B D E F K L M N P T W

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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Crouch, Fleetwood
Biographical note: Fleetwood Crouch was born in Calloway County, Kentucky. He trained at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Following basic training he was ordered to France but did not see combat.
Description: Fleetwood Crouch was born in Calloway County, Kentucky. He was drafted and was sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Crouch spoke about his experiences at the camp and conditions in the camp. He mentions being in France but never seeing combat. He recalls the many changes at home when he returned and how prices increased. His also discussed his life as a farmer in Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 September 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH006
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hunt, Johnson
Biographical note: Johnson Hunt, a resident of Mayfield, Kentucky, was ordered to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky for basic training and then sent to a military camp located in South Carolina for specialized training. There he became a member of the First Pioneer Infantry. Hunt was ordered to New Jersey and transported to Brest, France. The war had ended prior to his arrival in Europe. He returned to Camp Taylor to be discharged from the service.
Description: Johnson Hunt, a World War I veteran, discusses his wartime experiences. Hunt was 27 years old when he was drafted in the United States Army in 1918. He received basic training at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Hunt belonged to the First Pioneer Infantry. Other topics discussed include; camp life; trips overseas; being on three different fronts during the war; contact with German prisoners; gas attacks; morale on the fronts; repairing roads; reaction of the men when the armistice was signed; being a member of the occupational forces in Germany; race relations; and the return home following the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH017
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Waldrop, H. T. (Part 1)
Biographical note: H. T. Waldrop was a resident of Murray, Kentucky. He served in the United States Navy for two years during the war but never saw overseas duty. He served at Newport, Rhode Island.
Description: H. T. Waldrop discusses his duties in the United States Navy during World War I. He served for two years and was in charge of managing a naval recreation center at Covington Point in Newport, Rhode Island. When he returned from the war he held many jobs including postmaster and oil well driller.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Wigginton, Melinda A. and Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 October 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH026
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Milam, Carl (Part 1)
Biographical note: Carl Milam was a resident of Tennessee. His basic training was in Dresden, Tennessee and later to Knoxville. He was ordered to Jacksonville, Florida for training in motor transport. Milam then traveled to New York to board a ship to travel to Brest, France.
Description: Carl Milam recalls his experiences during World War I. He offers general background information and shares his thoughts regarding the war. He mentions his basic training and reluctance to go to war. Other topics discussed include: his reaction to President Woodrow Wilson’s declaration of war; his trip overseas; impressions of the French people; camp conditions, troop morale; his attitude toward the Armistice; the return trip to the United States; receiving his discharge; contact with other veterans; the justification of the war; race relations overseas and the rewards of army life.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 October 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH022
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Old, Clell Cecil (Part 1)
Biographical note: Clell Cecil Old was born on June 27, 1894 in Nashville, Tennessee. He was drafted into the United States Army when he resided in Henry County, Tennessee. He trained at Camp Gordon in Atlanta, Georgia then at the Civil War battlefield at Chickamauga, Georgia. He left from New York to go to Brest, France on April 6, 1918. He traveled aboard the U.S.S Covington. Old was wounded in Argonne Forest and later received a Purple Heart.
Description: Clell Cecil Old, a World War I veteran, discusses his service in the United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment, from 1917 and 1918. He was wounded in Argonne Forest in October of 1918. He received a Purple Heart for his wound in May of 1980.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pritchard, Peggy
Date of interview: 1985 September 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH029
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Miller, Buster
Biographical note: Buster Miller was born in Milliton, Tennessee. He was drafted into the United States Army and was assigned to Company D of the 35th Engineer Service. He was first sent to [Camp Doniphan] then to New York. He sailed on a transport in a large convoy to Brest, France. Miller returned home on the H.M.C.S. St. Claire and discharged at Camp Shelby in Mississippi.
Description: Buster Miller discusses his activities before, during and after the First World War. Before the war, he worked for his father in the cotton industry. He describes his training and assignments, the military bases he trained at and being transported overseas to Brest, France. He reflects upon the treatment of black soldiers and his recollections of a typical day in the armed services. He also recalls the time he spent in Germany. After the war, he returned home on the H.M.C.S. St. Claire. He mentioned how he was treated following his returned home, his employment prospects and family life. In closing, he discusses his church affiliation and his pension from the United States government.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH023
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ginges, Hugh
Biographical note: Hugh Gingles was a farmer from Kirksey, Kentucky. He was drafted and sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky for basic training. He served in the Depot Brigade at Camp Taylor for the duration of the First World War. Following the war, he was sent to Camp Pike near Little Rock, Arkansas.
Description: Hugh Gingles discusses his experiences during the World War I. Prior to the war he was a farmer at Kirksey, Kentucky. He recalls how he was among the first to be drafted and how he decided it to be a just war. Other topics discussed in the interview include: the recruitment of several Jackson Purchase residents on the way to Camp Taylor in Louisville, the insufficiency and deficiencies of the new camps, being in the Depot Brigade, serving as a non-commission officer and attending training school, the different types of people in his company; the feelings of other people towards the war; the flu epidemic; the first big snow during the war and how things had changed when he returned from the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 September 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH011
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Caldwell, Frank (Part 2)
Biographical note: Frank Caldwell was born in 1896 in McCracken County, Kentucky. His father, Chris Caldwell, was a share cropper in Ballard County, Kentucky. He was drafted into the service on July 29, 1919. He went to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was one of the first in the 801 Division. He went from Camp Taylor to New Jersey then on to New York. He later boarded a ship that landed in Brest, France.
Description: Frank Caldwell discusses his experiences during the First World War. He describes basic training camps, the condition of France and the French people during the war and the outbreak of spinal meningitis. Caldwell mentions the feelings toward Americans at home and his feelings after the war. He also describes the flood of Paducah, Kentucky in 1937.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH003
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cox, Noble
Biographical note: Noble Cox was born December 4, 1896 in Kirksey, Kentucky. He grew up on the family farm southwest of Kirksey. He moved to Wingo, Kentucky where he attended high school. He later moved to Detroit, Michigan for a brief time to seek employment.
Description: Noble Cox enlisted in the United States Navy at age 21. He was sent to Newport, Rhode Island for his basic training where he remained throughout the First World War. Cox studied to be a naval nurse and worked in the main hospital during the flu epidemic of 1918 and 1919. He was in the United States Navy from April 6, 1918 to November 20, 1919.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 October 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH005
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Davis, William G.
