Description: F. Tyler Munford discusses his career in Kentucky politics and his professional relationship with Earle C. Clements. His interview offers an overview on the major political issues and events in Kentucky from the mid-1920s through the mid-1950s. He describes various legislative acts and decisions made by Clements while he was in the Kentucky State Legislature and serving as governor. Munford also provided information on party politics in Morganfield and Union County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH166
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cornett, John Chris (part 1)
Biographical note: John Chris Cornett was born in Florence, Indiana on August 6, 1910. He graduated from Knott County High School and attended Morehead State Teachers College (now Morehead State University), the University of Kentucky and the Cumberland Law School. He taught at public schools for twelve years before entering politics. From 1938 to 1940 he served as State Representative for Knott and Magoffin Counties. In 1941, he was elected County Judge for Knott County. Cornett was appointed Circuit Court Judge in 1950, a position which he held for over twenty years. He also served as State senator of the 29th District from 1972 to 1976. Cornett later served a second term as Circuit Court Judge from 1976 to 1984. He died on June 3, 1993 in Lexington, Kentucky.
Description: John Chris Cornett discusses the politics in the State of Kentucky from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. During the first half of the interview he examines the coal industry in Kentucky and reasons for running for political office which focused on the elections of judges. The second half covers his opinions on major legislation during his tenure as State senator, including the Cook Bill, Worker’s Compensation legislation and the Black Lung Bill. The interview concludes with a discussion on Governor Wendell H. Ford.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH162
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 4)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 2 part 1)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 3)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 4)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 08)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 2)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 03)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 5)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 August
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 6)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1955 August
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 7)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 6)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 5)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1949-1951
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the political landscape of Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s as well as the ideological differences that divided the State’s Democratic Party when he served as Governor. He recounts the specific qualities he sought when selecting individuals for governmental positions, his abolishment of the Kentucky Highway Patrol and the creation of the Kentucky State Police. He concludes with legislation enacted including road construction projects and the Taft-Hartley Act.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 09)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 1, Part 3)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of the State of Kentucky, discusses his political career up to 1974. He begins with his military service during the Second World War and formal education at the University of Kentucky. He recounts his service in the Kentucky State Legislature and the major issues he faced as a representative. He discusses his gubernatorial campaign and expresses his opinions on significant political figures in the state, such as Bert T. Combs, Wilson Wyatt, Happy Chandler and Earle C. Clements. He closes with the controversial topics he faced as governor and campaign strategies he used during his career.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 March 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career after his term as Governor. He lists the gubernatorial candidates he assisted and mentored and his impression of them. Nunn examines his failed United States Senate race in 1972 and his shortcomings that led to his loss. The session concludes with his describing his life after holding a major political office and the future of the Republican Party both in Kentucky and nationally.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 April 15
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of the final speech given by Alben William Barkley and his eulogy given before Congress. The series includes the last speech delivered by Barkley on April 30, 1956 and the memorial service conducted in the United States Senate on May 3, 1956.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1956 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1936 June 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 06)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 1 part 2)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part 4)
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 3, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of the final speech given by Alben William Barkley and his eulogy given before Congress. The series includes the last speech delivered by Barkley on April 30, 1956 and the memorial service conducted in the United States Senate on May 3, 1956.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1956 May 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 4)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 05)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cartwright, Carrol
Biographical note: Carrol Cartwright was born around 1900 in Morganfield, Kentucky. He attended high school in Morganfield but did not graduate. He joined the Odd Fellows Club in 1923. In 1932, he began his career at the Morganfield Post Office at Morganfield. He retired as the Assistant Post-Master in 1968.
Description: Carrol Cartwright discusses his lifelong friendship with Earle C. Clements. He recalls Clements’ involvement and position in the Odd Fellows Club and interest in sports. He concludes with his recollections of Morganfield, Kentucky during the 1920s and 1930s.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH164
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Timberlake, Clarence L. (part 1)
Biographical note: Clarence L. Timberlake was an African American activist who sought to improve and expand educational opportunities for black Kentuckians during the early and mid 20th Century. He was born in Fleming County, Kentucky in 1885. He graduated from Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Simmons University in 1930. Timberlake established a four year high school in Madisonville and teacher training schools at Pembroke and Greenville, Kentucky. He also organized Kentucky Negro Farmers Conferences from 1914 to 1948 and was president of West Kentucky Vocational School at Paducah from 1948 to 1957. He authored numerous pamphlets and articles on African American education, Kentucky politics and civil rights. He later was successful in sponsoring the first two black students from Kentucky to attend West Point Military Academy. He died in 1979.
Description: Clarence L. Timberlake discusses his life and interactions with Earle C. Clements. He discusses civil rights, public service and the Flood of 1937. He describes race relations in Kentucky from the 1920s to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. He offers an eyewitness account of the 27th Annual Convention of the National Negro Educational Conference in Kansas City, where he was elected vice president. Timberlake explains his role in the development of West Kentucky Vocational School and the Negro Farmers Association. The recording concludes with his opinions on the Roots mini-series and book.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 22 and 1977 April 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH167
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 6)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1951 December 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 3)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 6)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 7)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1941 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes four speeches: the first following the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor, one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1941 December 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 4)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 3)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Knuckles, Denver C. (part 1)
Biographical note: Denver C. Knuckles was born at Knuckles, Bell County, Kentucky in 1908. He graduated high school in Hazard, Kentucky in 1929. While attending high school he worked for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and following graduation worked for the Kentucky Utilities Company. Prior to the start of the Second World War he worked in Mayfield, Kentucky selling Life Insurance. In 1942 he joined the United States Marine Corp and fought at the Battle of Iwo Jima. After the war he returned to Bell County, Kentucky. In 1956 he was elected to the State Senate and in 1962 he was elected as a State Representative. He returned to the State Senate in 1972. He later served as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Teacher’s Retirement System of Kentucky. He died on May 1, 1988.
Description: State Senator Denver C. Knuckles provides details into his family history and Kentucky politics. He recounts his family history as far back as the American Civil War and the community of Knuckles in Bell County. He offers a brief account of his experiences prior to and during the Second World War. The remainder of the interview focuses on his election to the State legislature and the major issues of importance from the 1950s to the early 1970s. His discussion includes major political figures including governors Happy Chandler and Louie B. Nunn.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH170
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 12)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 07)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 3, part 2)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his time in the Kentucky State Legislature. The first interview begins with his entry into politics and his failed 1955 campaign for state legislature. His 1957 campaign for state legislator was successful. He describes significant legislation debated during his time in office, including the Egg Bill, the Keeneland Race Track Tax and the Community College System. He recalls the three governors he served under, Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs and Edward T. Breathitt. Barton provides his opinion on issues such as elected verses appointed State officials, the interstate and parkway system, the influence of lobbyists, strip mining, and Kentucky Education Television. He concludes with his opinions on why he left politics and returned to teaching.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1993 March 29 and 1993 April 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 1)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: McCuiston, Pat M. (part 1)
Biographical note: Pat M. McCuiston was born in Calloway County, Kentucky to a tenant farmer. In 1939, his family moved to Christian County. After graduating college he taught at Pembroke, Kentucky and later worked for Thomas Industries at Hopkinsville before finally entering into the business of banking. He was elected to the Kentucky State Senate from the Third District in 1968 and served until 1991.