Biographical note: William G. Davis was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1892. His parents were John Henry and Minnie Davis. He moved to Paducah, Kentucky when he left the tobacco business. Davis was drafted into the army and received basic training at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was present at Camp Murray in New Jersey during the race riot. He was in the 369th Infantry Regiment of the old 15th New York Regiment while in France Following the war he attended a bible school in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
Description: William G. Davis recollects about how he started in the tobacco business when he was young man. He discusses the First World War and the part he played in the conflict. He spoke about different travels within and outside of the United States. He explains how he entered the ministry and the decisions he made to become a minister. He also spoke about the discrimination he experienced.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH008
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hainline, Carl
Biographical note: Carl Hainline was drafted into the United States Army in 1918. He was working as a mechanic in Kansas City, Missouri. He was sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky and then to Camp Sherman in Iowa. He was assigned to the 158th Field Artillery Brigade. He was sent to Hoboken, New Jersey to board a ship going to Liverpool, England then on to France. When the armistice was signed he was sent to Germany.
Description: Carl Hainline, a resident of Fulton, Kentucky, discusses his World War I experiences. The topics discussed include: his general feelings about the war in Europe; feelings about President Woodrow Wilson and the United States entrance into the War; enlistment and military unit information; basic training camps; his trip overseas; morale of the solders; warfare and casualties; entertainment; receiving mail; the role of occupational forces in Germany during the post war period; returning home and seeking employment; contact with service friends and the black troops that were overseas.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH012
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Basham, Sam
Biographical note: Sam Basham was a resident of Mayfield, Kentucky who served in the United States Army during the First World War. After enlistment he took basic training at Camp Gordon near Atlanta, Georgia. Following basic training, he was transferred to Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont. He was discharged from the army at Fort Ayers, Massachusetts on December 11, 1918. .
Description: Sam Basham, a resident of Mayfield, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in the United States Army during the First World War. Basham describes life as a soldier on the home front. The topics discussed include camp life, basic training, relationships between officers and enlisted men and post war issues.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH001
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: James, Arthur
Biographical note: Arthur James lived in Barlow, Kentucky before he enlisted in the United States Army. James was stationed first at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis Missouri then on to [Camp Merritt, Cantonment] in New Jersey for basic training. He was in the medical corps, Ambulance Company No. 8, 68th Division. When basic training was concluded he boarded the ship U.S.S. Kilpatrick in Hoboken, New Jersey and headed to Carzelle, Panama. Following the war he was stationed at Camp Shelby in Hattiesburg, Mississippi then was discharged at Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Description: Arthur James, a resident of Barlow, Kentucky, discusses his experiences during the First World War. Included in the interview are his feelings about the war, his training to be in the ambulance service, the differences in military camps and the changes that occurred following the war. He explains why he served in Panama rather than in Europe. He also discusses the type of work he did after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1983 June 30
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH018
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Carmon, Andrew
Biographical note: Andrew Carmon was born on March 20, 1895 and was lifelong resident of Mayfield, Kentucky. He was drafted while living in Louisville, Kentucky and went to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He traveled by ship from Newport News, Virginia to Breast, France where he was a member of the 801st Infantry Regiment until he was reassigned to the 369th Infantry Regiment of the 93rd division which was one of only three African American regiments to witness combat in the First World War. In France, he was reassigned to a French division that allowed African Americans in combat. He was in Alsace Lorraine when the armistice was announced via leaflets dropped from planes.
Description: Andrew Carmon discusses his family background, basic training and transport ships being attacked by German submarines en route to France. He spoke of being one of the few black men in combat and how the different races related to one another. He also discussed what it was like in the trenches in France and being on the front line. He was wounded in France, recovered and ordered go back to the front.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 October 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH004
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hornbeak, Paul
Biographical note: Paul Hornbeak was born in Tennessee and went to school in Nashville. He attended basic training at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky.
Description: Paul Hornbeak, a 94 year old veteran of both World Wars, discusses his wartime experiences in the First World War. He served with a company of bakers during the war and worked with his brother as a businessman between the wars.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 November 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH016
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Metzger, Fritz
Biographical note: Fritz Metzger was a resident of Paducah, Kentucky before he was drafted into the war. He trained first at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky then on to Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was ordered overseas and landed in Brest, France. He was sent to the front lines at Vallendar, Germany. He saw combat at the Battle at Belleau Wood. Metzger returned to Paducah after he received his discharge and worked for his father in the meat business.
Description: Fritz Metzger discusses his World War I experiences. He was twenty one years old when he was drafted into an infantry unit of the 2nd Division of the United States Army. He trained at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky and later at Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas. Metzger recollects the living conditions and moral of American troops on the Western Front and describes his combat experiences. He mentions contact with German troops and serving in the occupational forces in Germany when the war concluded. He offers details on the reaction of people of the signing of the Armistice. Metzger also explains why he thought the war was just, some of the benefits he received from the war and key incidents which stood out most in his mind during the war, including the battle at Belleau Wood.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 December 3
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH021
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Flowers, Jesse P.
Biographical note: Jesses Flowers was drafted in 1918 and sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison in Lawrence, Indiana and later to Camp Mills in New York from there he sailed from New Jersey to Brest, France.
Description: Jesse Flowers discusses his experiences during World War I. He was working for the Illinois Central Railroad Company when the war broke out. He mentions the training camps, feelings toward President Woodrow Wilson, the trip overseas, belonging to the 22nd Engineer Regiment, his military duties, the front lines, reconstruction after the war, contact with both French and German soldiers, relationships between officers and enlisted men and the way his fellow soldiers felt about the war. Flowers also recalled the trip back to the United States and the changes he witnessed after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 6
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH010
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ham, John E.
Biographical note: John E. Pike was a canteen manager at Camp Pike in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was later stationed at Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. When the Armistice was signed Pike returned to Paducah, Kentucky, where he spent the remainder of his life.
Description: John E. Ham, a World War I veteran, discuses his wartime activities. He describes basic training and relays humorous stories relating to camp life. He mentions camp conditions, morale, furloughs, visits home, recreation and entertainment, and his activities in Little Rock, Arkansas as a canteen manager. Ham offers his impressions of the war from his perspective and the reactions to the armistice. He also discusses the 1920’s, the justification for the war, the importance of newspapers during the war and his contacts with fellow World War I veterans.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH013
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Butler, Hughie (part 2)
Biographical note: Hughie Butler was a resident of Fulton, Kentucky who served in the United States Navy during the First World War. He was inducted into the Navy at age 18 on May 5, 1918. He attended basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station near Chicago, Illinois. He was transferred from one camp to another before he was stationed at Camp Ross at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. He then took a train from New York to New Jersey to board the ship U.S.S. Leviathan to go to Brest, France. A train took him to Trompeloup, France where they were building a naval air station. He worked in the medical corps in the Pulliac region of France. He returned aboard the U.S.S. Imperitor.