Description: Pat M. McCuiston discusses Kentucky politics of the early 1970s. He begins with a short biography of his life and career prior to entering the Kentucky State Senate in 1968. He describes the economic makeup of his district and county redistricting in 1970. He reflects upon the major issues facing the 1974 Legislative Session, including the “No-Fault Insurance Bill” and “Multi-Bank Holding Companies”. He further describes the debate surrounding establishment of a Veterinary School at either Murray State University or the University of Kentucky. The interview concludes with McCuiston’s opinions on Governor Wendell H. Ford, western Kentucky coal and Democrat verses Republican ideologies in the State of Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH171
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part 1)
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses how the various New Deal Projects of the 1930s impacted Graves County, Kentucky. He describes voter turnout for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 and the introduction of the Civilian Works Administration (CWA), which was later replaced by the Public Works Administration (PWA). He details the construction of the Mayfield High School Annex, the Dublin School and the Graves County Courthouse Annex as government sponsored New Deal projects. He concludes the interview with a discussion on the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and their efforts to record burial locations of veterans, the writer’s projects, improvement of public roads and community recreational activities in Graves County.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra and Fulsom, Burt
Date of interview: 1979 November 15, 1993 March 29, 1993 April 9 and 1993 April 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 1)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barton, Lon Carter (Session 1)
Biographical note: Lon Carter Barton was born on September 18, 1925 in Mayfield, Kentucky. He attended Murray State College (presently Murray State University) and began teaching at Mayfield in 1947. In 1951, he was drafted into the Army and stationed at Indian Gap, Pennsylvania before being shipped to Korea. He was discharged in 1953 and returned to teaching before campaigning for the State legislature in 1957. He served as a State Representative in the Kentucky Legislature from 1958 until 1966. He returned to teaching in Mayfield the following year. He died at his home in Mayfield on March 28, 2006.
Description: Lon Carter Barton discusses his political career in the Kentucky State Legislature in the early 1960s. The interview begins with a biographical description of Barton’s life up to his time in the state legislature. He recounts his decision to enter politics and campaigning for office. He recalls the gubernatorial terms of Happy Chandler, Bert T. Combs, and Edward T. Breathitt and offers opinions upon their service to the state. He mentions constitutional amendments argued in the legislature and gives his opinions on future amendments to state constitution.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH174
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 9)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 3, part 3)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 01)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: McElroy, O.R.
Biographical note: O. R. McElroy was born about 1906. He attended Morganfield High School in the mid-1920s where he played football under Earl C. Clements.
Description: O. R. McElroy discusses playing football during the 1920s at Morganfield High School, Morganfield, Kentucky, under the coach Earl C. Clements. Clements later became a prominent politician serving as governor of Kentucky and as a United States Senator.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH177
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 3)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948-1955
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Bailey, Clay Wade (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Clay Wade Bailey was a journalist covering the Kentucky State Capital for forty-six years, mainly for the Covington Kentucky Post, the Lexington Herald, and the Evansville Press. He was born on September 22, 1905 in Little Sandy, Elliott County, Kentucky and was raised at the Masonic Widows and Orphans Home in Louisville. He attended Sue Bennett College in London, Kentucky. During his career journalism many politicians sought his insights and advise on the inner workings of State politics in Frankfort. He suffered a stroke in 1973 and died on February 19, 1974.
Description: Clay Wade Bailey discusses the inner working of government in the State of Kentucky from the 1920s to the early 1970s. He reflects upon the political careers of Earle C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Alben Barkley and other significant leaders in Kentucky. He describes key political issues, such as the sales tax, budget issues and the Clements’ Truck Scandal. He also mentions the campaigns of defeated gubernatorial candidates Harry Lee Waterfield and Henry Ward. The interviews conclude with his examination of the Governors and Lieutenant Governors from 1950 to 1971.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Landy, Marc
Date of interview: 1973 July, 1973 November 8, and 1974 January 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH173
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Knuckles, Denver C. (part 2)
Biographical note: Denver C. Knuckles was born at Knuckles, Bell County, Kentucky in 1908. He graduated high school in Hazard, Kentucky in 1929. While attending high school he worked for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and following graduation worked for the Kentucky Utilities Company. Prior to the start of the Second World War he worked in Mayfield, Kentucky selling Life Insurance. In 1942 he joined the United States Marine Corp and fought at the Battle of Iwo Jima. After the war he returned to Bell County, Kentucky. In 1956 he was elected to the State Senate and in 1962 he was elected as a State Representative. He returned to the State Senate in 1972. He later served as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Teacher’s Retirement System of Kentucky. He died on May 1, 1988.
Description: State Senator Denver C. Knuckles provides details into his family history and Kentucky politics. He recounts his family history as far back as the American Civil War and the community of Knuckles in Bell County. He offers a brief account of his experiences prior to and during the Second World War. The remainder of the interview focuses on his election to the State legislature and the major issues of importance from the 1950s to the early 1970s. His discussion includes major political figures including governors Happy Chandler and Louie B. Nunn.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH170
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 4, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the political landscape of Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s as well as the ideological differences that divided the State’s Democratic Party when he served as Governor. He recounts the specific qualities he sought when selecting individuals for governmental positions, his abolishment of the Kentucky Highway Patrol and the creation of the Kentucky State Police. He concludes with legislation enacted including road construction projects and the Taft-Hartley Act.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 November 15
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 1, part 5)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley during state and national political campaigns from 1936 to 1948. Included in the series are keynote speeches made before the 1936 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions, a speech at Paducah, Kentucky in 1948 following his election as Vice-President and a radio address during the Kentucky gubernatorial race in 1955 for Bert Combs.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1948 November 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Cornett, John Chris (part 2)
Biographical note: John Chris Cornett was born in Florence, Indiana on August 6, 1910. He graduated from Knott County High School and attended Morehead State Teachers College (now Morehead State University), the University of Kentucky and the Cumberland Law School. He taught at public schools for twelve years before entering politics. From 1938 to 1940 he served as State Representative for Knott and Magoffin Counties. In 1941, he was elected County Judge for Knott County. Cornett was appointed Circuit Court Judge in 1950, a position which he held for over twenty years. He also served as State senator of the 29th District from 1972 to 1976. Cornett later served a second term as Circuit Court Judge from 1976 to 1984. He died on June 3, 1993 in Lexington, Kentucky.
Description: John Chris Cornett discusses the politics in the State of Kentucky from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. During the first half of the interview he examines the coal industry in Kentucky and reasons for running for political office which focused on the elections of judges. The second half covers his opinions on major legislation during his tenure as State senator, including the Cook Bill, Worker’s Compensation legislation and the Black Lung Bill. The interview concludes with a discussion on Governor Wendell H. Ford.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH162
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 3)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 4)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1949
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 5)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series consists of speeches made by Alben William Barkley at various speaking engagements from 1944 to 1951 on the topic of the Second World War. The series includes three speeches: one given at the August 1944 commencement exercises at Bryant College (now Bryant University), Rhode Island on the aftermath of World War II, the second on the Marshall Plan delivered in August of 1948 at Paducah, Kentucky and the third at the tenth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the Punchbowl Cemetery in Oahu, Hawaii.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1944 August 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 1, part 2)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle Chester Clements discusses his life and career up through the 1970s. He details the genealogical history of the Clements family and their achievements in colonial America. He provides an overview of his political career and Kentucky’s statewide efforts to bring electric power to all its citizens. He concludes the interview by describing the years that followed his departure from the United States Senate.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 04)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his life and career prior to entering into Kentucky politics. He mentions his graduation from Morganfield High School in 1915, attending the University of Kentucky and enlistment in the National Guard during the First World War. He describes his experiences at Fort Benjamin Harrison near Lawrence, Indiana and being commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. He also recalls his military service at Camp Taylor near Louisville, Kentucky and the Lewis Institute (presently the Illinois Institute of Technology) in Chicago, Illinois.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 October 31
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 1 part 1)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 1, part 1)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle Chester Clements discusses his life and career up through the 1970s. He details the genealogical history of the Clements family and their achievements in colonial America. He provides an overview of his political career and Kentucky’s statewide efforts to bring electric power to all its citizens. He concludes the interview by describing the years that followed his departure from the United States Senate.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 July 29
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 1, part 7)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career as a member of Republican Party in the State of Kentucky. He discusses his education, legal practice and tenure as county judge for Barren County. He describes his political activities during local and state elections. Nunn further examines his campaign for the governorship and the major issues that separated Republican and Democratic parties in the state.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 September 25 – 1973 September 26
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Timberlake, Clarence L. (part 2)
Biographical note: Clarence L. Timberlake was an African American activist who sought to improve and expand educational opportunities for black Kentuckians during the early and mid 20th Century. He was born in Fleming County, Kentucky in 1885. He graduated from Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Simmons University in 1930. Timberlake established a four year high school in Madisonville and teacher training schools at Pembroke and Greenville, Kentucky. He also organized Kentucky Negro Farmers Conferences from 1914 to 1948 and was president of West Kentucky Vocational School at Paducah from 1948 to 1957. He authored numerous pamphlets and articles on African American education, Kentucky politics and civil rights. He later was successful in sponsoring the first two black students from Kentucky to attend West Point Military Academy. He died in 1979.