Description: Hughie Butler, a resident of Fulton, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in the United States Navy during the First World War. Included in the discussion are such topics as basic training, overseas travel, the 1918 flu epidemic, and the everyday life of a sailor during the war. Mr. Butler also describes the attitudes the French people toward American soldiers and cultural change on the home front following the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 October 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH002
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Butler, Hughie (part 1)
Biographical note: Hughie Butler was a resident of Fulton, Kentucky who served in the United States Navy during the First World War. He was inducted into the Navy at age 18 on May 5, 1918. He attended basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station near Chicago, Illinois. He was transferred from one camp to another before he was stationed at Camp Ross at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. He then took a train from New York to New Jersey to board the ship U.S.S. Leviathan to go to Brest, France. A train took him to Trompeloup, France where they were building a naval air station. He worked in the medical corps in the Pulliac region of France. He returned aboard the U.S.S. Imperitor.
Description: Hughie Butler, a resident of Fulton, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in the United States Navy during the First World War. Included in the discussion are such topics as basic training, overseas travel, the 1918 flu epidemic, and the everyday life of a sailor during the war. Mr. Butler also describes the attitudes the French people toward American soldiers and cultural change on the home front following the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 October 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH002
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Old, Clell Cecil (Part 2)
Biographical note: Clell Cecil Old was born on June 27, 1894 in Nashville, Tennessee. He was drafted into the United States Army when he resided in Henry County, Tennessee. He trained at Camp Gordon in Atlanta, Georgia then at the Civil War battlefield at Chickamauga, Georgia. He left from New York to go to Brest, France on April 6, 1918. He traveled aboard the U.S.S Covington. Old was wounded in Argonne Forest and later received a Purple Heart.
Description: Clell Cecil Old, a World War I veteran, discusses his service in the United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment, from 1917 and 1918. He was wounded in Argonne Forest in October of 1918. He received a Purple Heart for his wound in May of 1980.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pritchard, Peggy
Date of interview: 1985 September 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH029
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hendon, Cassie
Biographical note: Cassie Hendon was born in Calloway County. She lived on State Line Road. She married Rubert Richard Hendon on December 13, 1917. She followed her husband to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky where he enlisted.
Description: Cassie Hendon discusses her experiences as a solder’s wife during the First World War. She mentions general information about her family, education, occupation, and her marriage. Hendon tells how she first heard about the war and her feelings when her husband enlisted. She explained how it was to be a young bride living near her husband at Camp Taylor, Kentucky. She also discussed such things as the amount of contact she had with her husband, entertainment during the war, rationing, involvement in war activities, the community’s reaction to the war, and race relations in the community. Hendon speaks about the effects of the war on women and concludes by giving her and her husbands reflections on the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Wigginton, Melinda A.
Date of interview: 1983 April 12
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH015
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Williams, Dewey (Part 1)
Biographical note: Dewey Williams was born on July 26, 1899 in Tennessee but grew up in Hazel, Kentucky. He enlisted in the United States Army when he was seventeen. He trained at Salem, New Jersey. He was transported to France where he received more military training and then was stationed in Liverpool, England for the duration of the war. Following the war, he relocated to Arkansas for employment. During the Great Depression, he moved to Detroit, Michigan. He returned to Hazel, Kentucky in 1940.
Description: Dewey Williams, a resident of Hazel, Kentucky, discusses his experiences during World War I and the Great Depression. He recalls the military training he received, the Armistice, being “shell shocked”, the loss of life caused by carelessness with weapons and his return back to the United States. He also discusses the effects of the Great Depression, searching for employment in Detroit and his job making railroad ties.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 September 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH028
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Coffman, Ellwyn
Biographical note: Ellwyn Coffman was a resident of Fulton, Kentucky. He was attending college in Bowling Green, Kentucky when the war broke out. He traveled to Louisville, Kentucky to enlist in the army. He was first stationed at Fort Thomas, Kentucky where he was put to work in the bakery. His basic training was in Fort Riley, Kansas. He was sent to Camp Merritt, New Jersey before he was transported overseas to Brest, France. He was discharged from the army and return on the U.S.S. Mount Vernon.
Description: Ellwyn Coffman discusses his many diverse experiences and adventures in the United States Army during the First World War. Included in the interview are a personal glimpse of the European culture and humorous anecdotes as told from an American perspective. Included in the interview are his different experiences in the Jackson Purchase Area and his international seed business.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH007
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Waldrop, H. T. (Part 2)
Biographical note: H. T. Waldrop was a resident of Murray, Kentucky. He served in the United States Navy for two years during the war but never saw overseas duty. He served at Newport, Rhode Island.
Description: H. T. Waldrop discusses his duties in the United States Navy during World War I. He served for two years and was in charge of managing a naval recreation center at Covington Point in Newport, Rhode Island. When he returned from the war he held many jobs including postmaster and oil well driller.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Wigginton, Melinda A. and Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1983 May 1
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH026
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Yates, Nathan Tubb
Biographical note: Nathan Yates was a resident of Fulton County, Kentucky. He volunteered for the United States Navy. He was stationed at San Diego, California and remained there for the duration of his navy career.
Description: Nathan Tubb Yates served in the United States Naval Reserve during the First World War. He was stationed in San Diego, California and remained there through duration of the war. He discusses his military duties, the rivalry between the army and navy units and a football game between the two military branches that broke out into a heated brawl.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted and Fuller, Mark
Date of interview: 1982 November 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH030
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: White, Leslie Lee
Biographical note: Leslie Lee White was born in Little Rock, Arkansas then relocated with his family to Paducah, Kentucky. When he was twenty he traveled to New York City in hopes of finding employment. It was in New York that he enlisted in the United States Army. He traveled overseas on a ship called the U.S.S. Great Northern. White was assigned to Company B, 520th Engineers and was stationed at Brest, France.
Description: Leslie Lee White was born in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1896. He received his education at Lincoln School in Paducah, Kentucky. White discusses the problems encountered by African-American during the early half of the 20th Century. In 1916, he departed Paducah for New York City where he hoped to find employment. He comments on the war, volunteering for service, boot camp and the trans Atlantic voyage to France. He was assigned to the 520th Engineers. His convoy was attacked by a German submarine on the way to France. He recalls the submarine being sunk by an escort ship with the fleet. After the war, White returned to Paducah where he married Maybell Williams. He also mentions his grandmother, who was a slave and her experiences.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH027
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Dunlap, L. Monroe
Biographical note: L. Monroe Dunlap was born in Paducah, Kentucky. He attended Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio prior to the start of the First World War. He taught in Metropolis, Illinois and was an elementary school principal in Brookport, Illinois.