Description: Clarence L. Timberlake discusses his life and interactions with Earle C. Clements. He discusses civil rights, public service and the Flood of 1937. He describes race relations in Kentucky from the 1920s to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. He offers an eyewitness account of the 27th Annual Convention of the National Negro Educational Conference in Kansas City, where he was elected vice president. Timberlake explains his role in the development of West Kentucky Vocational School and the Negro Farmers Association. The recording concludes with his opinions on the Roots mini-series and book.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 22 and 1977 April 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH167
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Leary, Joseph J. (part 1)
Biographical note: Joseph J. Leary was an attorney who aided Earle C. Clements in his 1947 gubernatorial campaign. He was also a delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Kentucky in 1956.
Description: Joseph J. Leary discusses Earle C. Clements’ gubernatorial campaign in 1947 and provides some minor details into Clements’ tenure as Governor of Kentucky. He details his first meeting with Clements and the role he played in Clements’ gubernatorial campaign. He describes major political issues faced by Clements, including a Veterinary School to Kentucky, strip mining for coal, special interests groups and the Kentucky State Judiciary Building scandal. The interview concludes with Leary discussing why Clements chose Lawrence Weatherby to run as his Lieutenant Governor.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH175
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Barkley, Alben William (Series 4, part 2)
Biographical note: Alben William Barkley was a United States Representative, Senator and Vice President. He was born near Lowes, Graves County, Kentucky on November 24, 1877. He attended public schools and graduated from Marvin College in Clinton, Kentucky. He later attended Emory College and the University of Virginia where he received a degree in law. He began the practice of law in Paducah in 1901. He was elected county prosecutor for McCracken County in 1905 and judge of the county court in 1909. In 1913, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives and was reelected six successive times. Barkley was elected to the United States Senate in 1926 and held that office until he was elected Vice President under Harry S. Truman in 1948. After a single term as Vice President he returned to the Senate where he served until his death on April 30, 1956.
Description: Series contains various recordings related to Alben William Barkley and other members of his family between 1939 and 1958. Recordings include excerpts from interviews with Sidney Shalett, radio campaign advertisements, memorial songs, short speeches and miscellaneous statements made by Barkley and family members.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Speeches
Date of interview: 1939-1948
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH190
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Leary, Joseph J. (part 2)
Biographical note: Joseph J. Leary was an attorney who aided Earle C. Clements in his 1947 gubernatorial campaign. He was also a delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Kentucky in 1956.