Description: L. Monroe Dunlap, an African American World War I veteran, discusses his his family life, early education, job experiences and college education. The majority of the interview focuses on the college he attended and the military training he received at the camp located on campus. He also discussed the different schools he taught at and the changes in the Paducah School System.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 19
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH009
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Williams, Dewey (Part 2)
Biographical note: Dewey Williams was born on July 26, 1899 in Tennessee but grew up in Hazel, Kentucky. He enlisted in the United States Army when he was seventeen. He trained at Salem, New Jersey. He was transported to France where he received more military training and then was stationed in Liverpool, England for the duration of the war. Following the war, he relocated to Arkansas for employment. During the Great Depression, he moved to Detroit, Michigan. He returned to Hazel, Kentucky in 1940.
Description: Dewey Williams, a resident of Hazel, Kentucky, discusses his experiences during World War I and the Great Depression. He recalls the military training he received, the Armistice, being “shell shocked”, the loss of life caused by carelessness with weapons and his return back to the United States. He also discusses the effects of the Great Depression, searching for employment in Detroit and his job making railroad ties.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Hoover, Saundra
Date of interview: 1979 September 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH028
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pryor, William
Biographical note: William Pryor was born March 23, 1890 in Benton, Kentucky. He was drafted into the army and sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He then reported to Newport News, Virginia where he remained a month before going to Brest, France by ship. He traveled to places such as Bardou, France and Jazz, France. He remained in Europe until a year after the Armistice was signed.
Description: William Pryor, a resident of Paducah, Kentucky, discusses his experiences in World War I. They include recollections in military training camps, his voyage across the ocean to Europe in a navy convoy and conflicts amongst black and white soldiers. He recalls when he returned home from the war and the fact that the president of the company where he worked killed a man. Pryor mentions his mother who was a slave. He shares the stories she told such as being taught to read by white children, receiving punishment from owners and being set freed. In conclusion, Pryor tells of his move to Paducah, his marriage and the documents he lost in the flood of 1937.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 27
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH025
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Milam, Carl (Part 2)
Biographical note: Carl Milam was a resident of Tennessee. His basic training was in Dresden, Tennessee and later to Knoxville. He was ordered to Jacksonville, Florida for training in motor transport. Milam then traveled to New York to board a ship to travel to Brest, France.
Description: Carl Milam recalls his experiences during World War I. He offers general background information and shares his thoughts regarding the war. He mentions his basic training and reluctance to go to war. Other topics discussed include: his reaction to President Woodrow Wilson’s declaration of war; his trip overseas; impressions of the French people; camp conditions, troop morale; his attitude toward the Armistice; the return trip to the United States; receiving his discharge; contact with other veterans; the justification of the war; race relations overseas and the rewards of army life.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1982 October 2
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH022
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Knight, Charles L.
Biographical note: Charles Knight was a farmer prior to being drafted into the United States Army. He was sent to basic training in Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky where he trained to be a prison guard. When discharged from the army, Knight relocated to Barlow, Kentucky.
Description: Charles Knight discusses his experiences during the First World War. Included in the discussions are his recollections of basic training, his responsibilities guarding prisoners and the different types of prisoners held in confinement. Knight served in the United States Army for six months before contracting the flu and being medically discharged. He mentions the entertainment and recreation provided to American soldiers. Knight also explains his justification for joining the war effort, outlook on life and contacts with fellow veterans of the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1983 June 28
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH019
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Caldwell, Frank (Part 1)
Biographical note: Frank Caldwell was born in 1896 in McCracken County, Kentucky. His father, Chris Caldwell, was a share cropper in Ballard County, Kentucky. He was drafted into the service on July 29, 1919. He went to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. He was one of the first in the 801 Division. He went from Camp Taylor to New Jersey then on to New York. He later boarded a ship that landed in Brest, France.
Description: Frank Caldwell discusses his experiences during the First World War. He describes basic training camps, the condition of France and the French people during the war and the outbreak of spinal meningitis. Caldwell mentions the feelings toward Americans at home and his feelings after the war. He also describes the flood of Paducah, Kentucky in 1937.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Peyton, Bill
Date of interview: 1979 September 21
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH003
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War I - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Melugin, Hugh
Biographical note: Hugh Melugin was a resident of Calloway County in Murray, Kentucky. He was born on March 1, 1894, the youngest of five children, and the only member of his family to serve in the First World War. When drafted into the United States Army he was sent to Camp Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky where he stayed for the duration of the war.
Description: Hugh Melugin discusses his experiences during World War I. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1918 and was sent Camp Taylor, Kentucky. His job at Camp Taylor was to manage the payroll and other clerical duties. Melugin mentions how he anticipated going overseas, but never was offered the opportunity. He recalls there not being many noticeable changes in Calloway County during his time in the service. However, he was surprised to find the increase of women in the workforce. He also tells how the automobile had come into popularity following the war. He concludes the interview by telling what it was like to live during the war years.
Descriptors: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives, American. / United States. Army -- Military life. / Soldiers -- Kentucky.
Interviewed by: Pasco, Kathryn
Date of interview: 1979 September 25
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH020
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Byrd, Sally
Biographical note: Sally Byrd worked periodically for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation in Owensboro, Kentucky from the early 1930s to the end of the Second World War.
Description: Sally Byrd recounts her experiences working for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky from the early 1930s to the end of the Second World War. She describes why she began to work at the plant, the hourly wages she received, general working conditions and the age and social makeup of her coworkers. She expressed in detail her feelings on labor unions and their activities before and during the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1995 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH179
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Young, Hazel
Biographical note: Hazel Young was born in 1923 at Owensboro, Kentucky. Soon after graduating from high school in 1941 she was employed by Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation. She met her husband at Ken-Rad and was married in October 1941. She worked at the plant until late 1942 when her husband was drafted and she relocated with him to a military training base. She returned to Ken-Rad for another year after her husband was stationed overseas.