Description: Joseph J. Leary discusses Earle C. Clements’ gubernatorial campaign in 1947 and provides some minor details into Clements’ tenure as Governor of Kentucky. He details his first meeting with Clements and the role he played in Clements’ gubernatorial campaign. He describes major political issues faced by Clements, including a Veterinary School to Kentucky, strip mining for coal, special interests groups and the Kentucky State Judiciary Building scandal. The interview concludes with Leary discussing why Clements chose Lawrence Weatherby to run as his Lieutenant Governor.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 8
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH175
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 10)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 5)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 2, part 6)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his term as Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. He examines the issues he faced as Governor including the State Merit System, the public universities and colleges, budgets issues and legalized gambling. The major events of his governorship include the Louisville Race Riots of 1968 and student riots on the University of Kentucky campus in 1970. He also discusses various individuals he met during his tenure in office, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Thelma Stovall, Wendell Butler, Jim Thornton, Margaret Willis, Jim Watson, Fred Karim and Dr. Singletary.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 23
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 3, part 02)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses the end of his military service in the United States National Guard and the early years of his political career in Kentucky. He recalls teaching military studies at Peru State Teachers College (now Peru State College) and Davenport Island High School, Iowa and mentions his discharge from the army at Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1919. He describes his career as a “wildcat” oil driller in Ranger, Texas and his return to Morganfield, where he coached football at the local high school from 1921 to 1929. He details his father’s election as sheriff of Union County and his appointment as deputy sheriff in 1921. He recalls his appointment to sheriff following his father’s death in 1922, his election as county court clerk in 1926 and county judge in 1934. He discusses his tenure as State Senator from 1941 to 1944, United States Representative from 1944 to 1948 and Governor of Kentucky from 1947 to 1950. He further explained the major policies, issues and legislation that dominated State politics during his years in office. He also offers his opinions on significant political figures in Kentucky, including John Sires, Thomas Rhea, Harry Lee Waterfield, Frederick A. Wallis, Lee Gibson, Alben W. Barkley, Keen Johnson, Simeon S. Willis, Beverly M. Vincent, Jim Diskin, and Tom Underwood.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1975 January 24 – 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 2, part 2)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 3)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part )
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Munford, F. Tyler (part 1)
Biographical note: F. Tyler Munford came with his father to Morganfield, Kentucky to establish the Union County Advocate newspaper in 1924. He served in the Kentucky State House of Representatives from 1929 to 1939.
Description: F. Tyler Munford discusses his career in Kentucky politics and his professional relationship with Earle C. Clements. His interview offers an overview on the major political issues and events in Kentucky from the mid-1920s through the mid-1950s. He describes various legislative acts and decisions made by Clements while he was in the Kentucky State Legislature and serving as governor. Munford also provided information on party politics in Morganfield and Union County, Kentucky.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH166
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Freeman, Wayne W. (Session 2 part 2)
Biographical note: Wayne W. Freeman served as the Kentucky state senator from the First District from 1951 to 1967 and as state representative for Graves County from 1936 to 1940. Freeman was born on December 25, 1912 near Symsonia, Kentucky. He graduated of Symsonia High School in 1933 and a received a bachelor’s degree in education from Murray State Teachers College (Murray State University) in 1936. He later attended Georgetown University Law School and the Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville). He began practicing law in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1948. Freeman also served three terms as railroad commissioner and served as a delegate to the 1960 and 1968 Democratic National conventions. He died at age 83 in Mayfield in 1993.
Description: Wayne W. Freeman discusses his upbringing in western Kentucky and his career in politics during the 1940s and 1950s. Freeman recounts his time at Murray State Teacher’s College in the 1930s and his involvement in student government and local politics. He describes his election to the Kentucky State Legislature in 1940 and state politics during the Second World War. He further offers his opinions on prominent political figures including Alben Barkley, Happy Chandler, Harry Lee Waterfield, and Earle C. Clements. Freeman also recalls the significant political issues of the era such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, state income tax, and the Keeneland Racetrack at Lexington.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1992 January 29 and 1992 February 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH172
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Prichard, Edward Fretwell (Session 2, part 1)
Biographical note: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. was born on January 21, 1915 in Paris, Kentucky. He entered Princeton University at the age of 15 and after graduation attended Harvard Law School. While at Harvard, Prichard served as a research assistant to Felix Frankfurter and followed him to Washington, D.C. upon his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1938. In Washington, Prichard served with the Immigration Service as an assistant to the United States Attorney General. He also served on the War Production Board as legal counsel and advisor for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky to practice law. Three years later he was convicted of voter fraud in a county election and sentenced to federal prison, but was pardoned by President Harry S. Truman in 1950. Throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s Prichard served as an advisor to several Kentucky governors. In 1966, he was appointed to the Kentucky Council on Higher Education, which after 1981 was renamed the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. He died on December 23, 1984.