Description: Hazel Young describes her experiences working at the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation of Owensboro, Kentucky during the Second World War. She describes the hiring process and her job assignments at the factory. She recalls the working conditions and the various amenities provided by the company for the workers. The interview concludes with her opinions on company benefits and the influence of labor unions.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH183
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Eldridge, Charles
Biographical note: Charles Eldridge was born in Hamlin, Kentucky sometime in the early 1920s. After graduating from high school in New Concord, Kentucky, he attended Murray State Teacher’s College (currently Murray State University). In March of 1943, he was drafted into the infantry and sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. He was later assigned to the 75th Division and stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. He severely injured his leg during a training exercise and spent the remainder of the war at O’Reilly Veterans Hospital at Springfield, Missouri. Discharged in October 1945, he returned to Murray State Teachers College and after graduation was employed by the college.
Description: Charles Eldridge offers details into his experiences during the Second World War. He describes life in Calloway County, Kentucky prior to and after the war. He was drafted and stationed at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana and later at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Injured in a training accident at Fort Leonard Wood, he spent the remainder of the war at O’Reilly Veterans Hospital in Springfield, Missouri. He recalls his experiences at the hospital and with the Veterans Administration. He describes the general opinion of the people of Calloway County following the war and its effect upon the community. He concludes by mentioning significant individuals and events during the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1981 December 1981
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH140
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ford, James P. (part 2)
Biographical note: James P. Ford was born in Silvis, Illinois in 1921. He dropped out of school after the 8th grade and began working as a soda jerk and later for a news agency. In 1937, he joined a Civilian Conservation Corps camp. Two years later, he worked for a foundry in Mullen, Illinois. He joined the Marine Corps in 1940 and trained at San Diego, California. He was stationed at Corregidor, Philippines when Bataan fell to the Japanese in early 1942. He was made a prisoner of war and sent to a camp near Cabanatuan, the Philippines. He was liberated by the United States 1st Calvary in September of 1944. After the war, he received his General Educational Development (GED) and attended Roosevelt College (currently Roosevelt University) at Chicago, Illinois.
Description: James P. Ford details his experiences during the Second World War. He provides his pre-war background and motivation for entering the United States Marine Corps prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Stationed at Corregidor, Philippines, he discusses the day to day activities of the fortress before the Japanese attack and the events during the battle. He describes his capture, time spent as a prisoner of war at Cabanatuan and his liberation by American troops in September of 1944. He concludes by discussing his return to the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1982 September 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH143
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Perry, Charles W.
Biographical note: Charles W. “Dub” Perry was born in Almo, Kentucky on November 11, 1918. At nineteen he moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee. In March of 1941, he volunteered for the United States Army and attended Fort Belvoir, Virginia for basic training and was stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina with the 96th Battalion, Corps of Engineers. When the Second World War began he was shipped to Townsville, Australia and fought in the New Guinea Campaign. He remained in New Guinea for thirty four months. While on a three month furlough in the United States he was diagnosed with gastritis and discharged at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.
Description: Charles W. “Dub” Perry details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes volunteering for the United States Army and training at Fort Belvoir, Virginia and Fort Bragg, North Carolina. During the war, he was stationed at Fort Belvoir, Fort Bragg, Fort Indiantown Gap, Brooklyn, the Barbados Islands, Australia, New Guinea, San Francisco Camp Atterbury, Atlantic City, and Fort Leonard Wood. He details the missions he was involved during the New Guinea Campaign and concludes with his medical discharge in 1945.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 October 24
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH156
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Hortin, Loren Joseph
Biographical note: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin was born at Albion, Illinois in 1904. He attended McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois and graduated in 1927. After graduation, he taught at various high schools in Illinois and worked as a reporter for the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1928, he was hired as a faculty member at Murray State Normal School as an instructor of journalism. From 1930 to 1947, he was a staff writer for the Associated Press, Louisville Courier-Journal and Paducah Sun-Democrat. He acquired a Master of Arts degree from Murray State College in 1943. In 1947, he became director of the School of Journalism at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Hortin returned to Murray State in 1967 and acted as head of the journalism program until his retirement in 1974. Between 1928 and 1938, he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Lower Tennessee Valley Association, which sought to construct a dam on the lower Tennessee River. He also was the manager of the City Chamber of Commerce at Murray from 1934 to 1938. He was elected into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1981 and received honorary doctorates from McKendree College and Murray State University. He died on November 27, 1992.
Description: Loren Joseph “L.J.” Hortin details his experiences during the Second World War. He explains day to day life in Murray, Kentucky and the Jackson Purchase. He also reflects upon the sentiments of the population prior to and during the war. He mentions rationing and the illegal trading of ration stamps, as well as the economic consequences of the war. He discusses the economic concerns of the lend-lease program and regional plants that produced ammunition and clothing for the war effort.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hoyt, Michael
Date of interview: 1974 December 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH145
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Parrent, Jessie Dail
Biographical note: Jessie Dail Parrent was born in 1922 in Lyon County, Kentucky. Her parents were sharecroppers and moved frequently about the county during her childhood. She met and married her husband in 1940. During the Second World War, she worked with her husband on their farm in Lyon County.
Description: Jessie Dail Parrent details her experiences during the Second World War. She explains her family background and life before the war. Her memories of the war focus upon rationing and the local men who died while in the service. She provides her thoughts on national and state politicians and concludes with post-war celebrations in the region.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH148
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Roberts, Frank
Biographical note: Frank Roberts was born May 10, 1908 in Calloway County, Kentucky. He was one of the first graduates of the Murray Training School (presently Murray State University) in 1927. Prior to the Second World War, he worked for the Ford Motor Company in Detroit, Michigan. After the war he constructed homes in Murray from 1944 until 1952, when he began working for the Pennsalt Chemical Company (currently Arkema Inc.) in Calvert City, Kentucky. He retired in 1970.
Description: Frank Roberts recounts his experiences during the Second World War. He discusses effects of the Second World War in Calloway County, Kentucky. He then explains the changes which occurred at the Ford Motor Company at Detroit, Michigan during the war. He also describes rationing, prominent individuals and political organizations during the era. He concludes by describing racial attitudes and relations in Calloway County during and after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hoyt, Michael A.
Date of interview: 1974 December 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH151
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Greer, Henry
Biographical note: Henry Greer was born on July 19, 1935 at Springhill, Kentucky. He attended the all black school of Riverview High School at Hickman, Kentucky. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1953 and sent to basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He was assigned to Company G, 101st Airborne Division and sent to Fort Gordon, Georgia where he attended Military Police School. He was stationed at Bremerhaven, Germany and Verdun, France as a Military Police officer. He was discharged from the Army in 1956 at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Later that same year, he enlisted with the United States Air Force and was stationed at Castle Air Force Base, Merced, California as a Military Police officer. Greer was discharged in 1960 and afterwards relocated to Clinton, Kentucky. In 1967, he began a career as a truck driver.