Description: Edward Fretwell Prichard, Jr. recounts his life in Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He discusses working in Washington, D. C. before and during the Second World War. He describes life in Paris, Kentucky, the politics of the region and his great admiration for Woodrow Wilson. He examines his college years at Princeton University and Harvard Law School where he met his mentor, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter. Prichard recalls his time in the nation’s capital from 1938 to 1945, including his work at the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department, the Office of Production Management, War Production Board, War Labor Board and the Office of Economic Stabilization. The interview concludes with his return to Bourbon County in 1945 and his conviction in 1948 for voter fraud
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Venza, J. Riley
Date of interview: 1976 November 1, 1976 December 7, 1977 April 19 and a date unknown.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH178
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Nunn, Louie B. (Session 3, part 1)
Biographical note: Louie Broady Nunn was born on March 8, 1924 in Barren County, Kentucky. He attended Hiseville High School where he graduated in 1941. He attended Bowling Green Business University and prior to entering the United States Army attended Tri-State Aviation School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He enlisted in the infantry after attempts to join the Army Air Corps failed. After the war, he pursued a pre-law degree from the University of Cincinnati and in 1950 graduated with a degree in law from the University of Louisville. Nunn opened a law firm in Glasgow and became active in politics. He was elected Barren County Judge on the Republican ticket in 1953 and as governor in 1967. He was a campaign manger during the presidential campaigns of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. In 1974 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and for Governor in 1979. He was met with defeated in both elections. He died on January 29, 2004.
Description: Louie Broady Nunn discusses his political career after his term as Governor. He lists the gubernatorial candidates he assisted and mentored and his impression of them. Nunn examines his failed United States Senate race in 1972 and his shortcomings that led to his loss. The session concludes with his describing his life after holding a major political office and the future of the Republican Party both in Kentucky and nationally.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 April 15
Contributed by: Forrest C. Pogue Oral History Program.
Identification number: OH168
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Waterfield, Harry Lee (part 3)
Biographical note: Harry Lee Waterfield was Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1955 to 1959 and 1963 to 1967. He was born at Tobacco, Calloway County, Kentucky on January 19, 1911. He attended local public schools and graduated from Murray State Teachers College in 1932. After graduation he entered into the newspaper business at La Center, Kentucky and later purchased the Carlisle County News, the Fulton Daily Ledger and the Hickman County Gazette. He served six terms in the Kentucky State Legislature from 1938 to 1952 and was Speaker of the House from 1944 to 1948. Waterfield campaigned for governor in 1947 but was defeated. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention six times from 1944 to 1968. From 1969 to 1973, he served on the Board of Regents for Murray State University. He later was president of the National Investors Life Insurance Company. He died on August 4, 1988.
Description: Harry Lee Waterfield discusses his experiences in the Jackson Purchase area of western Kentucky from the 1920s to the 1970s. He describes his family history and residing in Tobacco and Murray, Kentucky. He recalls the political groundwork that led to the Normal School (currently Murray State University) to be established at Murray in 1922. He also reflects upon his early years as a student at Murray State from 1929 to 1932. He recounts entering into the newspaper business following graduation and the close relationship that he held with local politicians. He mentions his entry into politics in 1937 and his tenure in the state legislature from 1938 to 1952.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH176
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 2)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Lindo, William H.
Biographical note: William H. Lindo was born about 1892 in Morganfield, Kentucky. He joined the Masonic Lodge in 1917. He was drafted for military service during the First World War but was declared exempt after failing the Army physical.
Description: William H. Lindo discusses his friendship with Earle C. Clements when they resided in Morganfield, Kentucky during the first half of the 20th century. He details Clements’ football coaching career at Morganfield High School and his early political career in Union County. He provides a description of Morganfield and Union County during the Great Depression.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH165
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
View the MP3 document
Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Breathitt, Edward T., Jr. (Session 2, Part 5)
Biographical note: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr. was born on November 26, 1924 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He graduated from Hopkinsville High School in 1942 and briefly attended the University of Kentucky pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Commerce before entering the Army Air Corps later that year. Throughout the most of the Second World War Breathitt trained as a pilot and in 1945 was discharged with the rank of Aviation Cadet. He returned to the University of Kentucky and completed his degree before entering the university’s law school where he acquired a law degree in 1950. In 1950, he opened a law firm in Hopkinsville and was elected to the Kentucky Legislature the following year. In 1963, Breathitt was elected governor of Kentucky and served until 1967. Following his term as governor, he returned to his Hopkinsville law firm and served as lawyer for the Southern Railway and later Norfolk Southern Corporation from 1967 until his retirement in 1992. He also served on the Board of Regents for Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, and University of Kentucky. He died on October 14, 2003.