Description: Henry Greer details his experiences as an African American soldier in the United States Army and Air Force from 1953 through 1960. He describes his background and attitudes towards the Korean Conflict. He discusses his duties and encounters as an enlisted soldier in the Military Police in Bremerhaven, Germany and Verdun, France. He further describes his discharge and reenlistment in the United States Air Force. Greer mentions his experiences serving as a military policeman at Castle Air Force Base, Merced, California and his final discharge in 1960. He concludes with a discussion on racial issues while growing up in West Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 9
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH155
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Dillard, Golden (part 1)
Biographical note: Golden Dillard was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on October 2, 1912. He moved to Toledo, Ohio in 1928. He returned to Calloway County, Kentucky in 1939 and worked for 2 ½ years at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp near Murray, Kentucky. He was drafted and entered the United States Army in 1942. He trained at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi. He was assigned to motor-pool division and spent time in Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia and Camp Shanks, New York. He was sent overseas and was involved in the European theater of the war. When the war concluded he was assigned to Camp Atterbury, Indiana and was later discharged in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He returned to Murray, Kentucky and later assisted in the development of an American Legion Post in that city. He was its commander from 1976 to 1982.
Description: Golden Dillard details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes his life prior to war and the time he spent in the Civilian Conservation Corps near Murray, Kentucky. During the war, he was stationed or at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi, Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia, Camp Shanks, New York, Camp Atterbury, Indiana and overseas bases in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium and Germany. He details his duties as part of the United States Army Motor Pool and activities throughout the war. He claimed to have been the personal driver of General Dwight D. Eisenhower for three months while stationed at Frankfurt, Germany. He concludes with his post-war experiences and work with the American Legion Post in Murray, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH154
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Belote, Jack (Session 2)
Biographical note: Jack Belote, a native of Mayfield, Kentucky, was a 1941 graduate of Murray State Teachers College with a degree in biology and mathematics. He was drafted into the United States Navy in 1941. During the war he was stationed at St. Louis, Missouri, Jacksonville, Florida, Corpus Christi, Texas and Murray, Kentucky. At Murray, he served as a naval flight guidance instructor for the Naval Preparatory School. He died on April 12, 2009.
Description: Jack Belote offers details into his experiences during the Second World War. He spent four and one-half years as a naval training officer in the United States Navy and was part of the Naval Preparatory School at Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). He discusses the various duties assigned to him during the war, such as naval flight guidance instructor and rations officer. He recounts his experiences when Pearl Harbor was attacked and the reaction of his fellow officers. He concludes by describing life in the Jackson Purchase of Kentucky area prior to the war and how it had changed after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: James, Joe Pat
Date of interview: No date listed.
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH138
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Quirey, Wanda
Biographical note: Wanda Quirey was born in Christian County, Kentucky on July 18, 1921. She grew up in Crofton and Earlington, Kentucky. As a teenager she worked at a local drugstore. She married and moved to Sturgis, Kentucky in 1942. Her husband was a soldier with General George C. Patton’s Third Army Corps in Europe. During the war, she was a member of the Junior Women’s Club and worked for the Red Cross. She concludes with her thoughts on prominent political leaders and significant events of the war.
Description: Wanda Quirey details her experiences during the Second World War. She discusses her family background and memories following the attack on Pearl Harbor. She describes life in Western Kentucky during the Second World War and the general attitude in the region. She offers insight into the local war bond drives, rationing, Camp Breckinridge and Sturgis Airfield.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH150
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Sutliff, Earl M.
Biographical note: Earl M. Sutliff was born in Princeton, Illinois around 1910. Prior to the Second World War, he was a store manager for Brown Lynch Scott Department Store in Aledo, Illinois. He was drafted into the United States Navy in 1943 and was stationed at Camp Peary, Virginia for basic training. During the war, he served with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts at Cleveland, Ohio. He later was stationed at Mobile, Alabama, San Bruno, California, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Manila, the Philippines, Guam, and Chicago, Illinois. He was discharged from the military in Chicago in November of 1945.
Description: Earl M. Sutliff describes his experiences during the Second World War. He describes his training and duties with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts at Cleveland, Ohio and his travels to the Philippines and Guam to distribute pay to service personnel following the Japanese occupation. He discusses the war-torn areas he visited during the war and recounts post-war celebrations, benefits to servicemen and his discharge from the military.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1983 October 26
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH152
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Rowlett, Arthur W.
Biographical note: Arthur W. Rowlett was born on August 12, 1900 in New Concord, Kentucky and relocation to Murray, Kentucky in 1909. In 1918 he was scheduled to depart for military training for the First World War, however the Armistice was signed days before he was to depart and his training was canceled. Prior to the Second World War, he worked making tobacco twists in Calloway County, Kentucky. He was drafted in 1942 and sent to the Jefferson Barracks Military Post at St. Louis, Missouri for basic training. From there he was stationed at March Field, California and was discharged in 1943 due to his age. After being discharged he returned to Murray where he worked on a farm and later as a chauffeur for a local physician.
Description: Arthur W. Rowlett details his brief experience as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes his employment prior to the war and recalls where he was when Pearl Harbor was attached. He mentions his brief spell in the United States Army, his discharge and racial issues he either witnessed or experienced. He concludes the interview with a discussion on his employment opportunities following his discharge.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 13
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH157
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cowan, Thurman
Biographical note: Thurman Cowan was born on September 4, 1924 in Henry County, Tennessee. Prior to the Second World War, he resided in Paris, Tennessee and worked on the construction of Camp Tyson. At seventeen, he moved to Chicago, Illinois and worked in a mattress factory until he was drafted into the United States Marines in August of 1943. He trained with an African American regiment at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. He was first stationed at Pearl Harbor then at Guam. When the war concluded, he returned to Camp Lejeune and was discharged on February 28, 1946. After the war, he worked for the Electrical Division of General Motors and for the Chicago Main Post Office.
Description: Thurman Cowan details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes the construction of Camp Tyson at Paris, Tennessee prior to the United States entering the war. He discusses his military duties while serving the United States Marines as a “mess-man”, life in Hawaii and Guam during the war and racial issues he encountered while in the military. Cowan concludes the interview with his discharge and his post-war life in Chicago, Illinois.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by:
Date of interview: 1986 October 23
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH153
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Wilkins, Joe (part 2)
Biographical note: Joe Wilkins was born March 9, 1920 in Henry County, Tennessee. Prior to the Second World War, he worked as a night man at a hotel. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1941 and attended basic training at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Georgia and was stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey. During the war, he was stationed in the United Kingdom, Algeria, Italy and France. He participated in both the North African and Italian Campaigns. He saw action during the Allied invasion of Italy at Salerno and the Battle of Anzio. He was discharged in September of 1945. After the war, he worked as a truck driver. Wilkins reenlisted into the United States Army in 1950 at Fort Lewis, Washington and was stationed in Korea during the Korean War. He was discharged at Fort Lewis following the war.