Description: Edward Thompson Breathitt, Jr., former governor of Kentucky, discusses his family history and political career. He begins the interview by recounting the genealogy of Breathitt family and their influence on the development of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He offers his opinion on political figures Happy Chandler and Alben Barkley. He describes his childhood experiences prior to and during the Great Depression. The second series of interviews cover primarily Breathitt’s early political and law career. He further discusses significant figures on Kentucky politic and concludes with his opinions on the office of lieutenant governor, State workers contracts and the merit system.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1988 March 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH169
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Buchanan, Ross
Biographical note: Ross Buchanan was born about 1896 and attended public schools in Union County, Kentucky. He attended Morganfield High School and played on the varsity football team. In 1918, he enlisted in the United States Army and was discharge after the conclusion of the First World War in 1919.
Description: Ross Buchanan discusses growing up in Union County, Kentucky during the early half of the 20th century. He describes his close friendship with Earle C. Clements and the impact he had on Clements’ career in politics.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1973 October 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH163
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Clements, Earle C. (Session 5, part 4)
Biographical note: Earle Chester Clements was born in Morganfield, Kentucky on October 22, 1896. He briefly attended the University of Kentucky before serving in the United States Army during the First World War. After returning from the war, he worked in the oil fields of Texas for a few years before returning to Morganfield to farm and coach football at the local high school. He served as Union County sheriff from 1922 to 1926, county clerk from 1926 to 1934 and county judge from 1934 to 1942. Clements was elected to state Senate in 1941 and in 1944 became majority leader. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 to 1948 and was elected governor of Kentucky in 1947. He resigned in 1950 to run for the United States Senate. He won the election and served in the Senate from 1950 to 1957. From 1959 to 1960, he acted as state highway commissioner. Clements also worked as a lobbyist in Washington, D.C. and held several executive positions with the American Tobacco Institute. He retired to Morganfield in 1981 and died on March 12, 1985.
Description: Earle C. Clements discusses his career in politics in the late 1940s and 1950s. He examines legislation during his time in the United States Senate. He recounts his opinions on the European Recovery Program (also know as the Marshall Plan), dependency on Foreign Trade, legislation related to agriculture and rise and fall of McCarthyism. He discusses his personal experiences with Senators Eugene D. Millikin, Walter F. George, Edwin C. Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, Millard Tydings, and Richard Russell, Jr.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1976 November 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH160
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: Politics and Government - Oral History
Name of person interviewed: Ward, Henry Thomas (part 4)
Biographical note: Henry Ward was born on June 20, 1909 at New Hope, Kentucky. He attended public schools and graduated from Tilghman High School in Paducah in 1928. After graduation Ward began writing for the Paducah Sun Democrat and later became city editor of the newspaper. He entered politics in 1934 and served five consecutive terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. He became House Majority Leader in 1942. He campaigned for the Democratic Party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 1943 but lost in the primary. In 1945 he was elected to the Kentucky Senate. Five years later, Ward became Commissioner of Conservation and was instrumental in expanding the State’s park system. In 1956 he became the top aide for Senator Earle Clements and four years later became Commissioner of the Highway Department. He ran for governor in 1967 but lost by a slim margin to Louie B. Nunn. He returned to Paducah after the election and served as the publisher of the Paducah Sun Democrat until his retirement in 1974. He died on October 8, 2002.
Description: Henry Ward discusses his political career and public service in the State of Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1970s. He describes his work with significant Kentucky politicians including Earl C. Clements, Happy Chandler, Lawrence Weatherby, and Keen Johnson. He discusses his Kentucky gubernatorial campaign and defeat in 1967 and his career as highway commissioner. Throughout his recollections he recounts upon major decisions and legislation he partook in and the political wrangling surrounding those issues.
Descriptors: Kentucky -- Politics and government.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1974 February 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH161
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.