Description: Joe Wilkins recounts his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War and Korean War. He describes his training prior to United States entry in the war. He provides an account of events in North Africa and Italy and his participation in those campaigns. He discusses his civilian occupations and life between the Second World War and the Korean War. Wilkins concluded the interview by recalling his participation in the Korean War and racial issues he witnessed in the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH158
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Pinkley, L. K.
Biographical note: L. K. Pinkley was born in Buena Vista, Carroll County, Tennessee. His family moved to the Jackson Purchase area of Kentucky in 1934. Prior to the Second World War, he worked as a sales representative for the Davison Chemical Corporation in Nashville, Tennessee. He was drafted in 1943 and assigned to the 106th Infantry Division at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He was ordered to Europe in 1944 and was present at the Battle of the Bulge, where he was captured by the Germans under the command of Field Marshall Gerd von Rundstedt. He was a prisoner at Stalag IX-B, Bad Orb for a month before being sent to Stalag IX-A, Ziegenhain. He was liberated by the 65th Infantry Division accompanied by the 6th Armored Division on March 30, 1945. He was then taken to Camp Lucky Strike, Janville, France and arrived back in the United States on May 13, 1945.
Description: L. K. Pinkley details his experiences during the Second World War. He begins by describing his family background, being drafted into the United States Army and his military assignments. The interview mainly focuses upon his capture during the Battle of the Bulge and imprisonment by the Germans. He describes life as a prisoner of war in Germany and concludes with the liberation of the prison camp on March 30, 1945.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Elliott, David
Date of interview: 1982 May 4
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH149
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Garrott, Morris C.
Biographical note: Morris C. Garrott was born in Mayfield, Kentucky in 1918. Prior to the Second World War, he attended Murray State Teacher’s College (now Murray State University) from 1936 to 1940. He also worked at the local Pigly-Wiggly and for the Mayfield Messenger. He was drafted in Mayfield and sworn-in at Louisville on April 3, 1941. He was first sent to Fort Thomas, Kentucky then to Fort Knox, Kentucky as part of a Railhead Company. In February of 1942, he attended Officer Candidates School (OCS) for training. He was later stationed at Fort Livingston, Louisiana and Fort Sam Houston, Texas before being sent to France as the company commander of the 3537th Unit Replacement Company. He was en route to the Philippines at the end of war but rerouted to Boston, Massachusetts for discharge. After the war, he returned to work for the Mayfield Messenger as a journalist in Harlan, Kentucky.
Description: Morris C. Garrott details his experiences during the Second World War. He discusses his duties as an enlisted soldier, training at the Officer Candidates School (OCS) and duties as the company commander of the 3537th Unit Replacement Company in the United States and Europe. He provides anecdotes of his experiences in the military, as well as individuals from Mayfield, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Elliott, David
Date of interview: 1981 October 20
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH144
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Wilkins, Joe (part 1)
Biographical note: Joe Wilkins was born March 9, 1920 in Henry County, Tennessee. Prior to the Second World War, he worked as a night man at a hotel. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1941 and attended basic training at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Georgia and was stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey. During the war, he was stationed in the United Kingdom, Algeria, Italy and France. He participated in both the North African and Italian Campaigns. He saw action during the Allied invasion of Italy at Salerno and the Battle of Anzio. He was discharged in September of 1945. After the war, he worked as a truck driver. Wilkins reenlisted into the United States Army in 1950 at Fort Lewis, Washington and was stationed in Korea during the Korean War. He was discharged at Fort Lewis following the war.
Description: Joe Wilkins recounts his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War and Korean War. He describes his training prior to United States entry in the war. He provides an account of events in North Africa and Italy and his participation in those campaigns. He discusses his civilian occupations and life between the Second World War and the Korean War. Wilkins concluded the interview by recalling his participation in the Korean War and racial issues he witnessed in the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 October 22
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH158
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Dillard, Golden (part 2)
Biographical note: Golden Dillard was born in Calloway County, Kentucky on October 2, 1912. He moved to Toledo, Ohio in 1928. He returned to Calloway County, Kentucky in 1939 and worked for 2 ½ years at a Civilian Conservation Corps camp near Murray, Kentucky. He was drafted and entered the United States Army in 1942. He trained at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi. He was assigned to motor-pool division and spent time in Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia and Camp Shanks, New York. He was sent overseas and was involved in the European theater of the war. When the war concluded he was assigned to Camp Atterbury, Indiana and was later discharged in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He returned to Murray, Kentucky and later assisted in the development of an American Legion Post in that city. He was its commander from 1976 to 1982.
Description: Golden Dillard details his experiences as an African American soldier during the Second World War. He describes his life prior to war and the time he spent in the Civilian Conservation Corps near Murray, Kentucky. During the war, he was stationed or at Camp McCain, Grenada, Mississippi, Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee, Camp Gordon, Georgia, Camp Shanks, New York, Camp Atterbury, Indiana and overseas bases in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium and Germany. He details his duties as part of the United States Army Motor Pool and activities throughout the war. He claimed to have been the personal driver of General Dwight D. Eisenhower for three months while stationed at Frankfurt, Germany. He concludes with his post-war experiences and work with the American Legion Post in Murray, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Belue, Ted
Date of interview: 1986 November 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH154
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Murphy, Katherine
Biographical note: Katherine Murphy was born in 1928 in Kentucky. During the Second World War, she worked at the Princeton Hosiery Mill. Her husband was a non commissioned officer stationed at Fort Dix, New Jersey.
Description: Katherine Murphy details her experiences during the Second World War. She describes her childhood and early adulthood. During the war, she was employed at the Princeton Hosiery Mill of Princeton, Kentucky. She discusses her duties at the plant and life during the war. She concludes by detailing her thoughts concerning significant political figures and major events during the war. She also describes post-war celebrations at Princeton, Kentucky.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 November 16
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH147
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: King, Lillian W.
Biographical note: Lillian W. King was born in Daviess County, Kentucky in 1910. She worked for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky from the early 1930s, throughout the Second World War and after the General Electric Company acquired the plant in 1952.
Description: Lillian W. King discusses her experiences working for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky from the 1930s to the 1950s. She describes the hiring process, training and how conditions changed during the Second World War. She recalled the introduction of labor unions and the harassment that followed for those that did not joining. She also mentioned how working conditions changed after the General Electric Company acquired Ken-Rad.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 14
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH181
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Belote, Jack (Session 1)
Biographical note: Jack Belote, a native of Mayfield, Kentucky, was a 1941 graduate of Murray State Teachers College with a degree in biology and mathematics. He was drafted into the United States Navy in 1941. During the war he was stationed at St. Louis, Missouri, Jacksonville, Florida, Corpus Christi, Texas and Murray, Kentucky. At Murray, he served as a naval flight guidance instructor for the Naval Preparatory School. He died on April 12, 2009.
Description: Jack Belote offers details into his experiences during the Second World War. He spent four and one-half years as a naval training officer in the United States Navy and was part of the Naval Preparatory School at Murray State Teachers College (presently Murray State University). He discusses the various duties assigned to him during the war, such as naval flight guidance instructor and rations officer. He recounts his experiences when Pearl Harbor was attacked and the reaction of his fellow officers. He concludes by describing life in the Jackson Purchase of Kentucky area prior to the war and how it had changed after the war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Watson, John
Date of interview: 1981 December 07
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH138
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Cunningham, Guy
Biographical note: Guy Cunningham was born in 1928 in Calloway County, Kentucky. His family farmed strawberries, hemp and other crops during the Second World War. He had older two brothers and two brother-in-laws who fought during the war.
Description: Guy Cunningham offers details into his experiences in Calloway County, Kentucky, during the Second World War. The interview focuses on his family’s economic and social status as farmers during the war. He recalls governmental programs effecting Calloway County, including scrap drives, rationing, the 4-H Club and censorship. He concludes by descussing the involvement of local churches during war.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hoyt, Michael A.
Date of interview: 1974 December 10
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH139
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Howard, Anna Grace
Biographical note: Anna Grace Howard worked periodically for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation and the General Electric Company in Owensboro, Kentucky during the 1940s and 1950s. She was one of thirteen children. She worked at Ken-Rad at the age of sixteen in 1941.
Description: Anna Grace Howard discusses her career at the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation during the 1940s. She describes experiences working in a vacuum tube manufacturing plant during the Second World War. She also mentions the influence of labor unions and the changes that occurred when Ken-Rad was acquired by the General Electric Company in 1952.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 18
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH180
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Ford, James P. (part 1)
Biographical note: James P. Ford was born in Silvis, Illinois in 1921. He dropped out of school after the 8th grade and began working as a soda jerk and later for a news agency. In 1937, he joined a Civilian Conservation Corps camp. Two years later, he worked for a foundry in Mullen, Illinois. He joined the Marine Corps in 1940 and trained at San Diego, California. He was stationed at Corregidor, Philippines when Bataan fell to the Japanese in early 1942. He was made a prisoner of war and sent to a camp near Cabanatuan, the Philippines. He was liberated by the United States 1st Calvary in September of 1944. After the war, he received his General Educational Development (GED) and attended Roosevelt College (currently Roosevelt University) at Chicago, Illinois.
Description: James P. Ford details his experiences during the Second World War. He provides his pre-war background and motivation for entering the United States Marine Corps prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Stationed at Corregidor, Philippines, he discusses the day to day activities of the fortress before the Japanese attack and the events during the battle. He describes his capture, time spent as a prisoner of war at Cabanatuan and his liberation by American troops in September of 1944. He concludes by discussing his return to the United States.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Hammack, James W., Jr.
Date of interview: 1982 September 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH143
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Whitaker, Edith
Biographical note: Edith Whitaker was born in 1921 in Owensboro, Kentucky. She was the youngest of seven children and graduated high school in 1939. After graduation, she was hired at Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation. She periodically worked at the plant during the Second World War. She left Ken-Rad when labor unions were introduced to the plant in 1945.
Description: Edith Whitaker discusses her experiences while working for the Ken-Rad Tube Manufacturing Corporation at Owensboro, Kentucky between 1939 and 1945. She explains why she sought employment and described the working conditions at the factory. The interview concluded with her mentioning the limited benefits and some personal anecdotes.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Graves, Judy
Date of interview: 1996 March 17
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH182
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Fielder, Scott
Biographical note: Scott Field was born in Nashville, Tennessee. His father worked for the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railroad. Prior to the Second World War, he worked in a clothing factory making pants and shirts. He was drafted into the United States Army Infantry on February 11, 1942, and attended basic training in Tullahoma, Tennessee. He was later stationed in Tullahoma, Tennessee, Tacoma, Washington and at various bases in California, Hawaii, New Guinea, the Philippines and Japan. He was discharged in November of 1945 in Oregon after having spent the previous eight weeks stationed in Japan. Following the war, he returned to Tennessee and began working for the telephone company. In 1946, he moved to Detroit, Michigan where he remained for thirty six years.
Description: Scott Fielder details his experiences during the Second World War. He served from February 11, 1942 until November of 1945 and saw combat in the Pacific Theater. He was stationed in Tullahoma, Washington State, California, Hawaii, New Guinea, the Philippines, and Japan. He describes his training, service during the war and his discharge from the United States Army. He also gives his opinions on significant military and political figures and events during the Second World War.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH142
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Lewis, Mae Evelyn
Biographical note: Mae Evelyn Lewis was born in Lyon County, Kentucky in 1913. She worked at a hosiery mill in Calloway County, Kentucky from 1927 until the end of the Second World War.
Description: Mae Evelyn Lewis details her experience during the Second World War. She describes life in the Jackson Purchase area of Kentucky during the late 1920s and 1930s. She provides detail into rationing during the Second World War and the way it impacted the region.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 7
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH146
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.
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Title of Collection: World War II - Oral History.
Name of person interviewed: Fielder, Dorothy
Biographical note: Dorothy Fielder was born in Henshaw, Union County, Kentucky in the early 1920s. During the Second World War she worked in a hosiery mill in Princeton, Kentucky.
Description: Dorothy Fielder details her experiences during the Second World War. She explains her time at the hosiery mill in Princeton, Kentucky. The interview concludes with her memories of life in Princeton during the war and her feelings on significant figures and events.
Descriptors: World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American.
Interviewed by: Parrent, Jay
Date of interview: 1997 December 5
Contributed by: Jackson Purchase Oral History Project.
Identification number: OH141
Location: Murray State University Special Collections & Archives.